Jump to content

HOW TO: Drawers: remove and reinstall your galley and end table drawers, fix loose or stripped screws, and glue the bottoms for extra strength


Recommended Posts

These drawers are not at all intuitive when it comes to taking them out of the galley cabinet. It is dead easy if you pretend that you are a simpleton and don't over think things... . Stand over the end of the open drawer, reach under the sides at the very front with both hands. Put your fingers underneath on the inner edge of the orange release thingies and squeeze, move your fingers toward your palms. The latches will release and you can lift the drawer up and out, away from the slides, which will probably spring back out of sight. That is the "self closing" feature at work. Here is what is going on:

IMG_7383.thumb.jpeg.16d5b5527b25696814065f283dc07d3a.jpeg

IMG_7384.thumb.jpeg.425afef4d95df3fd257af97450eea918.jpeg

The drawer is held to the latch assembly by two TINY SHORT screws. They are known to strip out the soft wood. Sometimes you will find the drawer lying up by the bathroom door with spatulas and other stuff scattered everywhere. Tighten them gently, they will move! If they are stripped, install longer ones. FYI this is a six year old drawer, Oliver may have altered these parts. For example, mine don't have the inner safety latches. Note that you might want to wear disposable gloves.

EDIT: one member installed 1” long screws, driven into new holes at an angle, and found that to be a very solid way to do this.

IMG_7387.thumb.jpeg.05ed19384e0ab07143810323066aa35b.jpeg

Here is the end of the slide, showing the opening that catches the latch.

IMG_7388.thumb.jpeg.2e31d90ba36835aba859130c69ba1136.jpeg

THIS IS SO VERY COOL! I just discovered it after all these years.... On the bottom of each slide, about 5 inches in from the end, is a tiny pin that sticks down. When reinstalling the drawer, you can use it to pull the slide outwards until it clicks into the latch. It keeps your fingers away from the grease too.

IMG_7389.thumb.jpeg.818d86771f667f207fd324290c6da0f3.jpeg

Finally, you can flip each drawer and lay a thin bead of wood glue around the joint between the bottom and the sides and let it sit overnight. It will dry almost clear, so don't worry about minor mistakes. Plus nobody but you will ever know. I do not recommend gluing the inside of the drawers, that will show and it also has some sort of protective clear coat, so the glue might not stick.

IMG_7377.thumb.jpeg.64fa9e4287ab95c4a93ead74d44fd2c9.jpeg

 

This thread is very much related: ... https://olivertraveltrailers.com/forums/topic/2151-how-to-galley-drawer-travel-straps/

John Davies

Spokane WA

 

  • Thanks 2
  • Like 4

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is a pic from that other thread showing how the screws can pull out of the front part of the drawer.

92597545-4CB4-4CB0-A9C3-3A4A6342C250.thumb.jpeg.39f7771a087d4bbc177ba68f9734aaf5.jpeg
 

John Davies

Spokane WA 

  • Thanks 1
  • Like 1

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John,

Useful advice on dealing with the drawer releases.  However, I suggest NOT glueing the bottoms of the drawers to the sides.  The drawer bottoms typically rest in a groove in the drawer frame and are purposely NOT glued to permit movement of the wood as temperature and more importantly, humidity vary.

  • Thanks 1
  • Like 6

North Texas | 2022 LEII, Hull #990, delivered 2/17/22 | 2014 BMW X5 35d

spacer.png

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, dhaig said:

However, I suggest NOT glueing the bottoms of the drawers to the sides.  The drawer bottoms typically rest in a groove in the drawer frame and are purposely NOT glued to permit movement of the wood as temperature and more importantly, humidity vary.

That is an important consideration, definitely. In this case I am not concerned since the drawer sides and bottoms are both made from wood. If they were different materials, then definitely do not glue. I think this is one of those situations where you have to decide whether you want the bottom to bow down and perhaps fall out of a groove, or stay in place and possibly crack. If an owner is concerned, he can Google “floating drawer bottom”, do some reading in the woodworkers forums, and decide for himself. 

BTW, I live in, and generally camp in, an arid part of the country, so prolonged high humidly or dramatic moisture changes is rarely a worry. And a couple of my drawers are quite heavily loaded, they are not all filled with plastic utensils or lightweight personal items. 

Thanks very much for the comment.

John Davies

Spokane WA

 

  • Like 2

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

For reference,  we have a 2015 LE2 and our drawer release is the black "handle" shown in the drawer slide photo below20220618_125841.thumb.jpg.b15dcd0d83606243b828fb4ad9cf1c58.jpg.  Those handles had to be moved either up or down for the release to happen so the drawer could be pulled all the way out.  AND the black handle on each side moved in opposite direction of other side.  So if I pulled the left handle up then I pushed the right handle down. 

 

  • Like 2

Alberta & Randy

2015 LE II / 2018 F150 3.5L XLT EcoBoost

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/4/2022 at 9:02 PM, dhaig said:

John,

Useful advice on dealing with the drawer releases.  However, I suggest NOT glueing the bottoms of the drawers to the sides.  The drawer bottoms typically rest in a groove in the drawer frame and are purposely NOT glued to permit movement of the wood as temperature and more importantly, humidity vary.


