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JaquelynK

Viking composite cylinders??

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I am zeroing in on my Oliver order and wondering about the propane cylinders. I would kind of like to have the big cylinders, but the standard ones are pretty heavy for me. It would probably be easier to just carry more small ones and swap them out. Even easier if I could use the Viking composite cylinders. The larger ones might even be manageable for me so I could have the big tanks without the weight. Is anybody using those. When I did my plant tour it looked like they would not fit exactly in the standard mount, so some modification might be required to make sure they are secure and not rubbing. I would love to hear with anyone who is using those cylinders of any size. I have some at home that I love for the gas grill, and I would love to have a set of them for the Oliver.

 

On a similar topic, I'm thinking it would be better and maybe safer to refill my own cylinders versus using an exchange program. I read some unsettling stories online about those tanks that you get with an exchange program being leaky and maybe not even filled up correctly. While the convenience of an exchange is tempting, I don't want to have a leaky half full tank if I am boondocking in the winter somewhere.


Jaque

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We always refill our own tanks. It’s way cheaper (you only pay for what you get) and you’re always dealing with the same tanks. The best (cheapest) place we’ve found is TSC. I’m sure there are similar places in your neck of the woods.

 

At 12 pounds, the 22 pound Viking tank is roughly half the weight of a 30 pound steel tank but only holds about 2/3 the volume of propane and is about twice the cost. If weight is a major factor and cost and capacity are not, these would be a very good choice. Or a cheaper alternative would be to just go with two 20 pound tanks.

 

Good luck with your quest to make your new Oliver perfect. It’s fun and rewarding to see it come together to be uniquely yours.

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Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

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I specifically chose the 20 lb (standard) tanks for three reasons:

 

1.  I do not do very much cold weather camping.  However, during the summer I am camping at altitude and do use the propane for "some" heat.  Over the past three years this has never been a problem.  In fact, I've been surprised at how little propane I actually use given that the fridge is almost always using it.  I've done a 7 week trip on less than one tank.

 

2.  These tanks are easier to handle (versus the 30 lb ones).

 

3.  The most important reason (for me) - flexibility.  As ScubaRx mentions, I can always have these refilled as long as there is a place available to get this done.  If there isn't a place and I really need the propane I can always "swap them out" at gas stations, grocery stores, hardware stores, etc.  Obviously, refilling is the better option for many reasons, but, I like having the option of swapping and with the other tanks this is simply not available to you.

 

Certainly I like(d) the idea of the Viking ones but felt that the cost really didn't justify the lighter weight and restriction of not being able to swap them.

 

Bill

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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We have the 30lb tanks. They are heavy when full and take some effort to lift over the enclosure when replacing after a fill up. Since a 20lb tank holds about 5 gallons and a 30lb tank holds about 7 gallons, you don’t get that much more with the bigger tank. I would go with the smaller size for ease of lifting. There are lots of places to get tanks filled, Steve is right about Tractor Supply. We never exchange. Mike

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Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram Rebel 4X4 5.7L Hemi

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One option: get the 30 lb bottles and ask the propane person to partially refill them, say to 45 pounds total weight. The full bottle weighs about 55 pounds. That would make them easier to lug around, and if you had a serious winter trip you could get them fully filled, and get some help to put them back. This would give you some flexibility. In cold winter temperatures a nearly empty tank may cause issues with your appliances not lighting due to the pressure drop. Full (and bigger) tanks can help avoid this.

 

I have the big tanks and always top them up, and I have little problem lifting them, but as I get older I may start doing this.

 

I don’t think the composite tanks are worth the cost for a fixed installation. For portable tanks, they probably make a lot more sense. My ideal setup would be a compressor fridge and diesel fired marine appliances..... I hate propane and think it is very dangerous. I don’t understnd why there are not more accidents, but I suspect most go unreported, unless they level the camper. Then we get pictures on the Internet....

