Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
John E Davies

This is why we buy Olivers, owner wrecks new trailer 20 minutes after buying

Recommended Posts

“Check your brake adjustment lady?” Easy access to those screw adjusters:

 

1AB7858B-88AF-46AB-8ABB-C0308A858195.jpeg.f33f780121aef24e6625b439781905a6.jpeg

 

An appalling look at the floor STRUCTURE, random widths of thin pine boards. There is a lot of rust on those frame rails, but I am surprised that they were painted at all:

 

D90FDEBA-A23B-4638-8190-BB5A3E11155D.jpeg.c5d9cf01353fa0ad3ae49ea384fb772f.jpeg

 

Full story, the trailer “started to sway and she lost control”: ... http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5894941/amp/Washington-couple-wreck-tractor-trailer-20-minutes-purchase.html

 

I still want to see pics of wrecked Olivers, but nobody has posted any.

 

It’s nearly noon, we are parked at a Lake Wenachee State Park campground, waiting until we can check in to the nearby NW Overland Rally at 2:00 pm. I will post a few pics in a new thread, but I will have limited cell coverage. I do not expect to see many trailers like the one pictured in this thread.

 

C08ADE55-8103-4F20-88E3-7E7057109D42.thumb.jpeg.fa3bd78fc5312cab513a2f9b2180e2e2.jpeg

 

It’s a little breezy at the beach, with breaking waves and steady 20 mph winds. A very pretty spot when the wind dies down. It is not a lake that is friendly to paddlers.

 

D491DAA3-7642-4590-BFC8-A4A16E28BFF5.thumb.jpeg.8beac9f36ae689b829324abfd65e5a1a.jpeg

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

  • Thanks 1

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, John, that is a gorgeous location! And this is the first time I've seen a picture of your dogs. Doodles!

  • Thanks 1

Chris & Duke Chadwell
🐾Maddie & Baxter🐾
Elite II Hull 292
2017 F-150 Lariat 3.5 EB 4x4 Lakeland, FL 

 

2019TravelMap.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With all due respect and gentle kindness.

 

Apparently, you are saying that an Oliver would not flip over?

Or are you saying that if an Oliver flipped over there would be no damages or just a few scratches or minimal damage?

Do your insurance rates reflect your point of view?

 

I'm all for reasonable and sensible advocacy for an Oliver or an Airstream, as opposed to cheaper trailers on the market.

My personal considerations for considering buying an Oliver include a lot of factors, mostly in the realm of quality and quality control.

 

But, having spent a good five or six years in depth, I mean deep in depth, on a variety of RV forums, which included a wide variety of trailers, tow vehicle, and motorhome mishaps, I really have no clue what your point is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://olivertraveltrailers.com/blog/is-travel-trailer-insurance-necessary/

 

Reading the below from the Oliver website, I see no representation that an Oliver is better or any less destructible than any other trailer when it comes to mishaps or that an owner can not suffer a total loss.

 

If you want to argue that Oliver owners are better at choosing appropriate towing vehicles, better drivers, better at avoiding accidents, and maintaining their Oliver, will never have to worry about fire, rust damage, water damage, totaling their trailer in an accident, that would be an interesting discussion and the trailer is probably worth twice what it costs new.

 

"When considering new travel trailers for sale, many people forget to take insurance into consideration. Although it is not a requirement in any state for fiberglass travel trailers to carry insurance, they can be very expensive assets. It would be very foolhardy for anyone not to properly insure one, no matter what the value or the size. If the trailer is being purchased with any sort of financing, the finance company may require insurance. Even if it doesn’t and the trailer is a total loss, the finance company will still be owed the entire outstanding balance of the loan.

 

Some automobile policies will provide basic coverage for a trailer, for others it needs to be specifically added on. Some auto policies specifically exclude trailers. Before looking into what additional coverage may or may not be needed or wanted, it is important to check with the existing insurance company to find out exactly what the policy covers.

 

Once the limits of the existing policy are known, consideration can be given to what additional coverage is appropriate. For a small, secondhand pop-up trailer which costs a few hundred dollars, it may not be worthwhile to purchase additional insurance. However, some fiberglass travel trailers can cost tens of thousands of dollars, often more than the value of the vehicle towing it. For these, a fully comprehensive trailer policy is the smartest option. As with any insurance, you hope you never need it, but it is essential to have in place if you ever do.

