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  1. Just a quick follow up to let everyone know both Cyndi and I continue to do well with no hidden injuries from our rollover accident. In addition, we were successful in finding and purchasing a 2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II this past week and have just now returned to our home location after successfully making some of our originally planned stops from our interrupted vacation on Apr 2nd. It is truly amazing we were uninjured in the accident and able to get back on our feet with truck and trailer within the remaining two weeks of our scheduled vacation. Thanks again for all the support the Oliver community has given us these past few weeks. This alone should convince anyone on the fence about purchasing the best built travel trailer on the market. Mark and Cyndi
    23 points
  2. An hour ago, we gained member number 7,000! Welcome to the board, @SusanJ. And thank you, to all the folks here who make this forum such a great place to learn and share.
    14 points
  3. Returned a few weeks ago from a trip into Utah again, this time hitting a few places that have been on my bucket list for years. Weather was not ideal but we made the best of it, great hikes and adventures with some photos. Thanks for looking. Boondocking in the San Rafael Reef Formation known as the Temple Mount, San Rafael Reef View looking southwest to the Henry Mountains and San Rafael Swell & Reef Trudi peeking out of Oliver Hike in Wild Horse Canyon, San Rafael Reef Head of Sinbad Pictograph panel, San Rafael Swell Another view of the same panel above San Rafael Reef canyon wall, land of the tortured stone More tortured stone from San Rafael The textures in some of these rock walls is amazing from centuries of weathered torture 😂 via hike in the Little Horse Canyon More rock walls from Little Horse Canyon Trudi hiking through the slot canyon section of Little Horse Canyon More slot canyon views from Little Horse Canyon A geologist dream scape I suppose, most slot canyon of the Little Horse The Rochester Panel Detail from the Rochester Panel
    13 points
  4. Early season at the City of Rocks, Idaho, elev. ~6,200 feet. Superb hiking.
    13 points
  5. Today was the day I got to do the fun messy job of replacing the China Bomb wheel bearings/seals on the ILOVHER on over to USA made Timkens. This was quite the all day project as we also changed out the shocks and lubed the EZ Flex suspension. We beat the rain by a mere ten minutes! My only experience prior to this, was replacing entire preloaded hubs and manual brakes on my Casita which was easy compared to this. After figuring out the best way to jack the side of the trailer up. (Yes, we used multiple floor jacks, and safety jacks stands, chocks and wood cribbing all while being attached to my truck) All I can say is, Thank God my son was here to teach me and to remove the seals in those hubs! (His father owns an excavating company so he knows a bit about trailers/brakes) There is no way on Gods green earth I would have been able to remove them by myself. We had a puller and they would not budge. I think they were permatex'd in there. He somehow was able to use his strength, ingenuity and multiple tools to get them out without scoring. Here are some observations and or questions we had: 1. My son thinks that the shocks look too large for the application. We used the exact replacement that Oliver uses (Monroe 555025) He says they're nearly all the way compressed with the way the suspension sits and that is why potentially two of them were blown. His opinion is that they'd do more if they were just a bit smaller. I have no idea or opinion but it was the one job I was able to complete by myself so I'm good with it. 2. It was quite the surprise to see that the axle spindle did not have the Dexter EZ lube feature. My understanding is that this was not an option on an LE2 in 2017? I did not know this and bought new grease caps with the rubber insert. As much as I learned today, this was sort of disconcerting. Even my Casita had EZ lube axle and it was a 2007. I greased my bearings every year and it made it easy. All those great suspension features like shocks and a EZ Flex but no way to easily grease bearings?? What gives? I sort of dread doing this again. 3. What's with grease guns? OMG..I wanted to throw and shoot them with a real rifle like skeet. I used two separate guns and they both were being unruly and messy. I could have bought stock today in rubber gloves and shop towels! LOL 4. Bearing grease packer seemed like a great idea. Who knew you'd have to use all 200# of human body weight to press down in order for the thing to squeeze grease into the bearings? 4. I took the advice on the forum and replaced a few zerks with 90s and 45s and used plastic cap covers but OMG.. crawling under the trailer is not for the faint of heart or my elderly bones! I think I want/need a creeper. 5. Thank God for Harbor Freight! I now have all kinds of fun new cheap tools, like impact driver and a torque wrench which I properly learned how to use! I now can afford to go to the Rally. 6. The Nev-r-Adjust Brakes looked good but I think I'm going to go with manual brakes next time. I don't feel confident about what I learned about them today and how they actually DO need adjustment. We greased the important parts with a good brake grease. At least we didn't find any loose parts. springs or worn pads floating about. 7. Found four cracked lug nuts. Son says the sheath on the outside is cracked and I should consider solid replacements. Any recommendations? 8. Beer never tasted so good. Thank you for all of the forum help I've received, without you guys, I'd be dead in the water. See y'all safely at the Rally !
