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  1. I made a sheet metal box to fit in the space but not hit or rub on any wires or tubing. It is suspended from the flange so it can not drop down. It is easy to remove and reinstall.
    16 points
  2. Please be patient as I continue to find and resolve the issues in the server hosting the forums. I do not know what caused it, as nothing has been changed but possibly a background update on the server software. For now I have it semi-working and I will continue working on it until it is back 100%. Thank you for your patience and sorry for any inconveniences. - Jason
    13 points
  3. Hello Everyone, We only started looking at Oliver Travel Trailers a couple months ago due to a need we had in the family. After reading everything we could find and watching lots of videos we decided it was the one for us. On our way home from a 36 day driving vacation out west, we decided to get an appointment to tour the factory and talk to someone in person. We met with Anita on 9/23 for the tour and discussion. As someone mentioned earlier there were several Ollie's sitting in the parking lot awaiting pickup. However, there was also one whose owner had a major health issue and was not able to pick up his 2021 Elite II. Anita told us to take a look at it. We fell in love. It had more options than we were planning to purchase, but since it was a 2021 the cost was within our budget. We bought it! And we pick it up next Wednesday, Oct. 6. We are so excited and can't wait to take our first trip. We have learned so much from these forums and are looking forward to learning a lot more from you pros. We are totally new to camping. We both recently retired and looking forward to many years in our Oliver. Thank you all for the wonderful information you have shared. Kathy
    12 points
  4. We have spent the last two nights in our trailer and it has been very enjoyable. Picked up #905 on the 29th and stayed in the lot for a night and the second night out at the Merriwether Lewis State park to test out no hookups. Good results so far. Jason Lindsey has really helped us out. We have been in contact trying to make the big step since early 2019. We also had a great gal giving us the orientation on the trailer. Hannah was knowledgeable, very thorough,and just a real nice person to talk with. We really enjoyed the walk through with her. Thank you Oliver !!! It feel like just what I thought. A quality product easy to start our adventures in. All the Forum folks contributing info I truly thank you and will use you in the future. Sincerely. Tina and Mike Locker. Dream Girl is what I call our trailer and my Wife Tina !!!!!
    11 points
  5. Not one single thing to complain about, Thus far its everything I expected and more. Tows like a dream behind the One-Ton (no anderson hitch just a 2-5/16 Ball.) My tongue weight is 610 Lbs. Fresh Water Tank is Full rest empty. My Hitch provides the actual weight on the spot. I can imagine others have a much higher tongue weight as I am single and pack very light in comparison to most. I do have two 15 gallon water jugs in the front box that I bought filled and strapped there to increase the tongue weight because at 490 Lbs. (This was the exact weight when I pulled it out of the factory and for the first 500 miles before I put any of my stuff inside of it) I was feeling a bit more feedback from the trailer than I appreciate and I figured the additional weight would change its attitude. It did and having the extra water along is a plus until I hit cold country next week then I may change them out for a couple sand bags. Before JD tells me the front box is only rated for 150 Lbs... I know... Its fine and I will beef it up before my next trip. I will post a couple pics when I get better service or home I think this Weigh Safe hitch may be something others find helpful especially if your in a situation where tongue weight is critical due to your tow vehicle. A quick google of "weighsafehitch" and you will be looking at it. I can attest to the fact that it works well and is much faster then finding and weighing on a CAT scale at a truck stop especially if your experimenting with different weights to find your comfort zone. At any rate Props to Oliver for building a quality product in a time when that is not so common anymore and I was very impressed with their staff and how I was treated by them on my pick up day. They are all working hard to push these units out the door but they are doing it with Grace and I appreciate that a lot and they deserve the credit for it. I have attended three Nascar races in a row now (I did not have the Oliver yet for the first two) and will be dry camping in the infield of Kansas City Speedway this weekend, this will be my first time dry camping and I am sure I will exceed the tanks capacity but they do have service running there to pump and fill so I am REALLY not dry camping but I will give it a go and see how long I can get by.... Trouble is that insta hot water heater works very well and it only takes a handful of showers to top off the grey when the water does not get cold. Oh, and the towel hooks somebody was hating on in their blog? they work perfectly, my towels have not fallen off in over a thousand miles and I doubt they ever will but you DO have to know how to hang the towel properly on this style hook..... thanks Grandma for that lesson years ago! Happy Trails Everyone, From Guthrie Oklahoma... For Now...
