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On 12/16/2019 at 8:55 AM, ctshort09 said:

Trailer:  Elite II = Loaded trailer wt.  6250 lbs.
Tongue Wt: 630 LB  => requires an Anderson Wt. Dist. Hitch

Tow Vehicle: 2018 F150 4WD Super Crew with 3.5 EB & 3.55 rear end
Mods:  Have a canopy and installed SUMO Springs for overload/squat reduction and they work.

 

Tow Experience:  Grade B+   ( I'm sure a 3/4 ton would be an A+)
Feels stable in all but the most extreme conditions.
3.5 Ecoboost has PLENTY of power due to turbo...but ....it has a turbo which can be a big ticket repair in future.

Mileage: 
Towing from Tennessee to Everett (2500 miles) and in Western Washington have averaged 11 mpg overall.
In mountains typically got about 6-9 MPG, on Flats as high as 14 mpg.
Without the trailer but loaded with gear on the way out to pickup we got 20+ MPG on the highway.

Most extreme towing scenario:
High wind gusts (50MPH) through I-90 passes in Montana last summer.  
Felt a sideways wiggles and felt concerned for about 3 seconds, but the hitch + towing controls of F150 kicked in quickly.
I remember thinking...I wish the truck was heavier than the trailer during that situation.

Truck Stats:
GVWR = 7000 lbs.  Actual Curb Wt: 5200 lbs. Cargo Capacity:  Calculated  GVWR-Curb 1800 lbs
Door Sticker Cargo Capacity:  1557 lbs door sticker for tire rating.
Hitch:   F150 Factory Installed Receiver/Hitch as rated below:
     with Weight Dist. Hitch.....        Max Gross Trailer WT Rating 12,200lbs   has 1220lb Max Tongue Wt.
     without Weight Dist. Hitch.....  Max Gross Trailer WT Rating   5,000 lbs . has 500 lb Max Tongue Wt.

Hope this is a helpful post.

 

 



 

 

Hey Ctshort, did you install the Sumo Springs? I’ve heard good things about them and think this would be a good thing to install on our 2017 Tundra 1794. In the process of buying a 2014 Oliver Elite II, and plan on towing it with the Tundra.

Thanks,

Mike

 

Mike and Deb.  2014 Legacy Elite II  Hull Number 061 Twin Bed - Tow Vehicle 2017 Toyota Tundra

 

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We have a 2019 F-150 Lariat, 3.5 EcoBoost, FX4, Max Trailer Package, Anderson WDH.  Have about 17,000 trailer miles mostly out west in the Mountains where we para-glide.   My truck performance stat's

Trailer:  Elite II = Loaded trailer wt.  6400 lbs. Tongue Wt: 740 LB  => requires an Anderson Wt. Dist. Hitch Tow Vehicle: 2018 F150 4WD Super Crew with 3.5 EB & 3.55 rear end Mods:  H

I just purchased a 2020 Tundra and will be picking up my new Ollie in late July.  (I Hope).   I looked at GMC and Ford.  I liked the looks of the Dodge but a 2012 Jeep Rubicon that was the most undepe

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Mike:  (Mcmac)

I have the exact same set-up, but no Sumo or camper shell.  My experiences are simular to yours.  Only difference is I seeing 22 - 24 MPG flat land (Not Towing) running at 74 MPH.  I call my TV "The Beast".  Amazing truck.

Edited by Geronimo John

Tug:  2019 F-150 SuperCrew Lariat, 3.5L EcoBoost, Max Trailer Tow, FX-4, 4X4, Rear Locker

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"And now for something completely different....."   

Seems that most Ollie Elite II owners tow with a pickup truck, but I prefer an SUV to have the extra interior space in the TV.    I have an Ollie Elite II and was towing with a 2017 Ford Expedition EL with the 3.5l V-6 Eco-Boost.  Plenty of towing capacity (over 9,000 lbs. with the WD hitch), but the Expedition EL version was just a bit too long to fit into my garage, so I recently traded it for a 2019 Nissan Armada.  Still a pretty big beast but it's just the right overall length to fit into my garage with the Anderson hitch installed in the receiver.