 

There are several different types of travel trailer insurance offered which depend on the usage. There are policies which cover extensive road use, for example, and others where the trailer is occupied full-time for all or part of the year. The only situation generally not covered by a specialist trailer insurance policy is where the trailer is parked full-time.

 

After determining the appropriate type of policy for the trailer’s intended usage, the items which can covered are similar to those in an automotive insurance policy. These include:

 

– Total loss replacement

– Liability coverage for personal injuries

– Collision coverage

– Comprehensive coverage for loss from fire, theft or severe weather

– Coverage for personal possessions

– Roadside assistance

– Emergency expenses

– Parked trailer coverage

 

The last item is especially important to consider. Parked trailer coverage provides insurance while your trailer is parked in an RV site or campground and everyone is away, hiking or biking for example.

 

This is not intended to be a comprehensive list of all of the reasons that insurance should be considered when looking at new travel trailers for sale. It is also not intended to be a comprehensive list of all of the reasons to have trailer insurance or the risks to be insured. What it is intended to do is to provoke some thought about how best to get some peace of mind while enjoying a new travel trailer.

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe he's referring to the inherent strength of an oliver, they tow extremely well, with a low center of gravity and if they are involved in a crash I don't think they'll self destruct like the stick and staple trl in those photos. All trailers are susceptible to sway, and given the right circumstances any of them will roll.

Steve


STEVEnBETTY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lake Wenachee State Park looks like a beautiful campground & one we will add to our list. Thank you for sharing!


Chris & Duke Chadwell
🐾Maddie & Baxter🐾
Elite II Hull 292
2017 F-150 Lariat 3.5 EB 4x4 Lakeland, FL 

 

2019TravelMap.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
With all due respect and gentle kindness.

Apparently, you are saying that an Oliver would not flip over?

Or are you saying that if an Oliver flipped over there would be no damages or just a few scratches or minimal damage?

Do your insurance rates reflect your point of view?

I’m all for reasonable and sensible advocacy for an Oliver or an Airstream, as opposed to cheaper trailers on the market.

My personal considerations for considering buying an Oliver include a lot of factors, mostly in the realm of quality and quality control.

But, having spent a good five or six years in depth, I mean deep in depth, on a variety of RV forums, which included a wide variety of trailers, tow vehicle, and motorhome mishaps, I really have no clue what your point is.

 

 

The main things I got out of it were:

 

John jokingly mentioned the easy access to the brakes while the trailer is upside down. And he pointed out the very poor constuction. These seem to be the two points he wanted to make, while sharing a dramatic photo. Sorry you are having trouble understanding.

 

That trailer was poorly built. Demonstrated not only because it came apart in a crash, but look at the poor frame, the poor subfloor and the total destruction from rolling over. I would expect an Oliver to be totaled to, in a rollover, but not turn into a pile like that. That sticky would never last, under normal usage, like an Oliver. Looking at the differences in the quality of construction brings that fact home.

 

Who knows why that trailer got out of control? Olivers are known for being very stable. We don't know the details or the TV, so we can't conclude much there.

 

Having working brakes is critical and knowing how to use them is also critical. Sway was mentioned and brakes cure sway.

 

Your attack on John seems unreasonable. Challenging him for an explanation on what he meant, with supporting data, while he merely showed a destroyed sticky and pointed out some obvious problems with it. I find it interesting and sobering to see how a cheap sticky just collapses. Don't you?

  • Thanks 2

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was a Jeep Grand Cherokee.

 

I didn't read anything about them not having insurance... RogerS do you happen to sell insurance?


Randy


One Life Live It Enjoyably


2017 F350 6.7L SRW CC LB


2015 Oliver Elite II Hull #69

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
With all due respect and gentle kindness.

Apparently, you are saying that an Oliver would not flip over?

Or are you saying that if an Oliver flipped over there would be no damages or just a few scratches or minimal damage?

 

I don’t know if John meant to imply that an “Oliver would not flip over” but I do know I didn’t gather that. Of course, simple physics would dictate that anything will flip over if enough lateral force is applied.

 

Reading...from the Oliver website, I see no representation that an Oliver is better or any less destructible than any other trailer when it comes to mishaps...

 

Obviously, any manufacturer that claimed in writing what you said would be opening up a can of litigious worms. But to add some information as to what would happen to an Oliver if it were involved in an accident I can offer a few facts.

