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  1. Here's a pretty easy project for owners of the Nature's Head toilet - a step to make the seat a more reasonable height. It's a slightly modified version of this new step from Squatty Potty. Since it's wood, it looks a lot better than the original plastic one, and also makes it pretty easy to modify. I wanted something that wouldn't take up most of the floor, so that we could leave it out and not have to worry about where to store it, so I scribed and cut notches on the legs to match the floor offset. That way it sits flush against the toilet and leaves plenty of room. As a bonus, the factory cutout matches the front of the Nature's Head pretty well without any modification. The legs do fold, so you could use it right out of the box if you wanted, and would be relatively easy to store - or just tip it up against the toilet. But making the notches and resealing it was a simple task and I kind of like that it looks a bit custom. It's polyurethaned and the hardware is chromed, so I suppose you could leave it out when showering, but it's easy enough to just prop it up behind the shower curtain so I'm sure that's what we'll do. I wish it were stained a bit darker to match the shower mat, but I wasn't concerned enough about it to bother with the sanding and staining. For a quick, two hour project, I think it turned out pretty well, and ended up just about the perfect height.
    9 points
  2. A wonderful couple arrived this morning to pick up their new to them Ollie #359. I'll let them introduce themselves when they are ready. Our time with Ollie was one filled with fun times, interesting places, and great new friends. I remembered what I went through during our orientation at our Ollie purchase - and lamented upon the stories shared here on the forum relating to things some didn't fully understand after the orientation and struggled with at the campground for the fist time. I did not want the new Oliver owners to go through a less than through purchase. So this was not the ordinary person to person sale - my goal was to share as much and many learnings as I could - fully explaining the systems, features, and quarks of Ollie ownership. The new owners left about 5 hours later - with a video history of the entire "orientation". I feel comfortable knowing Ollie is in good hands - and more importantly - the folks are set up to enjoy Oliver with reduced stress and concern. Tally Ho!! I know the Oliver family will take good care of them- and heartily welcome them when the time is right. To the future, RB Minus the Oliver.....
    8 points
  3. Many of us here in Ollie World are familiar with the beautiful woodwork of fellow Oliver owner Foy Sperring. Not long ago he introduced an extended dinette that adds 5” to the length, it’s been a very popular model. Our 2021 Oliver Elite II was ordered without the fiber granite (not an option on 2022 models), so we could invest that money into Foy’s woodwork. Andrew K suggested to me the dinette could be improved by adding 2” width on each side. We took a chance and asked Foy to make us a complete set of tops and cutting board in walnut. We also ordered the drawer organizers. We are thrilled with the outcome! The extra 5” length, 4” overall dinette width, is a good size, and looks great too. It’s amazing how much extra space is now available to us for dinner, and we don’t have to scoot way forward on the seat cushion to eat. The walnut looks terrific, but I think mahogany or other woods are beautiful too. This dinette top will not work as a bed, but we still have the fiberglass top if we take the grandchildren camping. We are very grateful we have a master craftsman like Foy on our team, I strongly recommend his products.
    8 points
  4. We picked up our trailer on Thursday and had a great orientation with the Oliver team. The delivery specialist was thorough, patient and knowledgeable. There were 2 very minor issues that were quickly resolved by the Service Department and we were on our way to David Crockett. We are enjoying David Crockett SP. It is clean, quiet and peaceful. This is our first RV. We did a very limited amount of tent camping many years ago. The forum has been invaluable to my wife and me. So many people to thank. We hope to learn enough about our trailer so that we can assist others at some point in the future. Thanks to all of you who so willingly share your knowledge, fantastic mods and simple tips which are so helpful especially to newbies like us! Safe Travels!