    11 points
  6. Steve Landrum Update The past weekend, a fellow traveler and Oliver owner , Steve Landrum / Tali were preparing their Ollie to travel to the Oliver Rally in Florida that Foy Sperring is organizing. Steve was gathering up his gear and went to open a large gate at his home. It held stubbornly tight and then suddenly released sending Steve to the ground where he hit his head. At first he seemed to be OK , but last night at 12:30, Monday morning, Steve requested Tali call an ambulance because his pain was so intense. At the hospital the exam revealed Steve has a subdural hematoma, a bleeding of the brain. The bleeding was significant but treatment with blood thinners and new blood was necessary before surgery. Early this morning (Monday), the surgery was completed and Steve is currently in Intensive Care Unit at the hospital in Tupelo Mississippi where he and Tali worked for years. The physicians are saying that if all goes well, Steve should have a 90% recovery from this accident. However, the next 4 days are critical. The doctors are constantly monitoring Steve’s progress, his blood and carefully regulating his medication. Tali recently had surgery on her foot and recovery for her is slow and painful. Today while Steve was being treated, Tali had to go in to her surgeon for wound care and treatment. Mobility for Tali is very difficult for her now. Steve’s daughter and son-in-law live nearby and are providing care for both Steve and Tali. Tali’s desire is that she be able to focus all of her attention on supporting Steve as well as recovering from her foot surgery. For this reason, Tali requests that you turn toward God and spend time in prayer that Steve will have a full and complete recovery. She values the prayers from each of you and Steve will greatly benefit from Our Lord’s healing grace that will result from your prayers. As I receive communication from Tali, I will post Steve’s progress. Thank You
    10 points
  7. This storage container is a perfect fit for the back of the basement. Plano, 68 quart, medium storage trunk.
    10 points
  8. About four years ago I found Oliver and these forums while browsing the Airstream forums looking for our 1st Travel Trailer (some tenting camping). The next four years consisted of mostly reading these forums, sending for brochures, to "unofficially" spec'ing out ours (dreaming), to using the referral program to see one in person, and to finally scheduling a tour this past Monday. I was impressed with the detail and thought that Oliver puts into these but not surprised since so many on here had prepared me without any of you knowing it. We sat down with Jason and went thru all the options then the question came, "do you want to secure a production date?". I couldn't have been more happy to tell him absolutely. So we now have a delivery date next July (15th I believe). We are newbies to the travel trailer scene and look forward to meeting many of you over the next few years. I will continue scouring these pages to help me finalize the options before April and to help prepare us for alittle life on the road.
    9 points
  9. Just saw this short article which was complementary of the Oliver Elite. https://www.autoevolution.com/news/legacy-elite-travel-trailer-is-americas-little-known-weapon-in-rv-world-game-171724.html
    8 points
  10. 7 points
  11. Link to Catalog A lot of great ideas and craft have come together to get this catalog update ready. New products, new choices in wood, and new finishes to match Oliver’s décor options. I have used the most common questions about my craft to layout this catalog and help you decide what your style is and fits your needs. I now have a new email address for orders and questions – FoyablesInWood@gmail.com. Lastly – as we all have seen around us my prices have increased. Everything from wood, finishes, supplies, and freight has jumped in the last 4 months. If you have an order place with me, your grandfathered into the old pricing. All orders from October 1st are under this new pricing structure. Onward, Foy 517933762_FoyblesCatalogV3.1f.pdf