 

There have been “several” incidents involving Oliver’s. One accident involved the coach flipping over and sliding down the pavement for some distance. When the wrecking company personnel finished putting the Oliver back on its tires they commented that they had NEVER seen a trailer survive an accident that took it off its wheels. In fact, the owner continued on his way albeit with some serious road rash. So yes, there is evidence “that an Oliver is better or any less destructible than any other trailer when it comes to mishaps...”

 

We understand that you are looking to buy and are (wisely) exploring choices. An Oliver Travel Trailer is different from other trailers in so many ways it’s hard to enumerate them all. We are all here to answer any questions or address any concerns.

 

Good luck in your quest.

  • Thanks 1

Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm retired.

 

My point about insurance is not about having or not having, but how much it costs comparatively. If the trailer is so wonderful in avoiding rollovers and accident damages, the insurance rates should be reduced compared to other trailers...called a reality check.

 

Poor construction and poorly built are opinions that mean nothing to me without the specifics. Poorly built can mean several different things - quality of materials, quality of putting the materials together, or quality controls for verifying quality at all levels of construction. For example, the Airstream mfg, dealers, and their owners constantly represent conclusions/opinions on quality of materials and quality controls, but it takes a lot of work to break down the specifics and compare them to other trailers. When you do, it is not so simple and not all blue sky and happiness.

 

When rolled the interior and exterior of an Airstream collapses as an empty can would if stepped on. I have not seen a picture of a rolled Oliver for comparison and I did look on the internet for such pictures.

 

I would say the apparent relative number of units on the road between Airstream and Olivers means I would expect to more easily find examples of this for Airstreams. My quick research indicated that Oliver crashes are difficult to find on YouTube. That can be because they are non-existent or simply have not yet been posted, but also because there would be less instances due to the relative on-the-road numbers. I don't know.

 

As to trailer brakes, the big reason for having a diesel engine with an exhaust brake is the importance of engine braking relative to trailer braking going downhill as I understand it. Certainly, when studying the big 5th trailers that was critical. In other words, one of the reasons I like the z71 and zr2 is that the diesel engine for that truck does have an exhaust brake. On my list of worries, control going down hill is very important. Yes, the brakes on the trailer are also important. Sway is important, etc. And as I understand it for off-road, the diesel on the z71 adds a lot of useful torque for getting out of and over traction problems.

 

A comparative on construction. Born free motorhomes, and Born Free last I looked has gone out of business, their big advantage, as they represented it among other things, was a heavy steel rollover cage. I am not aware that Olivers have that, right? and...having a rollover cage may help a lot with personal safety but that doesn't mean the trailer or motorhome won't be totaled.

 

I'm not sorry I'm having trouble understanding. I am use to talking with smart and knowledgeable people who are not often challenged...and usually benefit from just stating their opinions and having others respectfully act on their advice and nod their heads in agreement...but are not always on top of their game...nor can explain or back up their opinions/conclusions.

 

I have no problem challenging John because he gave me the impression of someone who is a stand up guy, and doesn't have to to be babied or have others run cover for him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suggest we stop the combative posts right here. This isn’t that sort of forum.

 

To answer your first question, I doubt there are enough Olivers on the road or for long enough for insurance companies to have evaluated their relative risk and be able to offer discounts. And I doubt that the market is valuable or competitive enough for them to do so anyway. Frankly, I wouldn’t look at insurance rates to tell you how roadworthy one trailer is relative to another.

 

Likewise, you will have to accept logic and anecdotal evidence for the stability and strength of Olivers. If you need statistics to make your decision, then you’re going to be out of luck since none exist. As posted earlier, we do have evidence of one Oliver that slid into a bridge railing in the snow, which did flip and I understand was able to be repaired. We also have stories of a bear unsuccessfully trying to get in an Ollie, though I have to question how motivated of a bear it was, lol. Plus I think it was trying the wrong door if I remember the story.

 

As for stability, all I know is that I’ve had zero issues and have heard nothing but the same from other owners. I’ve never read nor heard of anyone encountering sway with an Oliver, regardless of what tow vehicle they use. That doesn’t mean it can’t happen, but it’s good enough evidence of their stability for me.

  • Thanks 6

Snowball • LE2 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While some people scour RV forums for information, reviews, and the millions of opinions they provide, others gain their experience through hands on ownership, actual walk throughs (a weekend in one), perhaps spending hours at the factory. In either case, opinions are formed, all valid, some not very accurate.