Ollie Elite II - We always travel pretty light when towing, empty tanks, no generator or bike rack, no solar, only one awning, no other mods that have added any weight.   I haven't actually weighed it but probably around 5,500 lbs. loaded when traveling, 10% of that as tongue weight.

Armada curb weight of 5,900 lbs., (I too believe that the tow vehicle should weigh as much or more than the trailer being towed). 

Armada cargo Capacity 1,583 lbs.

Big honkin' 5.6 liter V-8 engine.  390 HP/394 lb-ft

Towing mode for the transmission.

8,500 lbs. towing/850 lbs. tongue weight capacity with a WD hitch, so it's plenty for the Ollie II, and the V-8 never feels like it's straining at all.  

Body on frame construction with galvanized steel body panels (so hopefully no rust in the long term).

Factory hitch receiver and wiring harness but I had to install a trailer brake controller (Tekonsha P3).

Gas mileage has been the downside.   The big V-8 is a gas guzzler.  About 16 average when not towing.  Haven't done a long trip yet with the Ollie but expecting around 11-13 when towing.

All the creature comforts in the Armada interior, plenty of interior storage, 360 degree cameras which are very handy for getting into campsites, and also auto-leveling suspension so it levels out nicely when the trailer is hooked up.  So far I'd give it an "A".  

I am surprised sometimes by people towing Ollie IIs with smaller SUVs.   They seem to do ok in standard flat land towing situations but may eventually run into issues on extreme uphill or downhill stretches if towing out west, and a heavily loaded hitch puts a lot of stress/strain on the sheet metal of a uni-body vehicle, to the point that some manufacturers say to NEVER use a weight distribution hitch on certain small uni-body SUVs.  I feel strongly that only vehicles with body on frame construction should be used for towing something as heavy as the Elite II.

Edited by FrankC

2019 Elite II - Hull #461

 

Tow Vehicle: 2019 Ford F-250 & 2019 Nissan Armada 

 

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I'm the new girl on the block... in fact, I've been fantasizing about this life style for years.  I'm just moving into the first purchases of a 5 year plan which may be condensed into 3 😉 if this crazy world continues ...

 The tow vehicle , after listening to everyone here, seems key.  I had thought about a Toyota Tundra but I don't hear much chatter including them in your posts.  I have hauled horses up and down the East coast, driving my employers vehicles, mostly Dodges and Fords.  They were always massive vehicles, 3500 and 350, not something I would like to take grocery shopping.  The Subaru Outback has to go and from I've read here, most SUV's are "on the bubble", to use your terms.  I'm still thinking Toyota unless someone gives me good reason not to...  The 4Runner as I'm reading through all this, doesn't seem to be enough at 5,000 but the Tundra at 8,500 - 10,200 seems fine.  Thoughts appreciated.

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On 12/18/2019 at 7:42 AM, Landrover said:

My 2017 Duramax  has those ranges 15mpg towing and 22 mpg non towing. No performance upgrades.

 

On 12/18/2019 at 6:03 AM, ahattar said:

22-24, really?  My brother has a 2017 and it gets 16mpg in the most perfect conditions.  What has changed to get 3/4 tons in the 20's?

33k miles, still get 15+ towing - depending on conditions, and unloaded up to 21, but usually around 17 in stop n go.  What changed - better engines and computer control - combustion is maximized, and so on.  If I run down the Interstate at 70 mph, unloaded I get 20 mpg all day long. Downhill more. uphill a little less, but it all works out.

 

RB

Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"

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Giddy - 

I'm sure that you are about to receive a bunch of differing opinions regarding your question.

I really do not believe that there is a "bad" 1/2 ton or 3/4 ton truck out there and unless you plan on towing in the flat lands most of the time one of these trucks is probably what you will need.  There is absolutely nothing wrong with the Tundra.  Yes, it is a bit "long in the tooth" regarding its engine and overall design, but, it is also very reliable.  There are features of the current crop of Ford's, Chevies and Dodges that appeal more to some than others.  In all cases the cost of these trucks can get rather high.

