Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/17/2021 in all areas

  1. Of the present 17 Maine Oliver Owners, 10 were in attendance. 2 folks were awaiting delivery. Pretty good attendance percentage for the first ever event in Maine. As with the general camping crowd, the Maine Oliver Owner's are great frendly people. There was a lot of sharing of ideas by everyone. The weather was great. Two days in the low 90's and the remainder of the week and weekend were in the high 60's or low 70's. Great weather for us Mainers. Attached are a few pictures of: - The campground and the Ollies, - Common meetings at night at the fire pit, - Pot luck meal together, - At the Archers on the Pier restaurant in Rockland on Wednesday night. It was great for this Ollie newby to meet everyone from all over Maine. I learned a lot about things Oliver. Thanks to All! Richard
    5 points
  2. I decided to brighten up the area behind the sink by adding a nice backsplash in a brushed steel finish. I bought the backsplash at Menards but they are available on Amazon. They come in a variety of finishes. I used two packs. The beauty was in the peel and stick feature. They are about a foot long and can be cut with a jig saw.. Although I used a dremel cutoff wheel which worked fabulous. I also used a sanding tip on the dremel to finish the edges nicely. The area to the left of the sink was tricky and slightly uneven so I used a good glue and leveled that area first. I plan to seal with clear silicone on the top and bottom edges. I'm pleased with the result!
    4 points
  3. Mike, you’d been looking for recommendations for campgrounds in Maine a couple weeks back... Lobster Buoy Campground should be on your list of potential places. It is a nice no frills little campground in a beautiful location in the Midcoast... If you ended up staying there and put the word out, you might find yourselves surrounded by local Ollies, as in the photos above...
    2 points
  4. John, You really started something by sending me the pictures of the Black Series independent suspension several years ago. After buying one, I started a business selling the Australian McHitch articulating trailer hitches, where I am now the exclusive US distributor. I think I mentioned all of this to you before, but I'm still amazed at what an influence you had on me! Sheesh. The Black Series (BS) trailers are basically a very good design that is rugged and capable, while being extremely comfortable inside. But the company has quality control issues and always has. And on top of that, they are very difficult to deal with. I have done a lot of work on mine to fix a lot of things that were either not assembled correctly, or were just poor quality to begin with. Brakes, wheel bearings, the breakaway system, inverter, poor wiring, bad wheel alignment, shocks, and a host of nagging little things that should have been better. But some of it is me, as I will work to fine tune things that can be made better. Now, BS seems to be cheapening them by cutting corners with the upholstery, and removing interior lights, while using no name heaters and inverters that have no parts availability at all. All the while being very arrogant and unwilling to improve their clumsy workmanship. Ours sold for 20% more than we paid for it! Which reimbursed me for the original sales tax, the licensing and insurance for two years, all of the improvements I made and most of the fuel purchased to pull it 17,000 miles! This market is crazy! Mine was dialed in and a very good trailer with proven reliability and proven desert performance. But, as mentioned in my previous post, it is heavy and complicated. I decided that something lighter and easier to pull, with a better galley, much better cold weather performance, and much higher build quality, was what I wanted. The Xplore just seems like a much easier trailer to use and tow, that will be more fun and less trouble overall. I just want to use it and not redesign it. I want to go in the winter with no worry about freezing, which has always been a problem wit the HQ19. The Xplore is designed to be used down to 40 below in Wisconsin winters. That means it will be excellent in the summer too, and very easy to keep cool. The suspension can raise or lower 8" for highway travel, sneaking into the garage, or exploring rocky roads. This does not affect the suspension travel as it is a torsion system. The outer tube of the torsion axle is tucked up into the frame, and it is rotated to adjust the ride height with a hydraulic pump, cylinders and levers. It works with a remote similar to a garage door remote, on the keychain, that can be activated from the driver's seat while moving or stopped. The tires are 33 X 10.5 X 15 Maxxis. They can be aired way down for sand or trail as needed. The frame is a very nice powder coated 2" X 6" steel box structural tube design with a perimeter frame that can be jacked up anywhere along its length and protects the body from rocks. No pipes or tanks are below the frame and it has steel skid plates under the tanks. Ducted heat also has ducts that run to the tanks for freeze protection. Roof is arched, cannot collect water, and is designed for foot traffic. Roof is R24, walls R13 and floor R11. The body structure is aluminum frames with Crane Noble fiberglass panels inside and out. It has a 10 cu ft fridge that is compressor driven, not absorption. 