    7 points
  12. Camp pillows that tickled my funny bone...
    6 points
  13. Oliver in Wild - We spent 5 nights here - https://riversedgemountainrvresort.com and did a little exploring around Nantahala National Forest, Vogel State Park, Blairsville, and Brasstown Bald. Rib Country is now are most favorite barbecue joints in Murphy…awesome cue!! We were camping among the giant RVs.😄 Lots of large motorhomes and big 5th wheels. The RV park was extremely clean and well kept and had large concrete pad sites. We met a number of super nice people during our stay. We took our bicycles in order to do a shake down of our 1Up USA (2) bike rack. We loved having our bicycles with us, it was just great to pedal tour around the park. The 1Up USA Super Duty bike rack performed excellent with no issues during our trip. The license plate relocation bracket arrived while we were gone so I installed it when we got home. I may add an LED license plate light. A few pics of our site, bike rack and views along the way. Bike rack loaded without the license plate relocation kit. Plenty of tail light visibility but needed the license plate relocation bracket. Bike rack deployed- Rack in upright store position- Our site - Looking from Nantahala National Forest up towards the Smoky Mtns. Already missing the higher elevations of the mountains -
    6 points
  14. Update:. Coy Gayle posted an update on Steve and though prayers are still needed Steve has started his road of recovery. 🙏
    6 points
  15. Over the years I've tried almost everything out there to include taping the ends, putting sticks/nails and other commercially made "stoppers" in open tubes of caulk. But, nothing really did a great job of keeping the caulk from drying out. Early last year I saw a Youtube video that talked about a canister that is used to help save open tubes of caulk. So, I bought two. Today, I had reason to use both a Liquid Nails solvent based construction adhesive and a DAP latex sealant/caulk that I had last used about 11 months ago. Both were not much different than when I put them into the canisters. With the price of caulk as high as it is, I'm convinced that the AirTite canister will save me money and the hassle of adding to the landfill. I bought mine on Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07PQSZ5YH/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Bill
    6 points
  16. Hmmm? ... problem solved! So, I determined it was not a propane issue as the gas stove was working fine. Then I figured perhaps all the dust that was stirred up while traversing the Pawnee Grasslands gravel roads was a possibility. I opened the hatch to the water heater and simply blew out the compartment (yeah, with my own mouth/breath) - then tested the water heater and it fired right up. Then, blew out the intake/exhaust ports of the furnace. From there went inside, opened the access hatch to the furnace (curb side rear) and learned that it would be very difficult to do any disassembly given the cramped quarters in there ... but, for the heck of it, used some compressed air (in a can) and blew through several of the vented openings and into the collar where the wiring exits the box. Viola! ... turned the thermostat switch back on and set the temp at 75 degrees ... fan kicked on (just like before) and a minute or so later the furnace fired up! Thanks guys for the thoughts and suggestions ... when I get back home will need to do a thorough cleaning and check everything closely. Cheers! -Dan
    6 points
  17. We even had UT orange shirts made for everyone who helps us with our renovation.
    6 points
  18. True, but what trailer manufacturer does? Remember that B2B chargers are what's required, and while Sterling has been around the marine world for a while I think, they weren't well known in the trailer or overland community until the past few years. So the trailer world has traditionally just ignored the fact that the vehicles could't charge the batteries; just up to now the battery banks were too small for anyone to care (also, people assumed that the charge that they got from their solar while on the road was coming from their truck). Truth is, I think adding a B2B charger to either lithium package is more likely to add another layer of disappointment. Beneficial, yes; but still inadequate. I don't think that Oliver's sin is so much the lack of B2B charging, but that they aren't communicating the limited ability of either that or their solar to charge a super large battery bank. In their defense, most owners find the subject to be pretty opaque. But FYI to all potential buyers, there's a very limited use case for a large battery bank without also investing in large panels and perhaps also a B2B system; i.e., it makes sense only if you're planning to use power at a faster rate than you can recover. There is, and I can't stress this enough, no way to recharge them for continuous use, at least not one that makes sense with this trailer - Oliver's solar package will provide about 70Ah on average, and B2B charging maybe 100 for an 8 hour drive. Even on a long, sunny drive, you would only plan for 170 Ah even with B2B. Not 350, and certainly not 570, which is what would be required to recharge an exhausted pro or platinum LFP package. So, at the end of the day, either your consumption is within those charging limits (in which case, you didn't need the batteries); or you carry a generator to recharge them (in which case, you didn't need the batteries); or you use electricity with wild abandon for six days and then go plug in or run that generator for 6 hours (at least you had 6 days of quiet). I'm not saying no one should buy them; but wow, everyone should give it some deep thought before doing so. There's advantages, just few and far between.