 

Some of us, having spent decades in high end manufacturing, some with experience actually building van conversions, and living in them thorough out North America, can separate the wheat from the chaff, when perusing the various opinion sites., some never do.

 

The numerous Oliver owners I have actually talked to, and questioned, were as a group very well informed and educated about their RV and the competition. Many are what I call experienced tinkerers, with backgrounds in engineering, trades, etc. They are always looking to make something "better", a sort of - if it isn't broke, break it - mentality. I too suffer from this malady, and have slowly learned to accept less than ideal.....somethings are just not that important....

 

As we began to understand what we wanted in a RV - one that would be as versatile and accommodating for our travel/explorer lifestyle as we envisioned, I started with a checklist, highly set on a super C with off road capability, one with good attention to detail, and quality construction. I ended up at Oliver, as it fit the bill for everything I wanted except for being a 4WD, with a chassis of its own. Unfortunately, all the others I considered, and looked at, were just second rate attempts at building a quality product. My comments after viewing the build process "If I was to build a TT, it would be similar - Oliver meets about 90% of my design criteria" After leaving the Oliver factory tour we visited several RV dealers, to compare product. Validation is a powerful tool. We ordered an EII. And I'll pull it with a well matched off road capable 4wd truck. Gives us what we wanted - in a little different setup.

 

 

Oliver's are not perfect, thus the tinkerers, they are expensive, they are scarce (less than 400 on the road), and like the early Fords, you get them this way, or that way, with few options. Don't like it, buy something else. Want a used one - if you can find one - it will still be expensive. That's the market speaking.

 

Oliver owners, and the participants on this forum, in my view anyways, try to tell it like they see it -have experienced it - - It would be inappropriate, I feel for me to second guess them, perhaps - even petty.

 

 

I get the pic's John posted, it wasn't an engineering evaluation. Having viewed the mating process of the two out and inner hulls of an Oliver, I'll put my money on any Oliver in a roll over verses a conventional similar size TT.

Respectfully, a future Oliver owner. #359 due very soon.

 

PS: I reserve the right to revise and Extend My Remarks ... RB

  • Thanks 7

Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"

ALAZARCACOFLIDMTNVNMOKORTNTXUTWAWYd56201524964bac5483378b34b491562080842sm.jpg

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger,

 

I think it's a false assumption that just because a trailer is built better, the rate will be lower. Olivers are much more expensive than a lot of other brands and that difference could easily offset the potential lower cost for quality. Airstreams are built better than a lot of others too, but they have vunerabilities that could make them more of a risk for insurance companies. An example of this is how easily they are damaged by hail.

 

The differences in quality and design are apparant with even a casual look and don't really require a lot ofsupporting data. Just take a look. The picture of the wreck bares this out well.

 

Diesel braking is a very nice feature and saves a lot of wear on the truck service brakes. It also means less brake fade. But it does not contribute to stability. If a trailer has a tendency to sway, any braking by the TV is likely to increase the problem. Swaying trailers are stabilized by applying the trailer brakes, either alone or at least more aggressively that the TV brakes. Trailers should never be towed without trailer brakes and all drivers should understand how and when to apply those brakes independently of the TV brakes. Engine braking is a completely separate issue.

 

I think you'll find you'll have a better experience here if you enter into a friendly discussion and not expect people to provide documentation for their opinions in order to gain your belief. You can take or leave any comments as you see fit. Most of us have had a lot of experience and picked Oliver for many good reasons. We've made a number of improvements and happily shared those. We've been through the factory and know the peole who work there. We've been involved in improving the trailers. In other words, we are not just blowing smoke or blindly promoting a poor product. You also must make a lot of decisions for yourself, based on facts you gather and weigh, that are not simply based on others comments. Welcome aboard.

  • Thanks 2

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As for Bornfree, it was a really nice class c. My company used one for copier demos back in the day. Early 80 s.

Sadly, they're not in business. There are many choices. First, you have to narrow the field. Trailer, van, class c.... It's daunting. We know.

Good luck in your search.

I can only comment based on my old school, 2008, now working on 11 years old....

I'm happy. But our camping styles could be vastly different...

Sherry.


2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I think it’s a false assumption that just because a trailer is built better, the rate will be lower."

