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John E Davies

Towing in winter, chains, etc

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There seems to be some interest in this idea, so I thought it would be best to start a new thread here. In regards to cables on the trailer, it is _super_ risky to tow in those kinds of conditions, I would never willingly attempt it, never ever, with a heavy trailer. The chance of jack knifing your trailer goes way up, and that might total both vehicles and hurt you, or worse.

 

If I were stranded back on some forest road I would drive out solo and hire a wrecker to retrieve my Ollie.

 

But if you want to have some so you can try to get down off a snowy mountain or off an iced up road in a true unexpected emergency, I have always liked the Z cables that zig zag across the tread, so there is always one part of a cable contacting the road. For vehicles with ABS they are recommended over conventional styles since they do not constantly "break traction". They call them Z-Chains for no reason that I can understand, but they are lightweight cables and very easy to store.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Security-Chain-SZ335-Passenger-Traction/dp/B000BR8UAE

 

I don't know which size would be needed for an Ollie.

 

You should put on two sets and back way off on the brake setting to avoid lockup. They will certainly help with stopping but they will also provide lateral grip to keep the trailer from sliding sideways in turns and on off-camber roads, and into the ditch or snow berm.

 

In winter I always carry two pairs of heavy duty truck chains in my tow vehicle. I have rarely needed them since I run snow tires, but they are there in case I get truly bogged down in snow or mud when I am far from help.

 

If I had to tow on snow, I would also put the chains on all four tires of the truck, for sure!

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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The z style is ok I guess but I usually go with the diamond pattern for a smoother ride. They are harder to put on cars because you have to roll and retighten but being that you can jack the Oliver up off of the ground, I'm thinking that they will go on easy enough and tight the first time. Chaining up is a way of life in some places and every car is different. I don't have a problem towing in chain control areas when needed but it's not something that I really prefer because there are too many others out there driving with no experience. Unless someone has a reason for me to not go with a low profile diamond pattern, I will be grabbing some this week for our next rally. There shouldn't be snow but there already has been a dusting the other day, and once it ices up, it looks like this year will be a cold one here.

 

9037974962206.thumb.jpg.ba452ccab1928a3fa67b28e760ac6127.jpg

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Happy Camping,


null


Reed & Karen Lukens with Riffles our Miniature Poodle


2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Standard, Hull #200 / 2017 Silverado High Country 1500 Short Bed 4x4


Past TV - 2012 Mercedes-Benz ML350 4Matic BlueTEC Diesel


Click on our avatar pic above to find the videos on our Oliver Legacy Elite II


 

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I would absolutely hate to have to chain up the trailer to get out of a camping spot.  Why not stay an extra day or two. Or chaining up to get into a spot, why not wait a bit?  Or come back for the trailer in a few days?

 

But I suppose you could get into a situation trying to get over the Siskiyous to get home.

 

In that case ride quality would be secondary to maximum traction and that means large chain links. It also means chains running diagonal or diamond or whatever to help with sideways slipping.  But, there's not a lot of clearance, so I don't know how much you can get away with.  The whole idea sucks.

 

I believe, in CA, if you chain up the truck you must chain the trailer too.

 

I travel the mountains a lot in winter, without trailers, and I never chain up because I have 4WD and always use aggressive tires to avoid the problem.  When my father was still working, he would drive a few miles every morning, before dawn, on his way to work.  Then stop, remove the rear, chained up snow tires, and install a set of standard tires.  Then on the way home, he'd reverse the procedure and get home on the snow tires with chains.   The driveway was too steep to drive up, so he'd park at the bottom and walk/slide down every morning in the dark.  He did this very day, to and from work in the winter.  Yikes.

 

One morning he was on his way down and slipped.  He accidentally threw his keys up into the air while trying to recover.  But they didn't come down.  After looking for about an hour with a flashlight he got my Mom's set and went on.  They later found them stuck in a tree.  ????

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John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

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But I suppose you could get into a situation trying to get over the Siskiyous to get home.  

Exactly... You're going to want low profile. I'm not talking about getting out of a campsite, I'm talking about during chain control when there's not much of anything on the road as far as ice and snow. We pulled a friend's trailer home last year during the big flood, she didn't have chains, so I took the back road with light snow and had no problems, she was really happy to have her trailer back and it wasn't a big deal to tow it over the summit in the snow. That's when we were down by you guys last winter. I'm not wanting to put chains on to get out of a dirt camp site, just trying to obey the laws when they want me to chain up on the freeway or when dealing with ice. I have 2 snow plows and 2 snow blowers here at the house... I've driven in snow before and I even own real live snow shovels... I also used to have to park at the top of the hill and walk up to the car every morning during the winter but now I'm retired :)

 

Reed

 

 

 

Lots of good times up here on Lukens Mountain :)

 

I had to walk up hill in the snow both ways :)

 

 


Happy Camping,


null


Reed & Karen Lukens with Riffles our Miniature Poodle


2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Standard, Hull #200 / 2017 Silverado High Country 1500 Short Bed 4x4


Past TV - 2012 Mercedes-Benz ML350 4Matic BlueTEC Diesel


Click on our avatar pic above to find the videos on our Oliver Legacy Elite II


 

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