    11 points
  6. We are empty nesters, Deb and Rod (aka Wink) from Lancaster, PA, who thought our camping days were over when we sold our pop-up camper and eventually invested in a fixer-upper vacation home in NC years ago. And then along came COVID (just as we were approaching retirement and planning to travel), which prompted us to reconsider our options and research campers at the beginning of 2021. We stumbled on the Oliver TT website fairly quickly, but what really got our attention when comparing camper features was the Walkthrough Tour Video on the Oliver TT website. After a visit to see an Oliver (Hull #247) in our area and a factory tour in Hohenwald, we placed our order for an Elite II in March 2021 and requested a delivery date for April 2022, when we would both be retired. After over a year of waiting, we pick up "Captain Ollie" (long story) in TWO days! Shout-out to everyone at Oliver who guided us through this process and especially all of the Forum members who contribute such valuable information on a daily basis. While we have learned so much from the experiences of others, we also recognize there will be challenges and much more to learn along the way. We are super excited about the adventures that await and look forward to seeing/meeting you all at the 2022 Rally! Many, many thanks! wink-n-deb
    10 points
  7. At last, we have taken delivery of #1071. Watson, the three-legged wonder dog, tagged along for the big adventure. After a night at the Oliver camp grounds, we made our way to Fall Creek Falls State park for a couple of days, then back to home in Atlanta. As total newbies, we're still amazed that we didn't blow up our rig. The best part was pulling the Ollie up our driveway without dragging the concrete.
    10 points
  8. I don’t even know when Airxcel (makers of the Maxxair Window/Maxx Louvered Window Vent) stopped production (maybe 2015) but I was one of the lucky ones who purchased a couple from Little House Customs for use on my Casita. Right before putting OCD for sale, I removed them for use on the ILOVHER. I consider myself lucky as there are still current threads about owners with radius style sliding windows who want the ability to open the windows in the rain for that much needed airflow. The company apparently doesn’t see the need to start production and maybe our fiberglass market is just too small to justify a rebirth. Occasionally, I’ll see a couple pop up on Ebay but they go for a mint..sometimes upwards of $150 plus shipping! I have followed the topic with interest because one of my vents is spider cracking..probably from UV exposure and vibration over ten years. It’s still hanging in there with a bit of FlexSeal tape! I stumbled across a gentleman on Fiberglassrv who was 3D printing a drop-in two piece vent in three colors and sent me info on his prototype. Here is the link to the discussion and a picture of his 3D design: https://bit.ly/3JNotT5 I was emailing him back and forth in September of 2020 but my understanding is that he’s dropped off the planet. He was charging right around $80 for one. I’m not sure how many people were able to purchase one but I never did. I decided to put my mod brain to work and came up with the design below. I will eventually make another one for the curbside. I really enjoyed the process and it wasn’t terribly expensive to do! (about $50) in materials. PM me if you’re interested in the material list.. The vent is made out of a black boat louvered ventilator. I got the idea from a friend who had something similar on the hood of his ATV. I used a piece of ⅛” smoked plexiglass and the window screen as a template. The plexi was cut with a standard Dremel tool cutting wheel. The edges were trimmed with rubber edge trim and the vent is seated with a waterproof nanotape. The only downside is having to install the vent when it’s raining outside and removing it before travel…that’s where the Maxxair vent had the edge! You simply slide the whole thing upwards into the upper track and it fits snug and water-tight. The other bonus was that I didn’t have to add screening as the current screen still closes with it in place. This was really fun to do and I’m super stoked to test it out!
