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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/17/2019 in all areas

  1. Hi John, I am going to be running some tests on the PM system as soon as I get an iPad to test with. So far every other system I have tested with have had no issues.
    1 point
  2. A couple of questions. I found the Precision 1/2" torque wrench many of you have purchased. I assume you needed to purchase an extender that you attach the socket to in order to use this torque wrench on the lug nuts on the wheels on the Olliver. Which one specifically did you buy? Also, I don't think I have 1/2" sockets. Any idea on the size of the sockets for the lug nuts, the Bulldog coupler and any bolts/nuts on the Dexter EZ Flex?
    1 point
  3. Nitrogen filled tires for the average application are more or less a scam , just use air and don't fret about a non-issue. I used to fill high performance jet aircraft tires with N2 when I was an A&P, since it is bone dry and marginally better at staying at a set pressure during wild temperature swings, but all the smaller planes got good old shop air.... It is best to use air that has gone through an effective moisture separator, especially in a humid climate. You really don’t want water inside your tires, since it can corrode the wheels and valve stems. If you have a small compresso
    1 point
  4. From Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmosphere_of_Earth : "By volume, dry air contains 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen, 0.93% argon, 0.04% carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases. Air also contains a variable amount of water vapor, on average around 1% at sea level, and 0.4% over the entire atmosphere." I assume that if you kept on filling with air, you'll just be gradually increasing the percentage of Oxygen and other gasses until you reach a state equivalent to pure air. Or not. Just spit-balling...
    1 point
  5. I don't consider it a $150 wrench, but a $150 accurate insurance policy, which is ever so important for those of us with only one wheel on each side.
    1 point
  6. Water was coming in between the porch light and hull probably entering through mounting bolt holes or hole for electrical wire on our older style light. When sealing the older style porch lights like we have, 3M 4000 Marine sealant or Marine silicone sealant can be used. This sealant is not used on black gaskets that I believe you have. Your porch lights have a black gasket between the light and hull. It's possible water could enter the hull if your gasket is not sealing properly and Captain Tolley's might stop it, after reading information about this product. When you visit Oliver they
    1 point
  7. I had previously applied Capt. Tolley's crack sealer to the gasket around each porch light (to stop streaking), and a second time to the porch light above the window that leaked, before going through the above exercise. Is that what you mean by 're-sealing', or something else?
    1 point
  8. We have early style porch lights, not sure if this would apply to later style porch lights. Water was coming in from the porch light between shells dripping from the top of the dinette window. When we resealed the porch light over the window, fixed the problem. Saw another leak from the rear Oliver sign, leaking between shells traveling around the rear window and dripping from the bottom of the window on the curbside bed. Once we found the leaks, fixed them without further problems.
    1 point
  9. We experienced the same problem: the weep holes were clear, as were the channels, but still had a wet bed on the driver's side after a storm. Yesterday, I pulled the Ollie to our house, and my wife trained a hose on the suspect window. It took a while, but rivulets appeared in several spots running down the side of the interior below the window frame. The frame is caulked, but there were several breaks in the caulk through which the water ran. I cleaned out the existing caulk as well as I could, and re-caulked the entire bottom of the window frame. We had a storm last night; this mornin
    1 point
  10. I wanted to offer a few suggestions for removing the window seals and tracks. Please read the entire message first as my writing style is a little disjointed. And if you think it tough to read, you should be grateful you don’t have to think like this.? First off, only do this if you feel you can’t clean the tracks and drain slots with brushes, vacuums and compressed air. It takes me about 30 minutes to remove and replace the seals, minus the drying time for the seals. Removing the outside seal for the fixed glass track is pretty simple, I used a metal pick to raise the seal enough
    1 point
  11. Missing pictures from original posting. I hope?
    1 point
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