    8 points
  5. Debbie and I camped at Linville Falls Campground on the Blue Ridge Parkway earlier this week. It's a Federal campground without electric or water hookups, but beautiful and $10 per night with the geezer card. High temps were in the upper 70s. Table Rock Mountain just to the right of Ollie on NC Rt. 181 on the way to Linville Falls: We hiked a mile from Table Rock parking/picnic area to the top of Table Rock NC:
    7 points
  6. This is the second version of the our Storage Box. I find it interesting that when we were considering an Oliver, we ruled out the Storage Basket Option, because we thought it would add to much weight to the Tongue. The used 2019 Oliver we bought already had it so we took advantage of it, after we measured the Tongue Weight to make sure it was within our TV's Specs, Loaded 580 LBS. The Box is simply 1/2 Plywood inserted inside the Aluminum Basket. Note, the Piano Hinge Top and it's Drain Tube underneath the Hinge to keep water out. The Marine Cleat is part of out "Land Yacht" theme, We lock out E Bikes to them. Note we hook the Safety Chains to the eyelet on the front when not in use. Also a Trailer Level Gauge and Electrical Cord is stored in it's holder mounted to the front. The third pic, show inside the Box. I mounted the Tools/Items we use again and again! Also on the Back panel are Stainless Steel Vents to reduce condensation build up, which they do. Finally, note the Lock/Key which are Color Coded (Yellow) to the 2 locks on the Storage Box/Tailer Hitch/E Bikes/and everything else I can think of. The Latches are from the Marine Industry, again a Nautical Theme. Note we hook the Safety Chains to the eyelet on the front when not in use. Also a Trailer
    7 points
  7. Stony Fork Campground near Wytheville, VA.. A real gem! Nice deep sites (only 40+), multiple trout streams, clean restrooms/showers. received_971523106724921.mp4
    6 points
  8. Welcome to the "family". As you have already gathered, there are really no strangers here. You can ask questions, and you can expect many different answers, some may actually be correct. Welcome from Maine, and hull #211...
    6 points
  9. With 3 stars for Overland! Mossey
    6 points
  10. When we purchased our 2015 LE2 used during 2016 it had two group 27 12V lead acid batteries without factory solar. The following information & process has happened over a few years. Initially we purchased a Renogy 100W suitcase solar panel and used it charging the batteries through the trailer's 7 pin connector. Wanted to have a more efficient way to charge batteries. Installed a Furrion Solar port and mounted Renogy Waterproof solar charger in the battery compartment. Use about 36' of 10/2 cable with 12' sections from solar panel to Ollie's Furrion Port. Had to drill holes in Ollie's pretty finish for the Furrion Solar port next to battery compartment. Keep Ollie's fiberglass plug on my desk along with other interesting items : Furrion inlet under port bed: Renogy Solar 20A Waterproof Charge Controller mounted on plastic kitchen cutting board in battery compartment: When Ollie is in the shade it's nice to be able to reach out up to 36' placing panel in the sun, panel in lower LH corner of photo. Highest charge amperage seen using 36' of panel cable is 6 amps and highest charge amperage seen is 7.1 amps using one 12' section of solar cable. We purchased a Honda EU2000i to charge batteries on poor solar days. Installed a EZ start on the 13.5K Dometic AC so the Honda gen-set can also run the AC unit, or microwave, or hot water heater. Been actively reducing Ollie's weight when possible, currently Ollie's ready to camp weight is around 4950 pounds with full 6 gallon hot water tank and all other tanks empty as per CAT scales. Keep Ollie's spare tire in the TV bed and been using two 1 gallon LP gas bottles for a couple years. One gallon LP bottle will run the refrigerator for 4 days with morning use of cooktop with high outside temps in the 70s. I can also pick up a full one gallon bottle with three fingers. Replaced two group 27 12V (125 pounds) batteries with one BattleBorn 100AH Lithium (35 pounds) battery for loss of weight and Lithium battery performance benefits. Also installed the Progressive Dynamics Lithium charging section in our Progressive Dynamics convertor that BattleBorn said would work fine with their battery. Using the Honda gen-set connected to Ollie's 30 amp connection, the Progressive charger slowly drops charge amperage then cycles charge rate between .25 amps to .4 amps at full charge. BattleBorn told me not to worry about TV alternator damage when connected to TV with 7 pin plug with our system. They said because of charge cable's small diameter and distance from TV to battery, would not see very high amperage charge with TV connected. So far with BattleBorn battery at 75% charge while connected to TV with engine idling have not seen more than 3.5 amps of charge. Our TV has 180 amp alternator and with ignition