480 AH of lithium batteries inside where the cold will not bother them, 380 watts of solar with MPPT charge controller, full battery status monitoring and 2,000 watt inverter. Built in air compressor. Beautiful wood cabinets with locking latches that cannot open while driving, Corian countertop, three burner stove with oven, vent hood, T and G varnished knotty pine ceiling, dry flush toilet with no black tank, a dry bath with large shower and full headroom of 6' 5" throughout. The V nose allows this. So, we'll be back on the road pretty soon. Still hoping to crash the Oliver rally next year. And we'll be traveling this winter too, as long as we can avoid snow storms. Take care, John (Raspy)
    2 points
  5. We are HH members, but have yet to stay at one of their locations. I'm guessing the merger will make it easier to search for sites, with only one interface. That being said, anything remotely related to RV life is so unpredictable amid the Covid pandemic; where you once could have a reasonable anticipation of campground availability according to time of year, day of the week, and location, now it is hard to travel without advance reservations. I blame some of this on the Internet which seems to be taking advantage of the surge in RV campers by posting a lot of hype on popular destinations, and even some not so popular ones, in order to bring in advertiser $$$$. I'm hoping, when schools are back in session and workers return to their offices, the situation will improve. We rely a lot on Campendium to find some lesser know campgrounds.
    2 points
  6. Two years ago we sold our Oliver and bought a Black Series HQ19. It was a huge change. Two trailers could not be much different. Our Ollie, Hull 92 was a wonderful trailer and we went across the Country twice, to two Oliver Rallies, and visited 22 states. But it was not intended to be an off road trailer and we wanted something with a few differences inside, that was more rugged and prepared for off-road use. Enter the HQ19. It has been a wonderful trailer too, but I've worked on it a lot. Some optional and many things not so optional. It went to the trails in Moab, Colorado mining roads, Death Valley, Whitmore Canyon and a lot of other severe places with no problems related to off-road use. But it is heavy, tall and MUCH harder to pull than an Oliver. So now, we've gone to a trailer that offers the best of both. Extreme winter performance, no underneath plumbing, full headroom throughout including the dry bath, 1500 lbs lighter than the Black Series and about the same as the Oliver, better streamlining than the Black Series, but not as good as the Oliver, a full galley with oven, three burner stove, hood and Corian countertop. Lots of cabinets and a big pass through storage. A dinette that will seat three and not have the cushions fly off while driving, and a queen size bed. It has hydraulic adjustable ride height and torsion style independent suspension. Large off-road tires with two spares and an on-board air compressor. It will have 480 AH of Lithium batteries with their Off-Grid package and at least 380 watts of solar. I still look back very fondly at the time we had with the Oliver, and the friends we made here and at the Rally. Take care everyone, Raspy Here's a review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUP9nK-zGhA&t=113s&ab_channel=RVsofAmericaBlackSeriesXploreTaxaOff-Road
    1 point
  7. It would seem that the forum software doesn't understand the .heic photo format, which is used for HEIF photos. I believe iPhones now default to HEIF photos, but will export photos as jpegs, which are compatible with the forum, unless you specify otherwise. For example, if you're on a Mac, and export from the Photos app using the "Export Unmodified Original" option, you'll end up with a .heic file, assuming you took the photo with an iPhone. If instead, you choose "Export", or just drag the photo from Photos directly into your post, which is the easiest way, then you'll end up with a jpeg and your photos should post fine.
    1 point
  8. An interesting concept for sure and timing is key. Somehow hit the hot climates when not while also missing the snow in the 4 season regions. I would have to think about it some as there are places where I don't want to go back. Once was enough. R
    1 point
  9. Seeing all the lower 48 in one trip would be much like hiking the PCT from Canada to Mexico. Timing is a big priority. I doubt we could do a lower 48 road trip in a year . . . . we tend to visit a new place and stay longer than planned in order to see as much as possible, since we might not make it back that way again . . . . . .Maybe an exploratory trip first, then another to return to discovered places you didn't see the first go-round. I'm sure there are members here who have some experience with coast to coast treks. Anxious to hear reports.