That is not my assumption or point. Actually, if a trailer is better built, the trailer costs more to buy, which is true about Olivers, which means the insurance should be higher because the claim payoffs would be higher and the insurance rates higher.

 

However, if a trailer is less susceptible to rollovers and if the trailer is less susceptible to damage whether rolled over or not, and therefore the insurance company paid claims are less and the company, based on past experience data, can project lower claim payoffs for the future, then the insurance companies would offer lower insurance rates for that particular model/mfg.

 

State Farm has lower rates for good drivers because the paid claims are less for good drivers.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"First, you have to narrow the field."

The most important way for me to narrow the field was to rent a motorhome and take my wife on a trip.

After that trip, I knew a large motorhome or 5th/truck was out.

 

My choice is now down to a mid-sized truck z71 pulling an Oliver trailer, OR a Mercedes van/no toad for touring and ZR2 for light off-roading locally.

When the 2019s come out, I will decide.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The differences in quality and design are apparant with even a casual look and don’t really require a lot ofsupporting data. Just take a look. The picture of the wreck bares this out well."

 

Without seeing at least one overturned Oliver for comparison, overturned under similar conditions like at similar speeds, the picture alone is not persuasive to me. There are, in my opinion, a lot better ways to advocate for the Oliver's quality and design compared to the other choices out there. For example, a brake discussion, or a frame discussion, or as some pointed out the susceptibility of an Airstream to hail and other not uncommon events one may be subjected to vs an Oliver. An Airstream is a great trailer for comparisons on specific issues.

 

Anyway, if I buy a trailer, any trailer, I'm gonna assume that if it rolls it's toast...which is why this whole thread, from the start, has been more curious than useful to me. My Fly on the Wall thread has been the most valuable because the critical issue is, as always, the level of truck, a weight distribution hitch, sway, an exhaust brake, etc. relative to whether or not I should be pulling an Oliver with a Colorado or a larger truck.

 

At this point, a Mercedes van without a toad seems like a more appropriate solution for me...with a ZR2 as a fun vehicle for local activities and around the town...simply because of its mobility, simplicity of solution, and DIY options.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
“The differences in quality and design are apparant with even a casual look and don’t really require a lot ofsupporting data. Just take a look. The picture of the wreck bares this out well.”

Without seeing at least one overturned Oliver for comparison, overturned under similar conditions like at similar speeds, the picture alone is not persuasive to me. There are, in my opinion, a lot better ways to advocate for the Oliver’s quality and design compared to the other choices out there. For example, a brake discussion, or a frame discussion, or as some pointed out the susceptibility of an Airstream to hail and other not uncommon events one may be subjected to vs an Oliver. An Airstream is a great trailer for comparisons on specific issues.

Anyway, if I buy a trailer, any trailer, I’m gonna assume that if it rolls it’s toast…which is why this whole thread, from the start, has been more curious than useful to me.

 

I don't know of anyone claiming Olivers are better simply because they are likely to survive a rollover better. A rollover simply helps demonstrate how poorly some trailers are built. This doesn't have to be borne out by actual roll-overs. Just look for yourself at the construction of so many stickies and look at the construction of an Oliver. If it is not apparant that the Oliver is vastly superior, and you can't see it without an actual roll-over, then you should just buy the sticky and be done with deciding.

 

I certainly did not buy mine so that I could roll it and keep on going, but general sticky construction leads to so many deterioration problems over time and so many stuctural failures from normal use.

 

I suppose you could hold a piece of paper in one hand and a piece of steel plate in the other while arguing that you had insufficient data to show the paper was not as strong, and therefore you were unable to make up your mind which to hammer on. That's fine. But at some point, a common familiarity with materials is enough to favor the steel. Same with general trailer constuction. Just look at examples all around. Older ones that are falling apart. Rot problems, total destuction in wrecks, comments from owners that tow them. Go on a factory tour. In other words, do your own research and believe in what you see for yourself. Are stapled wood strips as strong a molded and re-inforced fiberglass? Are stapled aluminum strips as strong as a fiberglass outer shell? Is a rubber sheet roof as durable as fiberglass? Where will you find believable repotrs that demonstrate to you that a rubber sheet is as durable as heavy fiberglass? And why would you need such data, when you can simply hold each in your hand and see for yourself?