turned off, the 12V power supply to Ollie is also switched off. Initially installed a Victron BlueTooth shunt to monitor the battery, but my Android 5 was not supported by the Victron system. Believe Victron unit is the way to go, but at the time my Android was not compatible so purchased an inexpensive shunt & monitor from Amazon to monitor the battery. Found a automotive 2" instrument mount on Ebay to mount the monitor: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FGFFHC6?psc=1&ref=ppx_yo2_dt_b_product_details The battery monitor is not waterproof, use a 1 1/8" hole saw to cut out 1" OD plastic cutting board plugs to fill the existing ventilation holes in the battery compartment door. Did not want to mount these plugs permanently, sealed with clear RTV silicone for easy removal: The benefits of the Lithium battery is much faster charging with gen-set or solar panel with plenty of battery capacity for our style of camping. Will be doing more camping without electricity and water connections with this system, too.
    6 points
  11. The cost may be significant, however, when you consider the years of pleasure you will experience, it doesn't seem that significant at all . . . Here's how my Elite I looks after 13 years.
    6 points
  12. So we were due to pickup in Feb. We prefer to boondock but we have spent the past 2 months making reservations for state parks ( the ones that had openings) and such - mapping harvest hosts out....so we could Pick up our Oliver, sight see Georgia, South Carolina Florida, Alabama (Bellingrath Gardens has been on my list) Gulf Coast without have to worry about were or if there was boon docking available. Take the Natchez Trace Parkway from Miss to Nashville, ending up at the Oliver Rally in May. Then head back to Az. When we originally placed our order we wanted a particular color and pinstripe we had seen on the site but for a 2022 they were no longer offering that. It was disappointing but not a deal breaker. We really wanted to get a hull # under 1000. We would have been 1024. Still not a deal breaker. We were notified earlier today that a slot had become available - pick up the end of Sept. If we went for this today...it will be a 2021. We get the color , pinstripe and hull # under what we wanted. We both agreed .... fate! We are getting exactly what we originally wanted! The only difference between the 21 and 22 will be the bearings - we will have to do the maintenance instead of the no maintenance ones on the 22. We already do that so no big deal. So we will be hull # 914 and be picking up the end of Sept. We have so many items on backorder sure hope they arrive but if not....we will make it work! Theresa
    5 points
  13. We’ve been working our way from San Antonio to Maine since early July, stopping at state parks, COE parks and HH locations. We recently stayed at a Winery/Farm in Rhode Island, Leyden Farms, a HH location. Their wine is good, the outdoor event area is great and they have really paid attention to where their HH guests park. A great location!
    5 points
  14. This isn't a full HOW TO install them, there are plenty of videos you can watch. Here's one: ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsEjREGiBj0 ... The most important thing is prep, you must get ALL the old junk and wax off or the adhesive won't stick well. I started with isopropyl alcohol, then followed up with 3M Adhesive Cleaner, with an old clean tee shirt. One big problem I had was with the rounded corners, they would not lie flat. This was indoors at 78 degrees F. I used a heat gun on LOW to warm the plastic, then pressed it down hard, and held it for a few seconds while it cooled. I then warmed the entire length and worked it hard against the gelcoat with a plastic tool and my fingers. The 3M VHB adhesive is heat activated and it set up well, and there are no worries of the gutters lifting, there is no need to tape everything down for days, as some people have done. I am not sure why I waited so long to do this mod, it isn't very difficult. However, I ran out of material and was unable to complete the rear window, so I am waiting on another 10 foot section. When I measured, I did not plan on running the gutters so far down the window frames.... I bought a 25 foot roll. Drat. Large windows 3 @ 76" = 19.0 feet Bathroom window 42" = 3.5 feet Fridge upper vent 21"= 1.75 feet Rear hatch 68" = 5.7 feet TOTAL 359" = 30 feet MINIMUM, buy this: ... Esssentials UW05004 Polar White 50' EZE RV Gutter John Davies Spokane WA
    5 points
  15. Our trailer is almost 6 years old; I have always run the fridge on propane during travels with no issues. The only time we switch over to 12V is when we have to use one of the tunnels in our area; they require all campers of any type to stop for inspection. You have to prove to them that the gas bottles are off. After we pass through the tunnel we stop and put the fridge back on propane. We have been doing this process for many decades.
