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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/28/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    If the 2.8 amps is correct 12V DC current for your furnace, you could run your furnace for 10 hours with a 100% duty cycle (always on) and use roughly 28 amp hours or 350 watt hours. I am not certain what your batter configuration is but I will try to find the spec. capacity for the 4x6V AGM setup. I think it is something like 440 amp hours (or 5,500 watt hours), but I will need to do some research to verify this setup. Using your propane furnace provides your trailer with 19,000 BTUs of heat during that time. The 1500 watt electric heater produces approximately 5000 BTUs of heat but uses considerably more electricity but zero propane. This is okay when you have hookups, but if you have propane it is likely much better to use the generator to charge the batteries up so that you can continue using the furnace. when one boondocks requiring heat” the furnace blower is run off the juice stored in Batteries Correct? If so how long could one expect the batteries to handle the Blower operation.
  2. 3 points
    Oliver is going to take care of this window issue and I must say I'm very impressed with their level of professionalism in helping us. They truly are a company above the rest. Sorry for my ranting and displaying my frustration publicly on this forum.
  3. 2 points
    The article below from Technomadia indicates that the Oliver AGM setup has 220 amp hours of usable capacity (which is also temperature and discharge rate dependent). So assuming you have full batteries and you only used your furnace (no other electrical) you would expect to be able to run your furnace fan with a 100% duty cycle (always on) for just over 78 hours when the temperature is 80’F outside. Note: The usable capacity is expected to drop off a bit in the cold weather. According to the Trojan specs you might expect to lose about 20% capacity at 30’F (62 hours run time) and 40% at -5’F (46 hours runtime). Please understand that my numbers are not representative of any practical experience. Please test your system properly before heading out in the cold weather. https://www.technomadia.com/2011/10/lithium-update-lead-acid-downsides/
  4. 2 points
    It's only dumb if you don't ask, well if the sun comes out in the morning you will be able to go as long as the propane holds out. You'll run out of gas before anything else if the sun shines. Just a note if you do cold weather camping always have a back up source, don't ask how I know. I keep a small cube heater should we have electric and when boon docking I keep a small propane buddy heater with several small green propane bottles. Thanks Gary
  5. 1 point
    Another fyi for anyone thinking about packing cubes for a Christmas present this year.... Ebags has a great deal on a set of six... I've used several brands over the years . The ebag cubes really hold up well. Sherry
  6. 1 point
    Yukon, If the 2.8 amps is the correct 12V DC current for your furnace fan, you could run your furnace for 10 hours with a 100% duty cycle (always on) and use roughly 28 amp hours or 350 watt hours. I am not certain what your batter configuration is but I will try to find the spec. capacity for the 4x6V AGM setup. I think it is something like 440 amp hours (or 5,500 watt hours), but I will need to do some research to verify this setup. Using your propane furnace provides your trailer with 19,000 BTUs of heat during that time. The 1500 watt electric heater produces approximately 5000 BTUs of heat but uses considerably more electricity but zero propane. This is okay when you have hookups, but if you have propane it is likely much better to use the generator to charge the batteries up so that you can continue using the furnace. when one boondocks requiring heat” the furnace blower is run off the juice stored in Batteries Correct? If so how long could one expect the batteries to handle the Blower operation.
  7. 1 point
    We bought magnetic RV baggage door magnets. I used command hook tape to stick each side to the bottom of the door frame and the matching side to the lower side of the dinette seat. You don’t even notice them. We’ve used these for about a year now in the Texas heat and they are still going strong. Just doing a google search for RV baggage clips and I came across another type that already has 3M tape attached. Like a round knob. Looks very nice.
