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Geocaching? Does anyone still do this,


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Paul and I have been sorting through boxes and closets. We came across this really cool geocache tag from Mountainborn, circa 2008 or 2009.

I stuck it on my Keychain,  as a great reminder of the fun and fellowship we had,  with the tiny group of owners, back in the day.

Just wondering? Is this stiil a travel sport? I have no idea.

 

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What a great idea. Each owner could get a bunch of coins made. Meet another owner and we could swap a coin. The idea would be to collect all 672 (or 762) coins. Maybe mount them on a map? Where found?

Wonder where that coin was made?

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I don't know wher the coin was made, but it's really nice. A little bigger than a nickel, smaller than a quarter.

It's over a decade ago, but I  can ask Larry if he remembers.  

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Heck - I can hardly remember yesterday - good luck with Larry 😁.

Yes geocasheing does still exist - remember the one million dollar chest that was found this year.  That could be considered a form of it.  Here in the Blue Ridge Mountains there are geocashes all over the place and people out hunting.

Bill

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I sent Larry a message, anyway. We'll see. Even if he remembers,  it's 50/50 the company is still doing the coins. It's awhile ago...

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OUR GEOCACHING TALE

In the 70's (before geocaching?) our local radio station had a "treasure hunt" contest sponsored by Pepsi-Cola.  The call sign, KWRO, was displayed atop the station's building in huge block letters.  Each summer we looked forward to the "Hunt for the Missing W".  The W was taken down from the roof, placed in a box, and buried somewhere in the county (Coos, Oregon).  Throughout the day, clues would be read over the air, a new clue each day, a ploy to get people to tune in to radio advertising. The clues were repeated from day to day, each clue having a unique number (like an Ollie!).  There were a few parameters - the W is on public property, no fences or barriers are in the way, etc.  The lucky person finding the W had to return the the treasure to the radio station to claim the $500 prize; you might recall, that was a fair amount of money in the 70's.

Each Summer, we participated in the hunt. This was a great activity, getting families outdoors and interacting with each other.  When our boys were old enough, they enjoyed deciphering the clues, looking forward to the weekend when we would search for the W.  I wish I had documented the creative clues as well as our discussions as each of us, with our diverse analysis techniques, honed in on the location.  One year, I'm certain we found where the W had been initially hidden, along an abandoned road.  It appeared that the county road crew might have dug up the box with a grader blade while cleaning debris from the shoulder.  It was subsequently found later, in the same vicinity, by friends of ours - less than 5 miles from our rural community.  As Coos County is a predominantly rural county with vast areas of wooded USFS and BLM land, it helped that my husband was raised there and familiar with all the remote areas. 

And so, the hunts continued.  I suspect the W was damaged by the previous incident because, thereafter, it was not the "hunt for the missing W"  but the "Search for the Missing Pepsi Can".   The treasure became an empty Pepsi can containing a note instructing the lucky finder to return it to the radio station to claim the $500 prize.   Not quite as mysterious as the "Missing W". 

Finally, sometime in the 80's, our endeavors paid off.  While walking along a BLM road in a logged over area in search of the elusive can, we spotted it, partially hidden in a large stump several yards off the side of the road.  It was obvious that someone had walked through the brush to the stump; I presume an employee from the radio station routinely checked to see if the can was still there.  I don't remember who spotted it first.  I only know that, as a four-boy, one-income family, the $500 was well received.  It paid for a good part of a much needed new roof on our home.

 

Edited by Susan Huff
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