    5 points
  16. I like to use an extra long shoe horn to slip my shoes on. I keeps me from having to bend over and possibly faint. I used 2 corsage pins stuck in the noggin bumper above the door to hold my shoe horn. Priceless.
    5 points
  17. I posted this back in 2018 but was reminded of this again this morning. While disconnecting my hose I noticed my city water female hose connection fitting was loose. The picture below shows the fitting after I removed the strainer/ washer. You need to carry a 1/2 inch hex key (Allen wrench) or you’ll have to use a bolt with a head that fits a 1/2 inch wrench. Just snug this fitting up after removing the strainer/washer. Be sure to replace the strainer/washer after tightening the fitting. Here is the post that I made about this back in 2018. Just disregard the threadjacking in the middle of the original thread.
    5 points
  18. Steve, if you put a foam noodle around your shoehorn and Velcro it above the door, you’d kill two birds with one stone. Stick a few corsage pins in the noodle and now you’ve got a place for your corsage pins. And another shoehorn.
    5 points
  19. We had Hull #026 from 2008 to 2013 and I know it is still being used. We now own Hull #050, the oldest Elite II on the road. Its build was started in late 2013 and delivered as the first one in early 2014. Between these two trailers, we've traveled to 49 states and covered over 150K miles.
    5 points
  20. My LE 2 is hull 106. Still doing great and looks close to new. Just getting ready to add the Dexter EZ Flex kit. I have all the parts, but need to work it into the schedule. Most upgrades have been done by Oliver as far as camera, inverter, battery pack, etc. Steve R. NE Texas
    5 points
  21. When looking for RVs I quickly zeroed in on fiberglass trailers. I looked at Casita as they are so close. Interior was a no go. Just felt cheap and carpet a huge turn off. Same for Scamp. Escape seems like a step up from those two but still not the same and while 5th wheel interesting interior was a hard pass. No trailer is perfect but Oliver interior are like nothing else. Now it isn’t for everyone but I smile every time I step inside my Ollie!
    5 points
  22. We spent a few nights up at Bear Den. We really enjoyed the 2800’ elevation and much cooler sleeping weather and of course camp fires and great food.
