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My wife is hesitant to buy, due to cost


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17 hours ago, Mike and Carol said:

Used Olivers sell for way more than 50% of their original cost.  90% would be a better estimate.  Mike

Do you know how that resale value compares to stick built trailers such as the R-Pod?   I assume Oliver trailers are much higher. 

John and Debbie, Beaverton, Oregon,  2017 Ford Expedition EL 4x4 with heavy duty tow package. 

Present trailer, 2003 Coleman tent trailer

Oliver Elite II is on my wish list

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4 minutes ago, John Welte said:

I have looked under the trailers and inside cabinets now.   We spent about an hour inside an Oliver.   Quality was obvious.   Thanks. 

Amazing the difference. 

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17 hours ago, Nancy K. said:

When we wanted to buy a used Ollie, they were selling for almost full price within a few days of being listed.  So we decided that we would buy a new one, enjoy getting to choose all our options, and if trailer camping didn't turn out to be for us we were confident that we would recoup almost all of our investment.  We have had our Ollie for 9 months and are truly enjoying it.  

NancyK,  that was our argument for buying a new Subaru too.   A two year old Subaru was close in price to a new one.   

John and Debbie, Beaverton, Oregon,  2017 Ford Expedition EL 4x4 with heavy duty tow package. 

Present trailer, 2003 Coleman tent trailer

Oliver Elite II is on my wish list

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20 hours ago, Mainiac said:

Take a factory tour.

Then go to a local rv dealer and look inside the compartments of new units. My desk stapler has heavier staples than used to hold trim on. I saw 3/4" X 1" pine as wall studs ( and a knot had already fallen out as it twisted). Look at what the tires really are. Look at the underside and see if there is a thin frame prone to rusting out. While under there look to see if floor is particle board.

Then go look at Oliver. Arrange a local visit..

Mainiac,  that's the truth!   I have not been impressed with the quality of what I have seen so far. 

John and Debbie, Beaverton, Oregon,  2017 Ford Expedition EL 4x4 with heavy duty tow package. 

Present trailer, 2003 Coleman tent trailer

Oliver Elite II is on my wish list

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17 hours ago, Mike and Carol said:

Used Olivers sell for way more than 50% of their original cost.  90% would be a better estimate.  Mike

That's impressive 

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John and Debbie, Beaverton, Oregon,  2017 Ford Expedition EL 4x4 with heavy duty tow package. 

Present trailer, 2003 Coleman tent trailer

Oliver Elite II is on my wish list

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39 minutes ago, John Welte said:

Do you know how that resale value compares to stick built trailers such as the R-Pod?   I assume Oliver trailers are much higher. 

Values are hard to judge right now. As you said above used cars are selling for almost new values right now. Used put away wet units are commanding top values as well. Used stick built RV’s less than 3 years old are selling for new prices. Used Oliver’s are selling for 10-15k less than current prices. 
 

If Oliver keeps raising prices like they have over the past 5 years a unit equipped like you want will cost 100k (~25% increase in 5 years). I could easily see how you could sell a used unit in the future for a profit.  What will a $30k stick built be worth during that same timeframe?  IMO it depends on inflation and what new units are selling for.  

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Adding to other comments:

The current market for RVs has prompted manufacturers to increase production in order to meet demand, Oliver not withstanding.  Conventional mass produced stick built RVs are being pushed out to dealers at historical rates.  Added to the already shoddy construction, little to no quality control/customer service, and inflated prices, this is disaster waiting to happen. 

Oliver, on the other hand, went into the pandemic with outstanding customer service and quality.  To meet demand, yet maintain service/quality and their reputation for being trailers "built to last a lifetime", they have adapted to the market with production adjustments.  They now offer fewer options and have phased out personal customizations, placing priority on maintaining quality standards and customer service. 

When you purchase an Oliver Trailer, you are buying directly from the "Oliver Family" whose goal has always been to build a better RV and stand behind their product.   Most other brands are owned by an RV conglomerate, then pushed out to dealerships across the country.  With Oliver you deal only with the front end people; others, with a dealer that, now more than ever, doesn't care about you after the sale.  Oliver has certainly faced some challenges during this crazy RV market, but they are giving their best to not compromise the Oliver reputation.

Think about this: Brand X is priced at $35,000.  Deduct from this the overhead of a complex chain of production, including sales commissions.  How much of those $$$$ do you think are actually going into materials and labor?  Additionally, in a less volatile market, those prices were often discounted to promote sales and support the bottom line.  Comparatively, Oliver's overhead is not inflated by a complex business model.  You will get what you pay for with an Oliver; others brands, I'd guess you won't.

Lastly - In a few years, after the pandemic surge in RV subsides, we all know there is going to be a glut in the used RV market.  Aside from depressed values driven by high supply/low demand, poorly built trailers will be worth a small fraction of what they sold for.  As in the past, used Olivers should hold their value.  Though more Olivers have been sold than ever before, the supply will be nothing compared to that of other brands and when the market returns to normal, there will still be a demand for high quality trailers.

