Booted and Crated

travel trailers blog
Tank Crate

When we retired from the work a day world we already knew where we wanted to work camp, as a way to offset expenses and camping fees, while we traveled. A land management company out of Utah was the contractor for Trujillo Meadows campground, located North of Chama New Mexico, just barely over in Colorado. We were familiar with the campground and knew that it would be a good match for us, and it was only twenty miles from town for quick access to laundry and groceries. However, it was well above ten thousand feet of elevation and we would be off of the grid for over one hundred and ten days. We picked up our first solar panels and a spare propane tank.

Now, many RVer's have a spare propane tank because they are multi purpose and convenient. But this was our first experience with carrying one for so many miles. It wasn't long before we were tired of that ever so handy tank, tipping over and rolling around, while going down the highway.

Other's had found the "tippy tank" solution well before we even knew that it existed, and it was pretty simple. The plentiful milk crate just fit the tank like it was made for it!

We had found our quick and simple fix ! As our three tanks rotated into and out of the crate and was set down with it's considerable weight we found that there was another issue. The weight coupled with the shape of the bottom of the tank, soon cut a circle out of the crate and our quick fix wasn't any more !

cut crate
tankfoot

Milk crates are pretty easy to come by, so we replaced a couple of them before we found a tank boot that would resolve the circle cutting issue. Here is a look.

The tank boot itself doesn't cut out because of the way it is flanged at the base of the propane tank. A simple inexpensive solution with no more tank rolling around in the back of the vehicle.

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