    5 points
  23. Of all the options available to you, the two that I consider essential to boondocking are the Solar Pro Package with the 6V AGM's and the Micro Air Easy Start. The AGM batteries will easily run your lighting, cabin fan, toilet fan, water pump, awning, charge your phones, etc. They will even run your TV if you have a signal. With direct sun the solar will keep up the charge during the day and provide the essential electricity needed after sunset. If your charge drops after a few cloudy days you can recharge the batteries with your generator. It won't always be sunny and you will certainly need a generator at some point (or wish that you had one). Air conditioning is sure nice to have on those hot humid nights when you can't get to sleep because you feel like you are being broiled alive. The Micro Air Easy Start will allow you to use a portable generator to run your air conditioning off of a small genset. It takes a lot of oomph to start the compressor on an AC unit. Once it is running the demand is not as high. The easy start feature allows you to use a smaller (lighter/less noise) generator than what would otherwise be required to start the compressor. We use a Honda EU2200i as do many others on this forum. I recommend that you figure that into your budget at around $1,100 and get the Easy Start option for the AC. The Elite has a 3-way refrigerator that runs wonderfully off of LP gas. No worries there. Food for thought... We have endured several power outages over the years that were caused by severe weather. We live at the foot of Lake Michigan. Thunderstorms tossing trees on power lines is not an uncommon occurrence. After the recent cyberattacks on our infrastructure, we considered getting a Generac nat. gas fired whole house generator to combat yet another potential cause of a power outage. I am glad that we did not go through the unnecessary expense. Keep the LP tanks full and a couple gallons of gas for the generator and we can just move into the Ollie if the power grid fails. In closing let me add one more suggestion. Don't upgrade the standard cushions to the KTT mattress yet. We have the standard foam cushions with Ultrafabric and find them to be very comfortable to sleep on. Far better than we expected. Try them first and see if you like them. We loaded up on options when we put down our initial deposit so that we could get in the queue for the build, and then trimmed them back on the final build sheet. That got things in motion and gave us time to educate ourselves and carefully consider each option. Good luck, and have fun with this!
    5 points
  24. I agree . . . . fussing with tech severely impairs the enjoyment we get from camping. One of our reasons for choosing Lithium was to reduce the time spent on battery maintenance and worrying about SOC. Now our biggest tech annoyance is keeping our phones charged (and remembering to plug them in). Not a problem when there's no cell reception and we always have the option of turning them off! Just to clarify: the point I was making, for those deciding between AGM and Lithium options, is that the cost differential between the AGM and Lithium upgrades is less than the $8,500 cost of the Lithium Pro Pkg. This would be the cost of upgrade from the standard battery configuration. After monitoring our lithium battery temps during the recent PNW heat wave, I will not be worrying about battery temperature. If conditions are such that battery life is reduced as a result of excessive heat, it's too warm, for my taste, to be camping 😎
    5 points
  25. I thought I would call Battle Born Batteries and ask them about this issue with camping in hot temps. First I looked at their website and found this information. Temperature restrictions on Battle Born Batteries Battle Born Batteries protect themselves from charging in cold temperatures and won’t accept a charge once the internal cell temperature drops to 24°F. At this point they will continue to discharge even down to -4°F. At this temperature we recommend no longer pulling power to avoid damaging the batteries. Insulated battery boxes, heating blankets, and placing your battery bank inside your RV will help keep the temperature stable. On the high end of temperature range, the batteries will shut down once 135°F is reached. When talking to the representative he advised me that I would see a slight loss of performance in 105 and plus degrees battery temperature but it would not hurt your battery and it would retain it normal performance once you were in cooler climate and battery temp drop below 105 degrees, also the battery will shut down once 135 degrees is reached in the battery. He said that it has not been a problem with RV users. I think in the case of the Oliver with it's battery not in the direct sunlight I don't think they'll be a problem. I would suggest anyone trying to make a decision on what battery type to buy should contact the battery manufacture and get all of their concerns answered. I know at Battle Born the rep was very knowledgeable and friendly and would probably talk to you all day. Paul
    5 points
  26. It's hard to believe that I'm finally sitting in my own Oliver as I write this. Picked up yesterday with a fantastic walkthrough with Hanna. I had a long checklist of things to go over and questions to ask. Hanna anticipated everything and really impressed me with her knowledge and attention to detail. I told myself that I wasn't going to be one of those people who has to run over to Tractor Supply to get the right hitch, but I was! LOL. After about 300 miles on highways, winding country lanes, rainstorms and potholes, I can say that everything is great. No problems. What can I say? Great company. Great product. In coming days I'll add some posts on some specific components and Hanna's answers to some of my questions that you'll all find interesting.