    10 points
  9. Let me preface this story by making it clear that I am NOT a hunter but I do now understand why we SHOOT deer in the wild... I never liked the taste of venison, too gamey or too wild or too something. So, I had this idea ...that I could rope a deer, put it in a stall, feed it up on corn for a couple of weeks, then kill it and eat it. The first step in this adventure was getting a deer. I figured that, since they congregate at my cattle feeder and do not seem to have much fear of me when we are there (a bold one will sometimes come right up and sniff at the bags of feed while I am in the back of the truck not 4 feet away), it should not be difficult to rope one, get up to it and toss a bag over its head (to calm it down) then hog tie it and transport it home. I filled the cattle feeder then hid down at the end with my rope. The cattle, having seen the roping thing before, stayed well back. They were not having any of it. After about 20 minutes, my deer showed up-- 3 of them. I picked out a likely looking one, stepped out from the end of the feeder, and threw my rope. The deer just stood there and stared at me. I wrapped the rope around my waist and twisted the end so I would have a good hold. The deer still just stood and stared at me, but you could tell it was mildly concerned about the whole rope situation. I took a step towards it, it took a step away. I put a little tension on the rope, and then received an education. The first thing that I learned is that, while a deer may just stand there looking at you funny while you rope it, they are spurred to action when you start pulling on that rope. That deer EXPLODED. The second thing I learned is that pound for pound, a deer is a LOT stronger than a cow or a colt. A cow or a colt in that weight range I could fight down with a rope and with some dignity. A deer-- NO Chance. That thing ran and bucked and twisted and pulled. There was no controlling it and certainly no getting close to it. As it jerked me off my feet and started dragging me across the ground, it occurred to me that having a deer on a rope was not nearly as good an idea as I had originally imagined. The only upside is that they do not have as much stamina as many other animals. A brief 10 minutes later, it was tired and not nearly as quick to jerk me off my feet and drag me when I managed to get up. It took me a few minutes to realize this, since I was mostly blinded by the blood flowing out of the big gash in my head. At that point, I had lost my taste for corn-fed venison. I just wanted to get that devil creature off the end of that rope. At the time, there was no love at all between me and that deer, but I figured if I just let it go with the rope hanging around its neck, it would likely die slow and painfully somewhere. At that moment, I hated the thing, and I would venture a guess that the feeling was mutual. Despite the gash in my head and the several large knots where I had cleverly arrested the deer's momentum by bracing my head against various large rocks as it dragged me across the ground, I could still think clearly enough to recognize that there was a small chance that I shared some tiny amount of responsibility for the situation we were in. I didn't want the deer to have to suffer a slow death, so I managed to get it lined back up in between my truck and the feeder - a little trap I had set before hand...kind of like a squeeze chute. I got it to back in there and I started moving up so I could get my rope back. Did you know that deer bite? They do! I never in a million years would have thought that a deer would bite somebody, so I was very surprised when ..... I reached up there to grab that rope and the deer grabbed hold of my wrist. Now, when a deer bites you, it is not like being bit by a horse where they just bite you and slide off to then let go. A deer bites you and shakes its head--almost like a pit bull. They bite HARD and it hurts. The proper thing to do when a deer bites you is probably to freeze and draw back slowly. I tried screaming and shaking instead. My method was ineffective. It seems like the deer was biting and shaking for several minutes, but it was likely only several seconds. I, being smarter than a deer (though you may be questioning that claim by now), tricked it. While I kept it busy tearing the tendons out of my right arm, I reached up with my left hand and pulled that rope loose. That was when I got my final lesson in deer behavior for the day. Deer will strike at you with their front feet. They rear right up on their back feet and strike right about head and shoulder level, and their hooves are surprisingly sharp... I learned a long time ago that, when an animal -like a horse --strikes at you with their hooves and you can't get away easily, the best thing to do is try to make a loud noise and make an aggressive move towards the animal. This will usually cause them to back down a bit so you can escape. This was not a horse. This was a deer, so obviously, such trickery would not work. In the course of a millisecond, I devised a different strategy. I screamed like a woman and tried to turn and run. The reason I had always been told NOT to try to turn and run from a horse that paws at you is that there is a good chance that it will hit you in the back of the head. Deer may not be so different from horses after all, besides being twice as strong and 3 times as evil, because the second I turned to run, it hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me down. Now, when a deer paws at you and knocks you down, it does not immediately leave. I suspect it does not recognize that the danger has passed. What they do instead is paw your back and jump up and down on you while you are laying there crying like a little girl and covering your head. I finally managed to crawl under the truck and the deer went away. So now I know why when people go deer hunting they bring a rifle with a scope......to sort of even the odds!! All these events are true, so help me God...An Educated Farmer
    9 points