As has been said before on this Forum - take a drive in all of them and choose the one that you like best.

Bill

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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4 hours ago, Giddyup49 said:

They were always massive vehicles, 3500 and 350, not something I would like to take grocery shopping.

Most of the people on this forum have trucks, and we are part of the small minority who tow an Ollie with an SUV. For us, a truck would not fit into our small garage, and we felt it would not be a good vehicle for our everyday use, such as grocery shopping. 

We purchased an Audi Q7 SUV. It is the largest vehicle we have ever owned, but it drives wonderfully and has a large cargo area. The Q7 has a 7700 lb towing capacity, and it tows the Ollie like a dream. Plenty of power towing, whether going up hills or when accelerating to enter a freeway. 

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David Stillman, Salt Lake City, Utah

2016 Oliver Elite II  Hull 164    |    2017 Audi Q7 tow vehicle. 

Travel and Photography Blog: http://davidstravels.net

 

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Giddyup49, the Tundra is due for a refresh. Might be coming late this year.

I'm with the others who say there probably isn't a bad truck out there. Buy what feels like a great drive to you, after you've tried them all.

Are you planning on an Elite II, or the classic (smaller) Elite I? We've towed our Elite I with a Volvo xc90, a Silverado 1500, and the current 2008 Ram 1500.

 

Sherry

2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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I just purchased a 2020 Tundra and will be picking up my new Ollie in late July.  (I Hope).   I looked at GMC and Ford.  I liked the looks of the Dodge but a 2012 Jeep Rubicon that was the most undependable car I have ever bought prevented me from ever looking at another Dodge.  A current friend has a new Dodge and the dealer is trying to fix a  truck that has already met Lemon Law requirements.   What sold be on my Tundra is that I have a 2011 Lexus 570 that has 215K and has been unbelievably trouble free.  The engine is shared by the Tundra.  It does lack some of the latest bells and whistles that GMC & Ford offer, but the motor just runs and runs.  My cars always seem to have over 200K miles on them before I get something new, so I am accustomed to not having all the latest and greatess.   Dependability was my most important factor which is why I guess the reason I am buying an Oliver.     So here is my Tundra plug!  I would have liked to seen what the 2021 Tundra was like but when my F150 with 267K transmission when out and my wife said "why don't you just go buy a new truck"..... you have to strike why the iron is hot.

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Erv & Sherry  Hull # 650

2020 Tundra SR5 Crewcab 4X4

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Posted (edited)

Just a friendly reminder - my intent when starting this thread was not to just generally discuss trucks, their features, their reliability, but to grade how your tow vehicle actually pulls your Ollie, preferably under stressful conditions . Cruising flat terrain near sea level is not a real test. How it functions at 100 degrees, 8000 ft and a 30 mph headwind is most meaningful. Or climbing an 18% grade back road with 10 mph switchbacks...

Basically, how does your truck perform when the chips are down?

Thanks.

John Davies

Spokane WA

Edited by John E Davies
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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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I've had a number of people ask me about my Raptor over the past year.  Here's what I wrote in a recent PM, which I think is a fair assessment:

Quote

As far as power goes, it's no problem.  I'm sure that a big diesel would be better, but by how much, I couldn't say, since I've never towed with one.  I can only say that I've never thought that the truck lacked any oomf.

Fuel mileage is miserable, as would be expected.  I think I get 9 to 12 towing, depending on speed, grade, wind, whether the trailer is loaded with water, etc.  So you'll take a big hit in range, which bothers me more than the $.

Stability is the big question.  Personally, I think the Raptor is a bit squirrelly on it's own at highway speeds, so adding a trailer only makes it worse.  But take that opinion with a grain of salt - I'd say the same about most American cars in general.  And this is my first truck, so quite a change for me from a BMW.  Since I've never towed with a ¾ ton, I can't compare the two, but surely a super duty would feel considerably more stable.  All I can really say is that while I've never felt unsafe with the Raptor, it's not something I would recommend to anyone who doesn't have some other reason for needing/wanting the truck.  