    1 point
  10. I've seen Dr. Olson's map before, and it's an interesting route. But, I'd want a year, or more, to drive and enjoy camping along the way. Another idea might be multiple trips, branching out from the center? Sometimes, we'll drive five or 600 miles in a day, to get to a destination, then not move for days, or weeks, or, wander slowly for a month after. All depends on time and availability.
    1 point
  11. I bought the KTT mattresses this spring for my used twin bed Ollie which came with cushionis. After sleeping on my boat (with upgraded mattesses) for 10 year, I wanted mattresses not cushions. There is nothing better than a good nights sleep. I got the KTT mattresses a little firmer than standard and they are the best and it is like sleeping on my mattress at home, which I also love. I think the KTT's are well worth the investment if you plan on sleeping in the Ollie for extended times. They are a little heavy but not as heavy as my home mattress. Not sure what the weight of the standard floor plan mattress (mattresses) is but you could call KTT and find out how many mattresses make up the standard floor plan (maybe two) and what the weight of each is.
    1 point
  12. My favorite gizmos, in no particular order. Rooftop solar, plus home made "portable solar", from cheap Coleman panels. My conical shape tea kettle, plus pourover coffee cone. At our camping property, the $100 ecotemp shower/water heater. Has worked for 13 seasons, with one small part replacement. This year's fave, as we are camping a lot on our property, this year, a redneck deck from reused dock boards, and pt stringers, in three sections. 8 x 12 in total. Keeps our feet dry in the rain. Will make a great tent platform someday . 5 gallon stackable water jugs, bought many years ago.
    1 point
  13. Welcome! I'm just over the mountain from you near Brevard, NC. If you need something - don't hesitate to give me a shout. Bill
    1 point
  14. I always get notifications from the web site Roadtrippers. They have planed trips that expand across the country with stops along the way campgrounds places to visit. I personally have not done this but some of the trip planing looks very interesting. When the wife and I made a cross country trip there was no real planning head west back east down south. Most of the scenic ventures were by word of mouth, by the locals or by people you meet at the campgrounds. What ever way you do it its all good.
    1 point
  15. Original cushions and foam toppers have worked great for us.. wasn’t expecting them to but figured we’d give it a try.. glad we did.
    1 point
  16. 1 point
  17. RB You have highlighted the fourth benefit of a private CG that most do not consider. 1. Unlimited Water 2.Unlimited Sewer discharge. 3.Unlimited Power. 4. Right to refuse service.... I remove, or have them removed, instantly without prejudice. To your point, It is a shame how some people treat public lands, enforcement is seldom present or practiced. I do not know if more funding would help this situation in todays world. Dan
    1 point
  18. Sorry for your issue,, orca We've camped in odd places , around the world, without a builtin toilet. Usa, Australia, Iceland, etc. Luggage loo, thunder down under. Basically a five gallon bucket with a seat and a snap on lid to seal it. It's not necessarily pretty, but it works. Another alternative. If anyone else has a failure. ( I've not heard of this type of failure, til today, which makes me think it's pretty rare .) You can also use a trash bag in the toilet, with gel powder, and dispose of the bags .Or, drive to the nearest camping world, and get it fixed Or, a portapotty. Or, go to home depot or lowes, buy a flange, and modify it based on the old one. Might have to buy a cheap file . The last would likely be my first option. Everyone makes their best decisions, based on personal options and skills. Having my trailer trucked across the country, by some stranger, would truly be my last choice.