    6 points
  19. I have used a piece of oak to mount a battery cutoff switch and I really don’t see any problems with it. If that board rots, I definitely have bigger problems. Whichever lumber, plastic or wood I use, I put stainless t-nuts on the backside and use pan head machine screws to mount the device. Mossey
    6 points
  20. That looks pretty handy.. and got me wondering about what other folks stuff into the basement and what kind of storage solutions they have come up with… Heres what we’ve got stashed away.. a tote with a couple 50’ water hoses and assorted “water gear”, a sort of spool I made with two 25’ cords wrapped around it and related testers and adapters in its center… a milk crate full of blocking of various sizes (6x6s, 2x6s 1x6s etc) and a box I made full for an assortment of tools and gear aimed at quick repairs and trouble shooting without getting into the “real toolbox” that lives in the truck. the tote and spool go in first… followed by the crate of blocking, and the tools.. the remaining space is where I stow the wheel chocks
    6 points
  21. This is a great spot on Energy Lake. It is a spot we stopped at on our way from Tennessee to Wisconsin. It was in The Land Between the Lakes and was really fun. A great spot was The Homeplace 1850 Interperative Center. Pioneer log buildings and everything that an old farm would have. Tina and I loved this spot. Volunteers doing things that would be done in those times. It was memorable. Tina and Mike
    5 points
  22. I believe this is so you can drain the fresh tank without lifting the mattress. I can do it, but the contortions leave me with muscle cramps. It’s easier to lift the mattress. I think a bigger access port would work better. Mike
    5 points
  23. This, I like - I never cared much for Oliver's sink and faucet choices and I'd actually planned to supply them a sink and faucet to get installed on the line. Unfortunately the one I wanted wouldn't work and I was having trouble getting the proper dimensions from Oliver, so I just let it go and figured I'd replace it later. Well, that was a good idea until I realized that the cutout Oliver made for the sink was way too big for any of the bar sized sinks that I could find. And all of the full sized kitchen sinks were too big to fit. But finally I stumbled across this oversized bar sink from Franke. It's the 17" Franke Vector. Overall, it's the same width as the existing sink, but the lip is narrower, so the bowl itself is a bit wider. Mainly the sink is much longer and deeper. In overall volume, it's over twice as large as the original sink, but takes up no more counter space. Can't beat that. And because it's farther forward and 3" deeper, it doesn't splash all over the place like the original. In fact, I can even turn the faucet up all the way without it splashing over the front of the sink, which is novel. I like the Franke sinks in that they have the straight sides and look of a modern zero radius sink, but they do add a slight radius to the corners so that you can actually keep them clean. Installation wasn't too hard. I'd rate it 7/10. The difficulty was that I had to modify the base cabinet for it to fit. There's a wood brace running across the top front that is screwed to the fiberglass beneath the drawer trim, which had to be cut out, and also a portion of the left side of the cabinet. That sounds like a lot of structural support to remove, but the cabinets are mainly tied in at the bottom and I ran it past Jason beforehand to make sure I wasn't looking at it wrong. I have to say that the cabinets are stoutly built, and I'm not at all worried about it. The second problem I ran into was that my countertop wasn't perfectly flat. It bowed down in the middle slightly which wasn't apparent until I installed the sink. But I was able to temporarily shim the counter against the top of the cabinet while the silicone seal dried and then I glued PVC blocks around the perimeter of the sink to both hold it in place and to level the counter. The Franke sinks have an odd installation clip that wasn't designed with hollow core fiberglass in mind, so the blocks were necessary anyway. It's not going anywhere now. Of course I lost use of the flip out drawer but I hated that thing anyway. I glued a few ½" blocks to the front