    4 points
  27. I went back and reread JD's post about his drawer restraints and replacing the drawer front with the pantry style latch and I now see the relevance between the 2 posts. I will admit to not reading JD's post in it’s entirety as I had previously read his, yours and Reed's version of drawer restraints. So I thought I was up to speed, which reminds me of father's axiom "don’t think, you’ll weaken the ball club". And that reminds me of another of his many axioms, "never resist the opportunity to keep your mouth shut"- nuff said, Mossey
    4 points
  28. @JRKI know I’m going to catch a lot of ribbing for showing this. My Oliver mentor @KountryKampergives me crap about it all of the time for carrying this stuff. But I went over the entire camper and took pictures of the data plates and data labels on everything showing model numbers and serial numbers. I then downloaded AND PRINTED all the manuals for the devices, pieces, parts, etc., from the companies that made them and made sure the manuals were for the serial number range of the devices that I had (especially Dometic, Truma, Atwood stuff) and put them in (2) 3-ring binders because sometimes you do not have the ability to look at the internet. I found that some of the manuals available on the Oliver site were wrong for my camper. In addition to owners manuals you can also find service manuals, parts drawings and installation manuals for a lot of the stuff on your trailer. Look for data plates and labels on devices. Some are not easy to find.
    4 points
  29. Hi Sherry, I used to be an ornithologist (biologist who studies birds), and one of my jobs was sage grouse. We had multiple tasks. One of the tasks was just finding, trapping, aging, putting on backpacks that monitored movements. Because we were in a remote location in western CO, we had to live in a low-quality travel trailer that was towed to state-owned property very high up in the mountains. We basically lived on the side of a mountain just above aspen trees. Then we would take ATVS out to do our jobs, riding 45 mph around to get wherever we needed to get, racing the afternoon thunderstorms. As the states don't have much $, especially when it comes to biology, we lived in trailers that didn't work (and only get hired for 6 months at a time that way we stayed temp with no benefits). They would give us a battery and gas, but the only thing that worked was gas for cooking food. We had to bring our own water. It was really cold, I mean really cold. I wore the 7 layers of clothes and was still freezing. I had the clearest skin I ever had because my skin was exposed to the air for literally 5 minutes in a day when I changed my clothes as fast as possible because it was so cold. So essentially I lived in a hard-sided tent. It was hard work. Great to be outside.
    4 points
  30. Yes but I had the corsage pins. And if I really knew the cost of the corsages and the event that was involved they probably cost me more than Velcro. But I do like Velcro. I love the sound of Velcro. Makes me want to drink Tang.
    4 points
  31. It's been a much debated subject over the years. Originally, Oliver called them jacks and they were fine with owners lifting the tires off the ground if needed. (I've done that many times.). But there was a bit of a design issue with the earlier trailers in that the bracket to carry the jack was made of welded aluminum plates. A few brackets failed at the welds, which is obviously potentially pretty dangerous. They changed the bracket design to a steel angle, but also changed their tune on using the jacks as jacks. They became stabilizers and the tires stay on the ground. Except for a dwindling number of us rebels who throw caution to the wind. For me, I'm good with one set of tires off the ground, provided the slope of the site isn't crazy. But never both sets, since the jacks aren't really designed for lateral loads.
    4 points
  32. On my way to do a little fishin I stopped at Chris' Camp in Spearfish, SD. At checkin a worker at the park excitedly told me that there was another one of "dem" campers that he'd never seen before right here in the camp. He insisted that I hop into his gold cart so he could show me and we drove to site 74 but nobody was home. Hopefully we'll get a chance to have a mini-rally later! Bill
    4 points
  33. We've just recently become the third owner of #36, we call her 3-Dozen. In most details its seems as good as new to us. We're thrilled to be in the OTT community now and know we have many great years of adventures ahead.