Don,

Agree 💯on no glue suggestion.

Thanks!

David

0EED8E3B-D84E-4F0D-B52F-5E473FD3F2B4.jpeg.594e912d889377ce9a64a2f5c88ade83.jpeg

2020 OLEII - Hull #634   TV -2021 F 350 6.7 liter Diesel Lariat Ultimate “Tremor”

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the glue or no glue - I would expect the drawer bottom to be dimensionally stable since it's  a thin sheet of plywood, which has grain of the separate ply layers going in perpendicular directions. There is very little movement with changing humidity along the length of grain - it happens more so across/perpendicular to the grain - so plywood is kind of frozen in each dimension by the criss-crossing grain (it will have nonzero movement, but so small as to be generally not a consideration in typical joinery like this). Similarly, the front and sides of the drawer have their grain going parallel to the slots in which the drawer bottom fits. So I wouldn't expect those sides or the front to expand or contract significantly along the length of that slit. 

It's been a while since I built any drawers or otherwise joined ply into solid wood as is happening here, so I remain open to some solid explanation for why what John suggests would cause a problem, but based on what I recall my woodworking boss teaching me about designing joinery to handle wood movement (c. 1981-82), I think this should be OK. 

One reference I just found which has a decent explanation of wood movement with respect to grain direction

 

 edited to add: this is different from the case of a solid wood (ie not plywood) door panel that’s held by channels in the rails and stiles of the door, because the solid wood panel will expand and contract in the Direction that’s perpendicular to the wood grain and so needs room to expand into those grooves during high humidity (and enough width to not come out of the groove in low humidity) and if glued in place will tend to split after a few expansion/contraction cycles. Btw at the wood shop where I worked we often made tables with solid wood framed tops with plywood inserts that were well glued to the frames. Sometimes we covered the plywood with tile, sometimes with laminate (Formica or a cousin). This would be similar structurally to gluing the drawer bottoms to the front back and sides, at least from the perspective of response to changing humidity…

  • Like 4

Jim and  Yanna, Woodinville WA

2004 Ford E250 camper conversion

Oliver Elite II hull #709

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Mike D. said:

Would clear-coating the drawer bottoms with polyurethane help reduce moisture absorption? 

Not really, with respect to the effects of longer term humidity, at least that's my understanding from my woodworking days (where we used a lot of spray on polyurethane and still paid attention to things like attaching table tops to aprons in such a way as to allow for expansion/contraction of solid wood tops). But that's a bit academic IMO, because as I noted (and is described numerically at the link I shared) plywood does not expand/contract very much with changes in humidity. It would help a bit with any spills or leaks as long as you catch them reasonably quickly.

  • Like 3

Jim and  Yanna, Woodinville WA

2004 Ford E250 camper conversion

Oliver Elite II hull #709

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Jim_Oker said:

It would help a bit with any spills or leaks as long as you catch them reasonably quickly.

Yep, I get your point.   However I meant the underside of the drawers (the side you don’t see), just as an overkill  measure for those not in agreement with the glue.  

  • Like 1

“Ramble” - 2021 Legacy Elite II #797;  2020 Ford F-250

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

I have done  (0)  nothing to my drawers in 15  seasons.  Just saying. 

The format  is what it is.

  • Like 1

2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12

Florida and Western North Carolina, or wherever the truck goes....

400 watts solar. Dc compressor fridge. No inverter. 2 x 105 ah agm batteries .  Life is good.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Mike D. said:

However I meant the underside of the drawers (the side you don’t see),

One of the things I learned from my woodworking boss was to treat both sides of any panel the same way. If for some reason you wanted to finish the bottoms with polyurethane you should do both sides the same way. Otherwise you might get warping as humidity increases

i don’t think it would add much of any strength to the drawer assembly though with I think was John’s goal with the glue (I question how much that adds also but I don’t see a harm in it)

  • Like 1

Jim and  Yanna, Woodinville WA

2004 Ford E250 camper conversion

Oliver Elite II hull #709

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Jim_Oker said:

One of the things I learned from my woodworking boss was to treat both sides of any panel the same way.

In  John D. Original post he mentioned the upper sides of the drawer panels were already clear-coated,  hence my suggestion the bottom could be done likewise to seal & stabilize.  It was just a thought, I may do nothing to my drawers until it’s necessary. 

  • Like 1

“Ramble” - 2021 Legacy Elite II #797;  2020 Ford F-250

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/20/2022 at 5:52 AM, Mike D. said:

In  John D. Original post he mentioned the upper sides of the drawer panels were already clear-coated,  hence my suggestion the bottom could be done likewise to seal & stabilize.  It was just a thought, I may do nothing to my drawers until it’s necessary. 

The only part of my drawers that has any kind of coating is the upper sidet of the plywood bottom. If you want to take steps to preserve the wood, you should coat all the parts, including the insides of the cabinet itself. That way if you get an unexpected gusher from a failed sink connection, it will not soak in. Though a long slow drip is much more likely to cause rot and failure, because you might not notice it for many months or years.

John Davies

Spokane WA

  • Like 1

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...