Higher tire pressures help - I run 40/42 towing vs 37/35 when not.  I'm curious what the Icon springs would do on their own.  I'm thinking that I might try them with their extra load spring installed first, just to see how the truck feels and if they can handle the trailer on their own that way.

 

Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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2018 F-150 Platinum - short bed - 3.5 Ecoboost - Max Tow package - FX4 Offroad package - Leer cap.

Flat road towing gets around 14 mpg, unhitched getting about 19.

We swapped out the stock tires for burly E-rated tires, this made a huge difference in the ride (for the better). 45psi front, 50 back, Olly at 55psi.

1411 lbs official payload is 'just' enough to cover our needs, no extra capacity.

CAT scales show 3280 lbs front, 4100 rear, 5740 trailer, 13120 gross weight (trailer with full water, empty gray and black).
(This puts us over the 7000 gvw for the truck by 380 lbs... we've since trimmed that down, but still not under)

When hitched up, the rear end squats down, but the Anderson helps and certainly makes the whole thing feel MUCH more solid and connected.

The Olly tows beautifully. No trace of sway. Never feels like the truck is straining.

We've gone up and down some steep grades (over the Tetons, across Death Valley). Always had plenty of power, automatic engine braking helps with descending.

Have driven is some very adverse conditions - high winds, snow and ice, high altitude. No problem.

Got into some deep moon-dust while towing on a mining road and the 4 wheel drive had no trouble getting us through.

Regular mirrors work well, no need for the extended towing mirrors. Trailer blind-spot monitoring works and has helped.

Lane-keeping assist works well (though it becomes a nag on straight roads since the truck tracks very well and needs little input from the driver).

Never thought auto high-beams and rain-sensing wipers would be useful, but they sure have been.

So, final grade would be a "Meets or Exceeds" expectations.

If I had it to do over again, I would choose a trim level that had fewer features (heck, we never even open that huge moon roof) in an effort to get back some payload.

I've certainly considered moving up to the f-250 for the extra payload buffer (or perhaps the GMC 2500)... but, I don't think it's necessary.

2018-f150-platinum.jpg

Edited by thirddoor
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2019 Legacy Elite II #488 - Delivery July 24, 2019
2018 F150 Platinum SC SB EB - Leer canopy

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6 hours ago, John E Davies said:

Just a friendly reminder - my intent when starting this thread was not to just generally discuss trucks, their features, their reliability, but to grade how your tow vehicle actually pulls your Ollie, preferably under stressful conditions . Cruising flat terrain near sea level is not a real test. How it functions at 100 degrees, 8000 ft and a 30 mph headwind is most meaningful. Or climbing an 18% grade back road with 10 mph switchbacks...

Basically, how does your truck perform when the chips are down?

Thanks.

John Davies

Spokane WA

2017 Chevy high country 2500 hd duramax  Allison transmission. ( perfect ) grade A

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For those that like SUVs, here's my review of the 2018 Navigator L (fancy Expedition MAX):

I got fairly good gas mileage, 10-16 MPG depending on conditions.  Towing with the Andersen was awesome, without the Andersen it felt more bouncy.  Upside: 222" long - 18.5'  fit in our garage great.  For comparison the F150 (that it is based on) is 232" long (5.5' box) or 244" long (6.5 box super crew).  I could press a few buttons, the seats fold automatically, and I can fit a 4x8 sheet of plywood in.  Press buttons again and the rear seats fold up and I can take 8 people to town.  The Navigator/Expedition are built on the F150 Frame but with independent rear suspension.  The navigator adds some electronic damping.  Probably the best riding vehicle I have been in.  Seats were very comfortable (including a decent massage function that was good at preventing hot spots).  Power: Navigator has the 450 HP version of the 3.5 Ecoboost.  Power was never a problem.  Generally the 27 gallon tank of the L/MAX (shorter version is 23 gallons) gets us to lunch and then our final camp ground.  I like turbo engines because they are quieter than a naturally aspirated engine.  I flew over passes without fatigue.  It also had a 1500lbs payload, which beat the similarly equipped half tons I saw, plus it already came with a cap which would cost about 200lbs of payload there.