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

 

 

 

 

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

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Jaque,

 

Having the Elite1, I can not fit the 30# tanks so I figured I'd just carry an extra tank for early and late season, or extended trips. The three 20's will carry a little more propane than the two 30's. Yet another option, although very expensive, is to go aluminum tanks. IIRC, a full 30# aluminum tank weighs about the same as a full 20# steel tank. Vintage Trailer Supply has them, and you can order them with gauges as well: https://www.vintagetrailersupply.com/Aluminum-Propane-Tanks-s/1.htm

 

You'll find that propane really goes a long way in an Oliver. The extra insulation and the double hulls really make a tight unit. At least in my small Elite1, I barely get in to the second tank after two weeks of cold weather use. If you are still worried about running out, I'd just get an extra steel 20# tank.  Much cheaper than going aluminum or composite. I always refill my own tanks. I feel it's a far better option as far as safety and value. Propane is everywhere and easy to fill.  Good luck!

 

Dave

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2015 Oliver Elite, Hull 107


1998 Ford E-250, 5.4 liter

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For a portable BBQ, I like the Viking "See Inside" the cylinder to see how much propane is left.  However, I don't use them for my trailer.  There I want steel or aluminum tanks.  Too many OOPs, or an accident could more easily rupture the fiberglass Vikings.  I would not recommend the 30 pound cylinders due to their weight.  I do like Dave Phelp's recommendation of carrying a third 20 pound tank if you really need more fuel unless you are boondocking very high with extreme cold conditions.  For three season camping, I personally don't think it would be needed.  As such, recommend you try the two standard tanks out for a few trips.

 

Mahalo,   John

 

 

 

 

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Tug:  2019 F-150 SuperCrew Lariat, 3.5L EcoBoost, Max Trailer Tow, FX-4, 4X4, Rear Locker


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Another vote for standard 20 lb tanks... even though we have a composite lp tank in the boat.

 

Fiberglass or composite tanks can be difficult to get refilled, as some places have never seen them, and one brand was recalled five years ago... so, it really frightened a bunch of the smaller operators into refusing to fill any brand... making it much more difficult outside the marine communities.

 

The viking tanks need to be recertified every five years. If you look at their website, you'll find a good drive from many towns to a recertification center.

 

Sherry

 

 

 

 

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2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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Jaque,

 

The Wonder Egg was born 10 1/2 years ago with 30 pound propane tanks.  After seeing how efficient the Ollie's systems were, how long it took to deplete a tank, and also how much of a hassle it was wrangling the larger tanks out and in, I changed over to 20 pounders.  To even make it easier removing and replacing the tanks, I simply lower the nose of the trailer with the electronic hitch to its lowest level.  This makes a huge difference because you no longer need to lift the full tank as high to get it over the lip of the front cover when placing it back in the trailer.

 

You are gonna love your Ollie sooooo much!

 

Pete

 

 

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Pete & "Bosker".    TV -  '18 F150 Super-cab Fx4; RV  - "The Wonder Egg";   '08 Elite, Hull Number 014.


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Thanks for all the great advice as always. I'm going to go with the standard 20# tanks so I can lift them out of there until I am 90. I'll carry spares in the truck if I think I'll need a lot. I can use the composite tank I have now for portable things like the gas grille, a lantern, or a propane generator if I go that way. And I'll fill my own tanks whenever possible, exchanging only when desperate. One more thing checked off the list. Almost there.


Jaque

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To even make it easier removing and replacing the tanks, I simply lower the nose of the trailer with the electronic hitch to its lowest level. This makes a huge difference because you no longer need to lift the full tank as high to get it over the lip of the front cover when placing it back in the trailer.

 

SMH Brilliant Pete!


Chris & Duke Chadwell
🐾Maddie & Baxter🐾
Elite II Hull 292
2017 F-150 Lariat 3.5 EB 4x4 Lakeland, FL 

 

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To even make it easier removing and replacing the tanks, I simply lower the nose of the trailer with the electronic hitch to its lowest level. This makes a huge difference because you no longer need to lift the full tank as high to get it over the lip of the front cover when placing it back in the trailer.

SMH Brilliant Pete!

 

Duh. Why didn’t I think of this?

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Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram Rebel 4X4 5.7L Hemi

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