of the sink and then fixed the drawer front to the blocks with heavy duty velcro, just in case I ever need to remove it for some reason. The sink depth worked out perfectly with the existing cutout on the back of the middle drawer to clear the drain. I thought I was going to have to get a Hepvo trap to make it all clear but Oliver actually places the trap behind the cabinet, so no problem. I did have to get the narrowest profile elbow I could find to attach to the drain basket, so I had to go with cheap plastic rather than PVC, but such is life. At the end of the day, however, I decided to use a different drain basket that was a bit deeper, so I had to make the drawer cutout about a half inch deeper after all. The faucet is a Grohe that I found on sale at Home Depot for about half price, so that was a nice find. It has a really nice feel to it and unlike the sink, was a cinch to install. Grohe has a trick installation method that allows you to work from above so that one person can do it without crawling under the counter a hundred times. Oliver's hot and cold lines are convenient to get to and there's an access panel in the back of the cabinet that can be removed if you need more room to work. The only issue I ran into was that the counterweight for the sprayer was getting caught up on everything that's packed in the back of the cabinet. To fix it, I made a tube from some flexible plastic sheeting that I had lying around and just slid that over the sprayer hose. Now the hose slides easily inside the tube and as a benefit, the weight won't bang around inside the cabinet while traveling. So that's about it. I've learned that I don't have the patience or foresight to take progress pictures Like John does, so my description will have to do. But I'm happy to answer any questions.
    5 points
  24. Steve had surgery for a “brain bleed”. Carol just texted Tali and he is now out of surgery. Keep him in your prayers. Mike
    5 points
  25. I'm super excited tonight, because my best camping friend of many decades is here. We started tent camping, (in the 70s), did motorhome camping together, and last 14 years, travel trailer camping together, in separate trailers, on so many amazing trips. We both share other camping friends, and stories. It's a wonderful time swapping stories, and being back together. Tomorrow, newer friends (only a decade or so) will join us. It will be awesome, no matter the weather. We'll miss some other friends who couldn't make the trip this time. I truly treasure the friends I've made camping here, and around the world, and north America. We'll be missing you, @bugeyedriver and @JuniorBirdMan, this trip. We'll photoshop you into the group photo.
    5 points
  26. I was having an issue with reduced water flow at the outside shower head. Thinking it might be the usual mineral buildup or plastic shavings issue in the hose or shower head, I decided to disassemble things starting with the shower head and working upstream. No mineral buildup or plastic shavings found, but when I removed the flex hose from the valve assembly, I did discover that the rubber washer that seals the flex hose to the valve assembly was swollen to the point that it was almost completely restricting the flow of water from the anti-siphon check valve inside the valve assembly. I’ve only used the normal chemicals in the water system for cleaning, disinfection, and winterizing (vinegar, bleach, and RV anti-freeze). But the seal obviously didn’t like one or some combination of those chemicals. I replaced the seal with one from my plumbing parts stash and now the flow is back to normal. Just something else to check for anyone noticing reduced water flow. Just be careful when removing the flex hose. There are several small parts to the little check valve inside
    5 points
  27. I'd also add that I've never had dealings with a company that is so straight forward and willing to correct virtually any issue that is their "fault" (and even some that aren't their fault). Maybe its the location, maybe its the Oliver owners, or some combination, but, it is a wonderful company to do business with in my experience. Bill
    5 points
  28. The mobile unit 2 is headed back to the nest to have the battery/solar/electric upgraded. First stop: Kettletown Campground in CT.