Where it got scary: in South Dakota we had blizzard conditions with 40 mph quartering head winds.  I had the "all season" Kumho tires that it comes stock with (my Blizzaks were on the other side of the South Dakota waiting for mounting for the Rockies and Cascades).  The HD trucks were blowing by us, but not sure if that was the "sport all season tires" or the truck.  There were also about a half dozen flipped over semis - to give in idea of how extreme conditions were.   Basically it was the wrong time to be on the road, so once we found a place to overnight we stopped. Once we got the blizzaks, everything was great.

Tech: adaptive cruise was great, heads up display nice to have.  360 camera was "OK", it was hard to really see how close things were.  The newer GM cameras blow this out of the water.  The blind spot monitor with trailer coverage was nice, it caught at least one person I didn't initially see that was driving in the dark/rain with no headlights on🤪.  The pro-trailer assist was pretty garbage, it would lose the trailer, so we just used an intercom system between the wife and I and back up the trailer the old fashioned way.

Why'd I sell?  I had a very rare set of options (tech package, tow package, cargo package, and 8 person seating vs a console or captains chairs).  Someone had to have it so they offered more than I bought it for.

Other downside: Sticker on mine was something like $93k (I bought used for less).  I can get a nicely outfitted HD diesel truck and a Tesla Model 3 for the same price.

SUV vs Truck: This was my first SUV as I've had only trucks before.  The small size was great in NYC, DC, etc...  The downside is that I was much more willing to put stuff in the bed of my truck than my $93k SUV.  While I could fit sheetrock, was that what I wanted to put it in?  I could have used a utility trailer I guess.  I never felt comfortable with propane or gasoline in the back of the SUV (drive with windows down), but throwing a generator and a gas can in the back of the truck is no problem.  I

Why I didn't get Toyota? The Tundra is an old platform, carries less, burns more gas, and 

 

Grade A- as long as you are fine with the price and find one with the tow package. I think the 2021 Suburban with the 3.0 Duramax and air suspension could be a pretty potent tow vehicle when it comes out and will probably eclipse the Navigator until it gets the 2021 F150 refresh parts.

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2019 LE2 #529.   Standard Floorplan.

2020 GMC Sierra 2500 Duramax

 

 

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Heard of all these HD trucks towing can anyone tell me what they think of towing an Ollie I or II with a 2019 Gmc Denali Canyon 2d 4 cylinder duromax  max towing is 7700 lbs

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Posted (edited)

Dennis, you might want to start a new thread with this question. Or, i could split it off for you.

Last year, I  test drove a Canyon Denali, though not the diesel. I was disappointed in the availability of safety/tech features. The truck rode great in my test drive. Seats, visibility, stereo, all good. Just seemed defeatured for a 2019 vehicle, from a tech and safety angle. I'm hoping gm ups the game for 2020. It has the potential to be a great daily driver, and possibly a good tow for an Ollie 1 like mine. 

I put a deposit on a Cybertruck. 

Edited by SeaDawg
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2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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I pull an E2 with a 2016 tundra and have done so comfortably for about 10,000 mi. I have pulled multiple trips to the CO mountains without issue. I carry a generator, fuel cans, a loaded cooler, and tools in the truck bed. I fill up my water tank and don’t use an Anderson hitch. I occasionally do 70-75mph on the interstate and so far have never experienced trailer sway on this rig. 

The current incentives are causing me to toy with the idea of getting a new truck. Even though Fords and Chevys have a few more whistles and bells, At this point I will probably replace my tundra with a newer one  just because of how well the truck pulls the trailer.

