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Any tips for leaf spring maintenance?


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This web page suggested using wire brush to clean leaf springs and applying degreasing fluid after. Does that sound right?

Inspected the leaf springs yesterday and notice 3 things.

  1. Only 1 rebound clip installed (circle in red below)
  2. The rubber gasket (circle in green) is also cracked bad.
  3. The nuts at the end of u-bolts are very rusty.

Should I be concerned?

Thank you!

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2021 Oliver Legacy Elite II - Hull #854
2021 Ford Expedition Platinum

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1 and 3 are normal. The green circle is your shock bushings. Ideally they should not look like that, but it is actually very common, even in a nearly new truck. I think over tightening the nuts may cause this. I would inspect them annually, if they start to lose chunks of rubber, then you should change all eight pairs. You should also look at your shocks to make sure they are not leaking oil  from the top of the lower cylinder (blown seal).

I have never heard of spring maintenance on a trailer. That website is talking about trucks IMHO. I have never done anything except lube the grease zerk fittings, and check the hardware for tightness. Springs can and do fail, I am not sure you would be able to see a crack before it actually broke. As far as cleaning goes, one half hour run down the highway in heavy rain will clean them pretty well…. they get pressure washed by the water shooting out from under your TV.

It would not hurt to spray a little penetrating oil on the rusty ubolts, right at the nuts, that will make it easier to check the torque and might help to prevent more rust in the future. It is unsightly but will remain purely cosmetic, unless you start towing in winter.

The amount of threads showing past each nut should be the same. I am not sure why one ubolt is uneven. You could try to adjust it, but I don’t think is is a big deal, as long as it is clamped down tightly.

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Here is my 2017 LE2 Hull 218, I just now took a pic:

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Please add your trailer and tow vehicle info to a signature, so it will appear after all your posts so we will know what you have. There have been a lot of changes over the years.

PS, my axles may look nicer than others this age because I have protective rubber flaps which keep the rocks and water from striking them directly. 

John Davies

Spokane WA

 

 

 

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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As John said, your #2 item/cracked rubber shock bushings unfortunately seem to be the (poor) industry standard on ALL vehicles to save pennies.  Here’s a photo of a shock bushing on my 2 year old Ford F-250, and my Oliver shock bushings look about the same.  Seems ridiculous when there are known good alternative material options like polyurethane for the bushings that the shock manufacturers could easily use that are only slightly more expensive.  When my Oliver shocks eventually do need replaced I’ll install PU bushings.   

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2019 Oliver Legacy Elite II - Hull #461

Tow Vehicle: 2019 Ford F-250 SuperCab 4x4, 6.2L Flex-Fuel engine  

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Regarding the cracked rubber shock bushings, those on our 2022 LEII show similar cracks.  I noticed their condition the first time I went under the trailer to look for the Zero grease fittings.   Our Hull 990 was delivered 2/17/22 and now has had approximately 3000 miles of use.  In such limited time and use, I would expect the bushings to be dirty, but not significantly cracked.

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North Texas | 2022 LEII, Hull #990, delivered 2/17/22 | 2014 BMW X5 35d

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56A99C1F-7765-4B5F-8B0A-A863EBD97F54.thumb.jpeg.5be9b208dfdef051d95307e690480703.jpeg

 

https://gabriel.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Gabriel-HD-Tech-Bulletin-Shock-Installation.pdf

I think somebody at Oliver is overdoing it…..BTW the shocks on my trailer are Monroe Gas Magnums. It is interesting, the Oliver warranty is just one year, but if you buy and install them yourself it is lifetime. Something to consider if you have one or more blown ones.

https://www.carid.com/monroe/gas-magnum-rv-driver-or-passenger-side-shock-absorber-mpn-555001.html

And if you do experience blown seals, it may be due to running way too much air in the tires. Two of mine blew in the first season (60 psi!). I replaced them and since then all have been fine at 42 psi. You are “supposed to” replace both on the same axle, but I suspect that recommendation is more for cars and trucks than for an RV.

John Davies

Spokane WA

  • Like 5

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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