 

Seriously though, and again, if you feel there is no demonstable differences in strength and usefullness between an Oliver and a normal sticky, don't buy an Oliver. Why buy something that is twice the price and no better? Your decision must be based on what you think is best. Not us. And it seems we are not able or willing to supply you with sufficient data to support the idea that a sticky is structurally weaker, more prone to rot, UV damage, etc. What happens if nobody ever rolls an Oliver and you have refused to buy one until you can compare rollovers between a sticky and an Oliver? You'd be stuck, unless you used your own common sense and noticed the differences in construction.

 

Or, you can assemble your own report by buying a low priced sticky, and then another one and then another one, like so many of us have, and finding out how it goes over time. If you use them regularly, put a lot of miles on them, vist cold or wet climates, or keep one for a longer time, you'll have ample opportunity to form an opinion. I had three stickies before an Oliver. Maybe you should too.

 

As far as brakes are concerned, Olivers use a conventional Dexter electric brake system on solid axles with shocks. Same design as many others. But they are Dexter which is likely the best manufacturer. Oliver has recently upgraded to greaseable bushings and an Easy-Flex equalizer too. Airstream uses torsion axles. Most stickies us conventional axles with non serviceable nylon bushings.

 

Oliver has an aluminum frame that is unique in that it is specifically designed with the body and not just a platform to build on. It cannot rust. The frame works with the inherant and designed in strength of the body structure. There is no exposed wood underneath, just a fiberglass bottom exposed to the elements. All pipng and tanks are enclosed.

 

You should know most of this by now if you have been doing any serious research. Proving why each of these features is superior to most sticky designs is beyond the scope of this reply. Some things are obvious.

 

Good luck in your quest.

  • Thanks 2

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...Without seeing at least one overturned Oliver for comparison, overturned under similar conditions like at similar speeds, the picture alone is not persuasive to me...

 

The only ways I can interpret this statement is that you either did not read my post about the overturned Oliver or you read it and did not believe me. IF you didn’t believe what I said and need your own visual proof before making a purchase decision, then I submit you probably will never own an Oliver because you are unlikely to ever be in a position to witness such.

 

I believe you will be hard to please but I still wish you luck

 

I’m done...

  • Thanks 2

Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't speak for John about the introduction to this thread, but to me the most important question that has not been discussed is: why did this even happen? Its safe to say that thousands if not hundreds of thousands, maybe millions of all sorts of RV''s travel the country all year long. Some are stick built, some are fiberglass or a combination. And just as importantly many of these RV's travel in far worse weather conditions than what appears on these photos. So was this user error, as in someone might have been going way too fast, slam on the breaks or a litany of any other issues. Perhaps the tow vehicle was not well equipped. Worse yet maybe the RV dealer did not prep the camper properly. The long and short of it is, there are so many things that can go awry while towing any trailer.

 

To that I will add we have towed our Oliver in far worse weather and driving conditions than what seem to exist in these photos, and in a couple of cases some downright harrowing conditions with not a single issue albeit it might have been some white knuckle driving and towing.

 

We don't know the answer to any of these questions and may never found out, but until we do I'll hold off on any judgment. My suspicions however make me believe the driver or the tow vehicle were not up to the task, or the camper had not been properly prepped for delivery. Regardless in this camper did not hold up very well in a rollover, and honestly most others would not either. In all fairness most automobiles don't hold up well in a roll over from what I've seen.

 

That out of the way not all stick built trailers are made this cheaply either, based upon my own observations before purchasing an Oliver.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swaying trailers are stabilized by applying the trailer brakes, either alone or at least more aggressively that the TV brakes. Trailers should never be towed without trailer brakes and all drivers should understand how and when to apply those brakes independently of the TV brakes. Engine braking is a completely separate issue.

 

Yes, and just in case I don't have the time or the quick thinking needed to apply those brakes, I bought and installed the Hayes Sway Master, as have a few other Oliver owners:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Hayes-81775-Master-Electronic-Control/dp/B01GT91SY2

 

It seems to have helped us once already. We were in heavy traffic on a freeway in Scottsdale, AZ, when a teenage girl gabbing on a cell phone swerved into our lane. I swerved to avoid hitting her, and the Ollie's brakes were immediately applied. I don't know if the Sway Master avoided a disaster, but it sure feels good to know it is there.

 

IMG_6006.thumb.jpg.dbf6ebf88d1674d14485ac267e22e08e.jpg

  • Thanks 2

Onward through the Fog!


EarthPicks of Cochise County


AZCACOKSMONVNMORTNTXUTmed.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...