 

 

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4 hours ago, carnivore said:

I pull an E2 with a 2016 tundra and have done so comfortably for about 10,000 mi. I have pulled multiple trips to the CO mountains without issue. I carry a generator, fuel cans, a loaded cooler, and tools in the truck bed. I fill up my water tank and don’t use an Anderson hitch. I occasionally do 70-75mph on the interstate and so far have never experienced trailer sway on this rig. 

The current incentives are causing me to toy with the idea of getting a new truck. Even though Fords and Chevys have a few more whistles and bells, At this point I will probably replace my tundra with a newer one  just because of how well the truck pulls the trailer.

 

 

That is great to hear.  We also have a Tundra and will pick up our E2 some time in June.  I'm buying an Anderson from another Oliver owner who no longer needs it and will probably convert it to the larger ball.

As to a new Tundra, I'm waiting to see what late 2021 brings with the next generation. Twin turbo V6 I hear, although I really like the Lexus designed 5.7 V8 we have now.

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We have a 2019 F-150 Lariat, 3.5 EcoBoost, FX4, Max Trailer Package, Anderson WDH.  Have about 17,000 trailer miles mostly out west in the Mountains where we para-glide.   My truck performance stat's mirror McMac's above so no need to repeat them.

I must haul Ollie up steep grades, but not even close to John D's 18%.  Generally mine are remote not paved, and 13% grade is what I see as a max grade on the truck computer.  With a 6,000 Oliver EII, it is no problem going slow using the "Crawl" mode and 4wd.  I have one section of 12 - 13% grade that I do 3 times a summer and I have no issues with this rocky, sometimes slick mountain road.

However, last summer I had to come down this road after rain, lots of rain.  I knew it was going to be a sloppy run and set up the F-150 using all the tools it had.  Low range and locked the transmission into 2nd gear, locked the rear axle, 4X4, and set the crawl mode to about 6 MPH.  At several really slick sections I manually lightly worked the trailer brakes to keep the speed to the set point and also to keep Ollie behind the truck and going the same direction.  All the engineering worked better than expected.  

If I were to find myself in the same situation again, I would have:

  • Waited a day if I could have.
  • Dumped fresh and gray water tanks
  • Loaded more stuff from Ollie into the truck and especially its bed
  • Reduced air pressure in all tires by 10 to 12 PSI

My grades are:

  • For cross country running       A+
  • For mountain paved roads      A
  • For sometimes graded mountain fire roads    B+

If I were looking to purchase a new TV,  I would get the same rig again.

Geronimo John

 

 

 

2019 Ollie and The Beast.jpg

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Tug:  2019 F-150 SuperCrew Lariat, 3.5L EcoBoost, Max Trailer Tow, FX-4, 4X4, Rear Locker

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Posted (edited)

GJ - 

Apparently you are not the only one that feels this way about the F150.  It hasn't been #1 for 40 years without some reason or the other.

I had never owned a Ford product prior to my first F150 in 2011 (and then my second in 2017).  Actually I was a Toyota fan after a great experience with a Tacoma.  But, finding that the Tundra interior was not to my liking and the dated mechanics I went looking at Dodges.  While I understand that the current year's interiors are very nice, in 2017 I was not impressed and reviews of their transmissions were not glowing.  I also briefly considered GM (1/2 ton) products and really liked the exterior but I remembered that when I see a truck coming toward me, for the past ten years or so, with one front light out it will be a GM product 9 times out of 10.  If they can't fix that then what is the point?

Anyway, as I've said many times before on this Forum - there really isn't a "bad" 1/2 ton truck on the market these days and I'm sure virtually any one of them will do the job (equipped properly of course) but I'm still very happy with my purchase of the F150, 3.5 ecoboost, FX4 with tow package.  I have never had a hint of an issue on the flats, in the mountains, paved or unpaved roads.  Certainly I agree with your (GJ's) grading.