    1 point
  19. No matter what power source you use, 30a shore power, generator or inverter/battery power, you should better understand power management. Your Oliver camper was designed with the 30amp power in mind so your factory installed components are designed to work within the constraints of 30 amps. The inverter option that we currently offer can provide about 15 amps of power to the 120v receptacles before it will max out and shut down. Generators can vary based on their rating but they will be constrained to the 30 amp max that the camper is designed for. How does this impact you or your style of camping? Campground Camping with 30a Shore Power What happens if you go over the 30 amps? The breaker will kick just like at home if you turn to many appliances on in a single room. This situation typically will only occur when you are plugging in high power demanding appliances or devices in the camper. Every appliance that you want to add to your camper should first be checked to see how many amps are required to power it. Many hair dryers can pull 1800 watts of power which will immediately take up about half of your available power. Add in a space heater and it may just put you over the limit. What this means is that you must be conscientious of what is plugged in and pulling power. The worst thing that could happen is it would kick the breaker and you would simply reset it and turn some things off that aren’t being used at the moment. Boondocking with Generator Power When you are connected to a generator power source you are limited within the 30 amps but also the max amp that the generator will put out. A typical 2000-watt generator will only supply 15-16 amps of power so this means the max power is limited to the generator and if you are demanding more than the generator can supply it will kick the breaker on the generator. The generator may continue to run but will not be supplying power into the camper. Some of the components in the camper like the Dometic Penguin II A/C will demand much of this power especially when the compressor engages (Start Phase). The optional MicroAir Easy Start does help to contain this short fast burst of power to about 11 amps but that is about 75% of what the 2000-watt generator supplies. Once the compressor moves into the run phase it requires less power and drops to about 9 amps. The compressor will continue to run until the cabin temperature reaches the requested temperature on the thermostat. The compressor will then disengage or shut down. Once the cabin temperature drops below a certain threshold the compressor will once again enter the starting phase which requires 11 amps of power. This is where you may run into an issue that is normal. You may have a coffee maker running or a laptop plugged in or a combination of any other type of added appliance that under the compressor running stage falls just under the max 15-16 amps provided by the generator but when the compressor re-enters the starting phase it can cause it to jump over the max long enough to kick the breaker on the generator. No worries, all you need to do is practice power management and unplug something temporarily and reset the breaker. TIP: When using a generator, the surge protector may see it as an ungrounded power supply and stop all power from entering the camper. The best resolution for this is to plug in a neutral ground plug into the 120v receptacle on the generator. Boondocking with the Inverter The optional inverter is a 2000-watt Xantrex inverter but it actually only supplies about 1800 watts of power. If you remember from earlier, we mentioned that many hair dryers require 1800 watts of power. Power hungry appliances they are! This means you are even more limited to what you can use at the same time or even by itself. The inverter is connected to the 120v receptacles and also the microwave. The microwave by itself will pull most of the power supplied by the inverter so when running the microwave on inverter power be sure not to have other things plugged in and running. Also keep in mind that the inverter is dependent on battery power. The inverter pulls battery power and converts it into 120v power. So, with this option you must manage both the available battery power and inverter power. For instance, the microwave under 120v power uses 12 amps but the converted rate from 12v battery to 120v through the inverter actually means you are using about 135 amps. Has this gotten a bit confusing yet? Putting it simply, you manage the 12 amps required by the microwave from 120v to the available amps of 15 amps provided by the inverter. With the 135 amps you simply need to know that this is draining the batteries at a much faster rate as they cannot sustain that rate of power consumption for too long before loss of 12v power would occur. However, the inverter will shut down before total power loss from the 12v battery system will occur as it requires at least 10.5v for it to operate. The good news is that the microwave is usually only used for short periods of time. You would however want to apply this way of thinking to other appliances that you may want to use while on inverter power so that you better manage the available power.
    1 point
  20. I feel Csevel's pain for sure. While I have not had a leak to deal with, my 2021 E2 has been keeping me busy since picking it up last December. Off the top of my head the issues I've dealt with includes: 1) tank sensor fell off fresh water tank, 2) malfunctioning heat pad for lithium batteries (still to be replaced), 3) Xantrex was set to AGM batteries instead of the lithium package I had causing multiple issues 4) radio/tv anteana was not attached to mast correctly so fell off while driving, 5) leaky pex connectors under curb side bed - connections were way too loose 6) exterior LP leak (still to be tracked down), 7) Xantrex remote ongoing panel warning 20 issue, 8) no pressure in the water pressure tank, 9) super loud and clanky air conditioner - loose bolt found just below the impeller, 10) fridge could not get cold enough to function - sensor placed in wrong position, 11) faulty board in Maxair fan, 12) loose nuts attaching solar panels. I'm fairly sure I've forgotten a couple more. This is my first trailer and I appreciate that complex systems in bouncy conditions (trucks, trailers, boats, space station, etc...) are prone to shake related malfunctions but most of the problems I've had seem to be of other sources. Upside is I'm learning the systems in combat conditions. Downside is, I'd rather be camping. Question to you more seasoned Oliver-ites: Does this seem like an excessive list for a trailer that is just 6 months old? However you cut it, this stuff is a pain in the ass but has not yet cut a trip short or forced us to loose the camper to a service center. We love having our Oliver but wish it would be less of a ongoing maintenance issue.
    0 points
×
×
  • Create New...