    5 points
  29. We made it. I'm happy to report the grass is growing at the Ollie Campsites.
    5 points
  30. Yeah, I opted for the 400ah of Lithium because we often camp for 1-2 weeks in partial to full shade here in WA, so we can run some deficit each day and still be ok for quite a few days that way before we need shore power (I'm less interested in running a generator for several hours in a row periodically). I opted in knowing that we'd rarely if ever use anything near the total stored charge in a day but for our scenario this still offers significant convenience. A week under big trees in the Olympics in May confirmed the choice, though it would have taken another week to be getting concerned about getting too low.
    5 points
  31. Honestly, people get phobic about "wood." As mounting, wood/marine plywood is an excellent material. Holds fasteners well, everyone (mostly) has tools to work with it, and water resistance is built in. Lasts a really long time. What's not to love?
    5 points
  32. Scubarx brought up an important point on the Norcold. I, too, advise owners to manually select the power source each time. The older dometics didn't ever default to dc. The norcold will, if left in auto, and can leave some with depleted batteries unknowingly. There are a few areas where you must turn off propane tanks, not just the fridge. Many ferries require it, and some check and tag the bottle at boarding. Some tunnels, either because they're heavily trafficked, or don't have the typical little rise in the center. They're usually clearly marked, and have an alternative route, or have a pullout area to turn off tanks. Most can be avoided with planning, and if not, it's just a minor inconvenience.
    5 points
  33. That is great customer service, and a little unexpected IMHO; take him a some doughnuts the next time you go there. A positive review on Yelp would also be appreciated, I am sure…. John Davies Spokane WA
    5 points
  34. I can't believe that right after I read your post, the next day I get a call from the manager of the place where I store my Oliver 2018 Elite II that there is some kind of alarm going off in my trailer. When I went by to take a look, sure enough it was the propane/carbon monoxide sensor. The date on the back of the sensor was January 25, 2015. This post probably saved me a bunch of time. I just took the old one out and ordered a new one. Thanks!
    5 points
  35. I took this picture today after we arrived at McConnell AFB in Wichita, KS. We were struck by the size difference of our Oliver surrounded by some huge trailers…. Mike
    4 points
  36. What is this "minimalist camping" of which you speak?
    4 points
  37. The change to the two axle E2 does make backing less exciting than your ‘highly responsive’ Casita, but it is longer and you will notice the difference from the easy in-out ability of the Casita. I still miss it. I pulled my 17’ Casita for years using three different different generations of Toyota Land Cruisers. At 3000lbs it wasn’t until I got to my 2013 with the 5.7 Tundra engine that it felt painless. Moving to the the 5-6k lb E2 was like taking a step back to the 2007 4.7 small V8. That said, after a three week, 2500 mile trip from Texas to Ouray, CO this summer I found it worked well. 4th gear is standard, but I was able to stay with traffic pretty easily, generally 45-65+. Gas mileage was abysmal, but comes with the territory. A big 1/2 ton or easily a 3/4 ton is your friend, but my truck lets me do stuff others can’t, once I get to my location. Try it for a year and decide then. Might be able to actually buy a new truck by then.
    4 points
  38. We have a 105# male black lab. He stays outside as much as he can tethered on a long lead to the sturdy stairs. Sleeps on the floor between the twin beds on a washable dog rug, he’s snoring there now. We reach down and pet him before we get out of bed to let him know we are not going to step on him. I blocked off the aft furnace outlet vent so it wouldn’t scorch him when it’s running. We have to sweep or vacuum daily with a mini Shark vac. Water bowl is in the shower much of the time so the slop over is manageable. We spend a lot of time looking for swimming holes.