Of course Oliver trailers do have downsides: 

1. The wait.  In an instant gratification world, most buyers want an RV and they want it now.  Add to this pressure from dealer salespersons.  Don't let this influence your decision.  If you have long term RV goals, and finances are not restrictive, endure the wait.  You know the adage - "Good things come to those who wait". 

2. Limited floor plans.  The Elite is definitely a two-person trailer; Elite II can comfortably accommodate three.  Families do make them work, but for the most part Oliver trailers are not designed with families in mind.

In my opinion, between R-Pod and Oliver, the best choice is hands-down Oliver.  We took possession of our Elite II, hull #699, on December 7, 2020; thus the name "Pearl".  I am still in awe of the amazing quality.  Storage is more than adequate and well organized.  Every element is designed for function and easy maintenance.  Most importantly, despite the increase in production (they are now scheduling builds of hulls #1000+), Oliver has provided excellent customer support.  And, as an added bonus, you gain the knowledge and support of the Oliver Forum and its amazing members.

Wishing you the best.

Susan

 

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Ray and Susan Huff

Elite II Twin "Pearl" - Hull#699; delivered December 7, 2020

2013 F350 6.7l diesel Super Duty 4x4 long bed crew cab

1UP-USA Heavy-duty bike rack

2017 Leisure Travel Van Unity Twin Bed (sold)

AZARCAIDNVNMOKORTNTXUTWAsm.jpg

 

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My father died young, he was only 47. I was 20. He taught me many things that I was not smart enough to appreciate at that age, but something he once said to me has stuck with me these past 50+ years. I was contemplating buy a new tool. The one I wanted was a name brand and was quite expensive. I found another brand that was not nearly as well respected but was considerably less expensive. I weighed the pros and cons of each. Finally, I asked his opinion, should I buy the better brand or should I save money and buy the cheaper tool. He looked me straight in the eye and said, "Nobody was ever sorry they bought the best there is."

There have been times through the years that I have ignored this advice and bought some item that was cheaper or lacked all the features I wanted in an attempt to 'get by.' In almost all cases, I've ended up later buying the one I really wanted and ended up with two of the same thing, thereby having spent more money than I would have if I'd just gone ahead and bought the better one in the first place. I just don't buy things that I consider to be disposable.

I still have and use that tool that I bought on dad's advice. Can you really afford to buy cheaper items that you will just end up having to replace?

"...Nobody was ever sorry they bought the best there is..."  James Holly Landrum 10/1923 - 05/1971

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Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge)

2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, Hull #026 | 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, Hull #050 | 2022 Silverado High Country 3500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

             801469912_StatesVisitedTaliandSteve08-23-2021-I.jpg.26814499292ab76ee55b889b69ad3ef0.jpg1226003278_StatesVisitedTaliandSteve08-23-2021-H.jpg.dc46129cb4967a7fd2531b16699e9e45.jpg

 

 

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You can certainly make a financial argument for buying an Ollie over another trailer but in all honesty I think you’ll just be rationalizing a decision that you’ve already made for some other, probably more important, reason.

Buy it because you like it. Because you want something you can be proud of. Something that will be nice enough that you’ll actually want to get out there and use it.  And something that is dependable enough and well enough designed that you don’t spend your trip thinking about it rather than all the cool things it’s allowing you to experience. 

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❄️

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3 hours ago, Ray and Susan Huff said:

Adding to other comments:

The current market for RVs has prompted manufacturers to increase production in order to meet demand, Oliver not withstanding.  Conventional mass produced stick built RVs are being pushed out to dealers at historical rates.  Added to the already shoddy construction, little to no quality control/customer service, and inflated prices, this is disaster waiting to happen. 

Oliver, on the other hand, went into the pandemic with outstanding customer service and quality.  To meet demand, yet maintain service/quality and their reputation for being trailers "built to last a lifetime", they have adapted to the market with production adjustments.  They now offer fewer options and have phased out personal customizations, placing priority on maintaining quality standards and customer service. 

When you purchase an Oliver Trailer, you are buying directly from the "Oliver Family" whose goal has always been to build a better RV and stand behind their product.   Most other brands are owned by an RV conglomerate, then pushed out to dealerships across the country.  With Oliver you deal only with the front end people; others, with a dealer that, now more than ever, doesn't care about you after the sale.  Oliver has certainly faced some challenges during this crazy RV market, but they are giving their best to not compromise the Oliver reputation.

Think about this: Brand X is priced at $35,000.  Deduct from this the overhead of a complex chain of production, including sales commissions.  How much of those $$$$ do you think are actually going into materials and labor?  Additionally, in a less volatile market, those prices were often discounted to promote sales and support the bottom line.  Comparatively, Oliver's overhead is not inflated by a complex business model.  You will get what you pay for with an Oliver; others brands, I'd guess you won't.