Bill

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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We have a 2008 Tundra double cab 4wd with 5.7 litre.  It has the factory tow package.  We towed approximately 5000 miles since picking up our Elite II last October.  Our travels have been from Tennessee to Maine and Maine to Florida and back.  I added a plug in electronic brake and use the Andersen hitch.   The truck is rated for 10500 lbs towing capacity with a payload of 1500 lbs.  The 5.7 puts out 380 HP and 401 lbs of torque.  Gas mileage is around 13 mpg around town and about 14-15 on the highway when we are not towing.  On our trips towing we average overall about 11mpg.  Mileage drops in hilly situations.  On flat or during normal acceleration you hardly notice the trailer.  I am able to tow at 1500 to 2000 rpm most of the time up to 65 mph.  The trailer tracks well and I notice very little sway in higher winds.  I am confident that the Tundra can handle any up hill grades.  The truck has plenty of power.  There are 2 areas I would like improvement, the gas tank is small at 26 gallons so I am looking for fuel at 180-200 miles.  I also feel the brakes could be better.

  I contemplated getting a new HD diesel but thought I would see how well the Tundra would work for us before making that expenditure.  The Tundra worked very well.   

I still would like like a new HD diesel for perhaps increased fuel efficiency, additional paylod, bigger brakes,exhaust brake, and no requirement for the Andersen hitch.  

The Tundra ride is comfortable to me.  I give the Tundra B+ grade.

As much as I want a new HD truck (and I do want one) with the newer gadgets, I have a hard time justifying the additional funds to replace a truck that I like, is comfortable to me, meets our needs, that has only needed regular maintenance, tires and brakes in the 12 years we have owned it.  

I think despite the fact that the Tundra is due for a major overhaul I think it is a very good half ton truck.  Also in our area they are very much desired in the used market and bring good $ for a good truck.  For what it is worth, the 2008 Tundra was the Truck of the year in 2008.

If I didn't already have the Tundra when we purchased the Oliver, and needed to purchase a tow vehicle it probably would be an HD diesel,  I did test drive all 3 brands of HD trucks. They were all good.  I liked the Ford the most.  For now it will remain the Tundra for us.

Stay healthy and safe.  

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Posted (edited)

So we tow with a 2018 Silverado 1500 tow package 5.3 L with active fuel management crew cab short box.  The truck is more then enough to tow the Oliver.  In very steep inclines i can still pass semi trucks with no problem at highway speeds so power is not a huge issue.  Now when it comes to stability I tow with no weight distribution nor any sway control.   Most pickup now a days have yaw control and sway control built in and with apply the brakes accordingly.   Towing fuel mileage is to be expected at around 12mpg.  Now disconnected I average 20.4 and have gotten 23.9 over a 400 mile range.  Have had no issues what so ever with heat or any other conditions for that matter.   Now with this being said this is my experience.  I have a CDL and have driven and towed with all sizes of trucks from compact trucks to class 8 semi trucks.   I am comfortable with the GM 1500.  Full disclosure I was a GM master certified tech for 20 years so take it for what it is worth.  My advice to anyone do research on the vehicle that you feel comfortable driving and make sure the specs meet the the work load it is going to be doing but your comfortable with.  My humble opinion and experience. So for me the grade is A plus.

Edited by jrle546
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Posted (edited)
On 4/24/2020 at 10:31 PM, Dennis1 said:

youre right on safety stuff but I got a great deal and love it. Without a trailer get 30 mpg at 70, will it tow a Ollie II ok

We own both a Silverado High Country 2500 HD diesel and a GMC Canyon SLT diesel. We love both. The Canyon is generally our daily driver (one tank of fuel since February.) We get about 35 MPG on the highway regardless of speed.  The Silverado is our tow vehicle. We get about 14 MPG towing our 7500 pound LEII and over 20 MPG on the highway.  Would the Canyon tow the Oliver?  Not very well, the trailer's too heavy.  Would it tow an Oliver Elite? Absolutely.  It would make one of the best tow vehicles out there.  I rate our Silverado as A+++.

Edited by ScubaRx
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Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

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