    4 points
  34. I should add that I have the 4x12volt lead acid wet cell battery configuration as a big reason why my portable solar panel setup works well vs. John’s concerns. Nominal full charge voltage for lead acid wet cell is approximately 12.7 volts. So my setup through the 7 pin connector can tolerate a few tenths of a volt drop through the wiring length. The controller on the Zamp portable panel has selection options for battery type. For AGM batteries, nominal full charge voltage is 13.0 volts. Not sure about lithium nominal full charge voltage but I believe it’s even higher than the AGMs. I know the lead acid wet cells get a bad reputation as needing a lot of maintenance but mine have been almost zero maintenance into our third year of camping. I check the water level regularly and they have only needed very small amounts of water once. When they do eventually needs replaced I’m still on the fence about which option to go with then.
    4 points
  35. FWIW, I don't worry about temperature either. I think if you want to wring out every last amp hour out of lithiums, then sure, obsess over temperature - otherwise, avoid extremes and they should be fine. If I lived in southern Arizona and could only keep my trailer in the sun, then I might give some thought to moving the batteries somewhere cooler. Or if I lived in North Dakota and had to dig my trailer out of the snow every spring, then I'd do the same.
    4 points
  36. I agree with Frank and his extremely large map. Moisture is something you'll have to deal with in any trailer, but I wouldn't say that it's problematic in an Ollie to any degree. My opinion on the mattress pad was and is that condensation is entirely an issue with the optional perforated latex mattress. I think that the perforations give body moisture a direct path to the underside of the mattress, where it can easily condense. We never had a problem with a different mattress, nor with the cushions that we switched to later, and the only people who ever reported a problem had the latex mattresses. So, I'd say that if you get the latex mattress, then definitely get a pad; but if not, then don't worry about it. You can also use a cheap thermarest pad or something similar rather than Oliver's rather pricey option. Unless it's standard now - may be. What we did find, though, is that when I sleep, I'll end up with my back against the side wall at some point, and so I'll get condensation there on the wall - enough to wake up with the sheets wet. I solved that problem by just just sleeping with the back cushions in place and that's plenty of insulation to prevent condensation, and still leaves plenty of width for me to sleep comfortably. That's the extent of any moisture issue that has required more thought from us than just a little ventilation. Also, Oliver has improved the insulation since our trailer was built, so a newer one might not have the same problem. So in general, unless it's just super cold out, we'll have a window cracked and that's been enough that we won't see any condensation except when cooking or showering. And running the max fan on its lowest setting and running the bath fan for a minute after showering easily prevents condensation from those two activities. I don't even think the mirror door fogs up when we shower, so that's pretty good. I'll leave the bath door open and the bath window cracked when we're gone for the day to remove moisture from the shower drying out. I also tend to wipe down the shower with a squeegee and towel after showering, which gets rid of a lot of that. I suspect that Casitas do have condensation, but it's under the carpet so you can pretend it's not there. 😁
    4 points
  37. To have a more central organized spot to charge our iPads and iPhones I ordered this power strip. I purchased the white cord moulding from Lowe’s which has a strong adhesive strip on the back. It matches fairly close. It’s a fairly straight forward install and really cleans things up a bit. I have ordered one for the galley so we don’t have the coffee pot cord or toaster cord dangling in the air while in use. It has pretty solid reviews and has worked well for us so far. I used a small piece of white Velcro to hold it in place while in travel.
    4 points
  38. Yesterday, I could not send PMs or post here using my laptop with Firefox browser, this laptop/browser combination has worked fine for the last two years here. Tried using my "new to me" Apple smartphone to send a PM on the forum today and it worked fine. Using my laptop right now with Brave browser and it's working great. Don't know if it has anything to do with forum updates, but if anyone is having issues posting or sending PMs, try another browser. I'm not a knowledgeable computer person, but wanted to share my recent experiences. Test Photo of lithium/solar upgrade battery box:
    4 points
  39. Great suggestion - you should get a badge for that!!
    4 points
  40. You have to discount the $8500 by the cost of upgrade from lead-acid to AGM, less the price difference between 2000w and 3000w inverter. I don't know the current costs; yes, I'm a retired bean counter 😁
    4 points
  41. Yeah. Enjoy the dopamine spurts while they last
    4 points
  42. Yes, it is thrilling! I suddenly have a bunch of cool badges , but I seem to be stuck at the Newbie level since 2015….. I feel like the day I joined the Cub Scouts, more than a few years ago….. Maybe a moderator can explain this new and exciting system😬 However, I do really think I should be a Rookie by now. Do I have to send doughnuts to somebody? if you zoom in on a badge icon it says “Rare”. That must be good, like a rare pokémon card….. I do not yet have a Conversation Starter badge, Susan, I am a little jealous. Could I have yours? John Davies Spokane WA
    4 points
  43. I've researched, but never found a good answer, on the question of how much hot temps in storage affect lithiums vs hot temps while in use. Victron lists a max storage temp some 70° higher than the max operating temp for their batteries, so I do assume that the storage temperature is less damaging, at least to some degree.
    4 points
  44. There's always going to be the engineering issue of the wheel wells, and front/back weight balance. The Oliver, with its double hull, can't really be set flat and high above, imo, like a lot of sunblock stickies. That creates a bit of a conundrum with a walk around queen, I guess,, unless it's located forward, like airstream does it, in that size range. (Which I dislike, but I understand the "why." I'll be interested in seeing what Oliver comes up with,, if/when a larger trailer is designed. In the meantime, these many threads should give them input on what potential buyers feel is important. I'll probably still stick with my 2008. It's likely to be roadworthy for decades to come, long past my desire to travel and camp.
    3 points
  45. Ours isn't stark at all ... 🤔
    3 points
  46. My 2016 came with BF Goodrich light truck tires. Then they went to Michelin. The current tire is made by Cooper, which I used to replace my 5 year old BF Goodrich’s. Oliver has a good track record on tires, all have been good. Mike
    3 points
  47. You are correct about not finding the amp-hours (AH) specs spelled out online. However, I was able to find one bit of information about these batteries; they have a 25 amp reserve capacity (RC) of 140 minutes. This is enough information to calculate the amp hour rating. The reserve capacity of a battery is the number of minutes for which it can run at 25 amps of current without its voltage dropping below 10.5 volts. As all babies in jungle know, at 10.5 volts your batteries are dead dead. Voltage relates charge and energy by describing the amount of energy in each coulomb of charge. AH is a different unit for describing the same quantity. In order to convert RC to AH you first need to multiply the reserve capacity by 60 to convert it to seconds: 140 minutes x 60 = 8400 seconds Next multiply this length of time by 25 (amps): 8400 x 25 = 210,000. This is the number of coulombs of charge in the battery. Next divide this answer by 3,600, which is the number of coulombs in an AH: 210,000 / 3600 = 58, the number of amp-hours in the battery. So these batteries are 58 AH each, wired in parallel totaling 232 total AH or 116 usable AH (at the 50% discharge limit.)
    3 points
  48. Welcome and congrats on your upcoming Oliver! I’m not a tire expert by any means, but I’ve learned a lot from sites like Tire Rack that lists specs and provides explanations of those specs. There are some pretty knowledgeable members here that can give some good advice. Stand by! Mike
    3 points
  49. GAP, curious whether the Xantrex techs that said it wasn't suggested gave any reasons (I'm assuming they know it works). The one's that said it doesn't work should actually get some hands on experience with the devices as opposed to thinking they understand everything just from manuals - IMHO of course! 😉 I've used this software switch (off is really on wrt the charger btw) literally dozens of times since I discovered it and it works every time without throwing any error codes. If I trip the breaker like I used to, I get the infamous Xantrex [20] lost communication error code - per design if you throw the breaker rather than a bug. So, I respectfully disagree with the Xantrex tech(s) that said it doesn't work. I think if it's bad for anything it's not the batteries - so I'd much rather replace the cheap Inverter than the Lithiums. I also appreciate the savings I'm getting avoiding rotator cuff surgery if I had to continuously reach under the bed for that breaker like I used to. 🙂
    3 points
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