    4 points
  39. The E. Coli is stored in the black tank. Definitely avoid drinking from that.
    4 points
  40. If you live near even a small town (8,000 people) there is probably a sheet metal shop near you. Simply take measurements, make a rough drawing of what you want and take it to them. You don't need "handy", you don't need talent and you don't need equipment - all you need is money. 😃 Bill
    4 points
  41. Thank you all. I just found the water spigot. Thanks. George and Gretchen thanks for the thoughts and the chance to look at your real Oliver up close. That seems long ago. So far everything has been just Grand. Tina and Mike
    4 points
  42. Hi All RE: Boston area travel tips As someone that has lived in downtown Boston and surrounding suburbia since 1985. Here are some travel tips: 1. Peak traffic. Starts 3pm-7pm 2. Avoid Fri. Sat, Sun. 3. What's new? Thu is the new Fri. Often worse Thu 3pm-7pm May-Sep 4. Tech. Use GPS to plot alternate routes. Example Rt 495 5. Example: Take Rt 95 around the city instead Rt 93 thru the city 6. Solution: Travel off peak and you will increase your probability of free passage 7. Tech. Get a free EZ Pass transponder if you are a regular 8. Beaches=density. That's Cranes in Ipswich going north Rt 95 and Duxbury on Rt 3 going south 9. Rain=Add an hour 10. Caveat Emptor: Despite what the bumper stickers say..."There is no Cape Cod Tunnel". Add: 2 hours May-Sep during Fri, Sat, Sun. 11.Local Tip: go off peak 5-6am and 8-9pm and you may sail thru. That's what we do. 12. Consider: White Lake in Tamworth NH. Burlingame in Charlestown RI Ping me if I can help in any way
    4 points
  43. HH Desert Lakes Golf Course in Alamogordo, NM. Nice spot in corner of parking lot overlooking the 18th hole at sunset. We had breakfast at the clubhouse the next morning before heading out.
    4 points
  44. I did get to know about the secret handshake, and got to practice it. What I didn't do is tell anybody about it. Now you have told the world! May the secret die in peace...
    4 points
  45. MrLynn, I bought a used 2017 LE2 in January 2018 with the standard bed configuration. It did not work for us and we quickly started leaving the big table behind. We experimented with sleeping arrangements and I found that sleeping across the back bench worked best for me, but I am 6'. I spoke Oliver service, made an appointment and they converted it over the twin bed configuration at a cost of around $2000 with the night stand, electrical AC outlets and DC circuit with USB and 12v outlets. I certainly could have completed this project myself if I had thought of it and when I read AndrewK's post about completing this mod, it was a "duh" moment, like why didn’t I think of that. So I say go for it, if you can find one that you like. But I do believe your chances are better in finding a twin bed than a standard these days as they are much more popular. Mossey
    4 points
  46. This is the best forum that I have ever the pleasure of being a member of! Great people, excellent advice!!!
    4 points
  47. It would depend on what you're looking for, i.e. dispersed, hookups, private, etc. I lean towards no hook ups. Also, the timing of your trip. Many USFS campsites, my favorites, close for the season that time of year, so do your homework. One of my "easy favorites" is Cochiti Lake Campground run by the Corp of Engineers about an hour north of Albuquerque. Used to be open year 'round with some hookups; great showers! Quiet, easy, scenic. But, recent restrictions have made it a bit unpredictable; investigate. Loma Linda Campground, just south of Jemez Springs, NM, an hour north of ABQ, I believe is open year around. Hot springs close. First Come First Served. Joe Skeen CG west of ABQ, at the south end of El Malpias Lava Flow is open year 'round. That's about an hour west below Grants, NM. Very cool scenery. There are KOA's, Casino Campgrounds i.e Isleta, Sandia, Rt. 66, Santa Anna, if you prefer that form of camping/parking. I have never stayed at any of those, but they are close. One surprising unit is Coranado State Park in the town of Bernalillo, NM nothing fancy, but they do have hookups, State Park, relatively quiet, and only 15 mins. north of ABQ. usually packed for Balloon Fiesta. Open year 'round and conveninet. Lot to see in NM. All the best, E
    4 points
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