  8. 1 point
    As indicated above, depends on what you set the T-Stat to and the ambient. In general, our fully charged stock batteries will power up the furnace all night on a charge. We camp high and have had several nights with freezing temp's and have not had a problem with the batteries topped off via generator before going to bed. I also support having a supplemental heat source. Even if it is only your Honda and a 1500 watt electric heater. Without kids or pets in the trailer, we like to put the heater in front of the bath room entry facing the emergency escape window. Out of the way and a plug is handy there also. Have fun! Geronimo John
  9. 1 point
    Oops, you are 100% right, I was thinking of a different model. Thanks for the correction. 2.8 amps is more reasonable. John Davies Spokane WA
  10. 1 point
    John, Which furnace are you using? I ask since 7 amps seems high compared to what the Elite 2 manual states. Please note that I have no practical experience yet with the trailer or the furnace. Mike
  11. 1 point
    The furnace fan uses about 7 amps DC, which is a fair amount but the run time depends entirely on the thermostat setting. Keep it at 65 degrees and your system will run often. Bundle up in a warm bag and turn it down to 45 and it will not be a worry. We stay at 65, just because we can. We spent way too many decades shivering in the wee hours of the morning. No more of that silliness. Yes, a backup heat source is prudent, we ran dry one time. It was very embarrassing for the person responsible for system maintenance, me, and it generated a good deal of noise from the Other Half. I do not plan to let it happen again. Since that fiasco I have been pondering an Olympic Wave radiant heater but I have not figured out an acceptable fixed mounting location that is both away from the beds and dogs, and out of the traffic flow. This type of heater uses zero electrical power but does need good ventilation, which could be a worry in rainy weather. Any mounting suggestions are welcome. ... http://www.rv-travel-lifestyle.com/radiant-heater.html https://www.amazon.com/Olympian-Portable-Catalytic-Camco-57331/dp/B000BUV1RK?th=1 John Davies Spokane WA
  12. 1 point
    Nice to read through these old threads! Most folks don’t know that Chris and Cherie (Technomadia) were early Oliver owners. I used to worry about monitoring my propane levels. Now, I just use one tank and when it goes empty (or close) I switch to the full tank and fill the empty when I can. They last so long it really isn’t a big issue. Mike
  13. 1 point
    Camping in Wyoming, I met Rob & Amy, co-owners of BABCOCK METALS, of Talmage, UT. Rob is a world class welder / fabricator who does work on major industrial products and household furnishings. He also loves the challenge of creating custom designed solutions for customers' unique needs . . . such as an elegant and strong 2" receiver hitch for the back of my Ollie which allows unhindered access to the sewer hose inside the rear bumper and removal of the spare tire cover. Let me show you his creation . . . It started with two machined stainless steel brackets for the exterior of the frame, cut to permit the bumper to swing down without interference. The brackets each had three holes to accommodate a 5/8 inch hardened grade 8 bolts. Inside the frame, he added six solid blocks of aluminum which had also been drilled for the 5/8 inch grade 8 bolts. Using stainless steel curved tubing with a 2 inch ID, Rob measured the angles required to ensure clearance would permit access to the rear bumper compartment and spare tire. Finally, he made a 2" receiver, curved exactly for welding onto the stainless steel pipe. His artistry at welding is evident in the finished product. After applying a brushed finish to the exterior of the hitch, Rob installed it onto The Wonder Egg. The hitch fits the rear portion of the frame perfectly and each of the six grade 8, hardened steel bolts was snugged down with 200 ft lbs of torque. I feel very confident in the ability of this custom hitch to do the job. If you ever think that you may be traveling near eastern Utah and are in search for a hitch solution for your Ollie, contact Babcock Metals (678.480.0204) and I bet they could create just what your are looking for.