Lastly - In a few years, after the pandemic surge in RV subsides, we all know there is going to be a glut in the used RV market.  Aside from depressed values driven by high supply/low demand, poorly built trailers will be worth a small fraction of what they sold for.  As in the past, used Olivers should hold their value.  Though more Olivers have been sold than ever before, the supply will be nothing compared to that of other brands and when the market returns to normal, there will still be a demand for high quality trailers.

Of course Oliver trailers do have downsides: 

1. The wait.  In an instant gratification world, most buyers want an RV and they want it now.  Add to this pressure from dealer salespersons.  Don't let this influence your decision.  If you have long term RV goals, and finances are not restrictive, endure the wait.  You know the adage - "Good things come to those who wait". 

2. Limited floor plans.  The Elite is definitely a two-person trailer; Elite II can comfortably accommodate three.  Families do make them work, but for the most part Oliver trailers are not designed with families in mind.

In my opinion, between R-Pod and Oliver, the best choice is hands-down Oliver.  We took possession of our Elite II, hull #699, on December 7, 2020; thus the name "Pearl".  I am still in awe of the amazing quality.  Storage is more than adequate and well organized.  Every element is designed for function and easy maintenance.  Most importantly, despite the increase in production (they are now scheduling builds of hulls #1000+), Oliver has provided excellent customer support.  And, as an added bonus, you gain the knowledge and support of the Oliver Forum and its amazing members.

Wishing you the best.

Susan

 

Thanks Susan for the well written response.   You make very valid reasons for going with Oliver.   Another member here pointed out the limitations of my present tv,  that being a 2017 Ford Expedition EL with tow package.   I learned a lot about GVWR,  CCC,  GCVWR and more.   I thought my Expedition would be adequate for the job,  but now I am not so sure.   We live in Oregon.   In a flat state like Florida,  it might not be a concern.   Of course,  the plan is to travel all over the country,  and that would include mountains.  

John and Debbie, Beaverton, Oregon,  2017 Ford Expedition EL 4x4 with heavy duty tow package. 

Present trailer, 2003 Coleman tent trailer

Oliver Elite II is on my wish list

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5 hours ago, John Welte said:

Do you know how that resale value compares to stick built trailers such as the R-Pod?   I assume Oliver trailers are much higher. 

I don’t know the resale potential of an R-Pod.  I’m sure it is not anywhere near that of an Oliver.  Olivers have had consistently high resale values.  Mike

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Texas Hill Country | Elite II #135 | Ram 2500 6.7L

ALAZARCACOFLGAIDILKSKYLAMDMSMOMTNENVNMNYNCNDOHOKSCSDTNTXUTVAWVWYsm.jpgALAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMAMS

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3 hours ago, John Welte said:

Thanks Susan for the well written response.   You make very valid reasons for going with Oliver.   Another member here pointed out the limitations of my present tv,  that being a 2017 Ford Expedition EL with tow package.   I learned a lot about GVWR,  CCC,  GCVWR and more.   I thought my Expedition would be adequate for the job,  but now I am not so sure.   We live in Oregon.   In a flat state like Florida,  it might not be a concern.   Of course,  the plan is to travel all over the country,  and that would include mountains.  

I assume you are thinking an Elite II is your choice.  However, I wouldn't overlook the smaller Elite.  I would ask Oliver to arrange a showing of whichever one you haven't seen, so you have a comparison of the two.  If you are over 6' tall, the Elite might not work as well.

That being said, years ago my dad towed a smaller Komfort Lite with an Expedition - V8 engine with tow package.  I can't tell you how much the trailer weighed, but he had no problem towing it over passes between California and Oregon.  I think there are several here who tow Olivers with an SUV.

Where are you located in Oregon?  We live near the SW coast. 

  • Thanks 1

Ray and Susan Huff

Elite II Twin "Pearl" - Hull#699; delivered December 7, 2020

2013 F350 6.7l diesel Super Duty 4x4 long bed crew cab

1UP-USA Heavy-duty bike rack

2017 Leisure Travel Van Unity Twin Bed (sold)

AZARCAIDNVNMOKORTNTXUTWAsm.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, Ray and Susan Huff said:

I assume you are thinking an Elite II is your choice.  However, I wouldn't overlook the smaller Elite.  I would ask Oliver to arrange a showing of whichever one you haven't seen, so you have a comparison of the two.  If you are over 6' tall, the Elite might not work as well.

That being said, years ago my dad towed a smaller Komfort Lite with an Expedition - V8 engine with tow package.  I can't tell you how much the trailer weighed, but he had no problem towing it over passes between California and Oregon.  I think there are several here who tow Olivers with an SUV.

Where are you located in Oregon?  We live near the SW coast. 

We live in Beaverton,  ten miles west of Portland.   It has a six cylinder,  twin turbo charge 3.5 L engine.   It's more powerful than our Suburban thatbhad 8 cylinders and was 5.7 L odd as that seems.   The Suburban was  1992 that we had for about 25 years. 

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John and Debbie, Beaverton, Oregon,  2017 Ford Expedition EL 4x4 with heavy duty tow package. 

Present trailer, 2003 Coleman tent trailer

Oliver Elite II is on my wish list

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