  14. 1 point
    It's not my intention to start a post complaining about Oliver attention to detail when it comes to the overall finish of the fiberglass shell - its smoothness, shine, or overall quality of the appearance, but rather to ask if anyone else has found a similar issue. As I carefully washed my Ollie - intending to really get it clean, ready it for an overall wax (Rejex) job, I noticed several areas, splotches of graininess, where the fiberglass was not as polished as other areas. Certainly not as smooth as the boat hulls I have owned. These would only be visible under the right light, right angle, looking for a "defect" kind of inspection. I thought a little light hand rubbing with some light compound would take care of it, but soon decided to try my buffer and some Mequires Ultimate compound - now that was the ticket - I had a nice slick, shiny, grain free surface. In short, I ended up buffing the entire top half - up to the waterfall line of the roof - and then applying the Rejex. I am certain the O will never look this good again. Once I finish the top - roof- I plan to do the lower half. I also found the Mequires worked well on the window frames and the "black" streaking comes of with a light hand rub. (second time doing this) I am probably a little to critical "weird" when it comes to paint finishes, especially on vehicles and such, but I am curious if I am the only one who noticed a similar issue. I honestly believe a "normal" owner likely wouldn't notice what I'm describing. It fear it will ending up looking to pretty to take out on the road - too bad - it's gonna get used and dirty! RB
  15. 1 point
    I detailed “Mouse” a while back and did not feel the need to polish first. I pressure washed and then hand washed with a strong concentration of Dawn, to strip off any previous wax, wiped down with 3M Adhesive Cleaner (bugs, sap and tar) and then applied Rejex. It looked stunning and the finish is holding up very well. I have received compliments about the gelcoat by boat owners who know what to look for. Looking down the side in good light shows no ripples, dips, dull, or uneven areas, just a smooth even glossy surface. One person commented, “Oliver sure knows how do fiberglass!” I agree. They have had decades of practice building high end bathroom tubs and enclosures, and that experience is evident in their trailers. While I continue to have reservations about how certain parts of the trailers are put together, the shell and frame are not in that category. I suspect that the final buffing at the factory is a little variable depending who does it, but I certainly have zero complaints about my trailer. It makes me smile every time I see it. John Davies Spokane WA
  16. 1 point
    Tom, Good idea and nice job on the size and style but good luck on that tailgating issue. When I ordered Twist I asked Anita to not have any of the graphics on the sides or front. In a quizzical tone she said was I sure. So, I asked her why she thought I should have them. She replied that by keeping the Oliver, Legacy Elite II on the sides it would save me a bunch of time both on the road and in campgrounds by not having to constantly answer peoples questions as to what he camper was. Just another reason why I like her. On at least one early trailer there was a 1-800 contact number for Oliver on the spare tire cover. I'm not sure if that was a customer's or a factory demo model. Bill
  17. 1 point
    Hi Everyone! My name is Dave Seykota and I live in Wayne, IL (a Chicago suburb). After a long Summer of eager anticipation (placed my order back in July) I will be picking up my Oliver Elite II next week Thursday at the Ollie plant in Hohenwald! I retired in May, was planning to purchase an Airstream in June, when I stumbled across the Oliver fiberglass trailer while researching on the internet. My son and I toured the Oliver plant in Tennessee on one day and then drove to the Airstream plant in Ohio a few days later and made their plant tour. The following week after easily recognizing the Oliver trailer is the best value, I ordered my Oliver just as Anita said... "You'll be back!" I have enjoyed reading the threads on this forum all summer long and found them to be extremely helpful with my own planning. Thank you all for sharing your information. I hope to be able to contribute to the forum as well. Now the fun begins as I plan to spend a lot of time visiting national parks and traveling during retirement! Sincerely, Dave S in Wayne, IL (dsinwayne)
  18. 1 point
    Angler, I've read numerous ideas on propane level checks, from a stick on decal "thingy" to pouring a special fluid down the side and watching it change colors, and the good old standby "tap test". In your post, you mentioned tanks, meaning I suppose, that you have two. If this is the case, I'm sure you also have the automatic crossover valve. In this case you're all set. With both tanks connected to the auto-switchover valve, operate with both propane tanks to the full open setting (full counterclockwise on the tanks). There is a lever on the crossover valve. Place it full to the side towards one of the tanks and this will become your initial primary tank. It should last a long time, depending on use. I have 30 lb tanks and one lasted five weeks of continuous camping. (For one guy and his dog - no furnace used) Go camping and have lots and lots of fun, occasionally lifting the cover to your tanks and checking the GREEN stripe in the view window of the crossover valve. When it turns to RED, your initial primary tank has gone totally empty and you're now running on the back-up tank. Swap the lever over so it points at the back-up tank. It now becomes your primary. Close the valve on the empty tank and get it filled at your leisure, being sure to not tarry toooooo long. When you fill it up and put it on your trailer and open its valve full open, it is now the back-up. By using this method, you really don't need to know the exact level because you always have a full back-up waiting to take over. Enjoy!
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