  10. 2021 E2 King Bed 26" covers the width of the hall perfectly, does not rise up the sides but keeps dirt out of the side. 9' covers from the bathroom to just under the bed perfectly. we ordered another 2' section for the entryway. That overlaps the hallway carpet about 2". https://www.amazon.com/stores/ORFA+HOME/page/3F7EE630-F809-4166-A6EC-D683ED706BB7?ref_=ast_bln
    9 points
  11. Adding a few more from the trip mostly from Nine Mile Canyon in the Book Cliffs area. Stayed a couple of nights at the Nine Mile Ranch which is around 7,000 feet elevation and were told we were the first campers as they had just opened for the season. They do have cabins and bed & breakfast facilities here. Very nice people, seems to be well run but you wouldn't mistake it for a 5 Star facility, considerably more rustic than that. No cell service in here and it is NOT nine miles long, nor 9 miles from anything. No idea where the name came from. All BLM land interspersed with private ranch land and very undeveloped. There are no other camping facilities throughout the canyon and apparently pull off camping is discouraged however there are some gravel roads that intersect from the paved canyon road where boodocking is a possibility. The canyon road itself is smooth as a baby's butt, but go slow there are numerous large dips due to flash floods from adjoining creeks should anyone decide to go in here. Nine Mile Ranch camground View of the Nine Mile Canyon looking west Ancient Freemont Culture Village Petroglyph Detail of Book Cliffs geology and rock formations The Big Hunt The Big Bison petroglyph pictograph Larger view of pictograph above with more recent cowboy inclusions Known as the Owl petroglyph Wild Horse Canyon view Large group site in the San Rafael Reef area, not recommended during the weekends. Note the only facility are a few picnic tables and pit toilets. NO WATER anywhere within miles. Bring your own. Black Dragon Canyon Large Pictograph in Black Dragon Canyon Detail from above Another detail Little Horse Canyon in the slot Another long view of the Blue Mountains and San Rafael Swell
    9 points
  12. Delivery Day went great yesterday! Kudos to Ryan for a thorough orientation that enabled us to learn, have fun, and ask endless questions before choosing our spot on the Oliver Campground. It's been so much fun meeting other owners and learning from their experiences during our stay here so far. We were also blessed with beautiful weather on pick-up day and a quiet peaceful evening for our first night stay. Today, we are enjoying another sunny and warm day in the 70's before we head home tomorrow for PA, where it's currently in the 40's according to family members. Oh well. We eagerly look forward to seeing you all at the Oliver Rally, which is quickly approaching. Peace, love, & safe travels!
    9 points
  13. New Catalog. New Products. I have wanted to update my catalog for a few months and today is the day. I have three new products that I am very excited to show you. LINK TO PDF CATALOG First, up are my 7-piece Grain-Matched Drawer Front set. Whether on their own or combined with my wood countertops, they make a beautiful statement and are a distinguished upgrade for your trailer. Available in board match walnut or mahogany – meaning one board from left to right so all the wood grain lines up and matches across each drawer. Next, is my Bath Doorstep. Stepping into the Oliver bathroom can be a challenge for some of us. A normal step is 7” high yet, Oliver's step is 9.25” high. Added to this awkward height is that you must step down into the shower pan once your foot clears the opening. If you need a little help with this, my Bath Doorstep is a great option. And far from last, our 3-piece Acoustic Design Panel set creates a decorative opportunity that also reduces the reverberation and echoes in your Oliver. This improves the sound of your television/stereo and plain conversations, with the added benefit of making the ceiling all your own. Attached to the ceiling with Velcro. Change your décor, change your fabric. One Payment Note: I will no longer be using PayPal for payments. Their rates have gotten too high for the value they are providing in my opinion. Going forward I will accept Checks and Zella. If you have an order in process before today, you are grandfathered in to use PayPal.
    9 points
  14. We continued our meander across Texas today for another one night stand just outside of Texarkana. We’re at Piney Point COE campground on Wright Patman lake. We’ve camped at this lake several times before at Clear Springs COE campground not too far from here (see page 9 of this thread). I’d say Clear Springs COE is a bit nicer and is much larger. It has a lot FHU sites if that’s what you need. This campground is smaller. Lots of tall pine trees, not like Texas Hill Country at all.
    8 points
  15. We are meandering our way across Texas on the way to Alabama and the rally. We stopped this afternoon at Liberty Hill COE campground on Navarro Lake in between Waco and Corsicana. It looks like an older park, with some nice sites by the lake and some average looking sites in a couple of loops away from the lake. There are three other COE campgrounds on the lake, we can see all three across the lake from our site. I might try another one of the campgrounds if we come back through this way.
    8 points
  16. NPS put this out on social media, in a humorous attempt to make more people aware of the dangers. Every year, we see reports of folks trying to interact or take selfies with wildlife, with disastrous and sometimes fatal results . None of us, I'm sure.
    8 points
  17. I took delivery at the end of March and slowly made my way back to the Florida swamp. At the factory campground I was thankful to have some wonderful guidance and help from veteran owners who were there for service visits, and some of us met up again at other campgrounds in Tennessee. There were a few hiccups (yet to be addressed) and I'm still learning that I have a lot to learn about the systems, but it's all good. I really love my Oliver and I'm thrilled to begin new adventures. The rally is just around the corner!
    8 points
  18. There are a bunch of "pro's and con's" concerning the EZ Lube feature. Bottom line is - yes - there is no easy way to properly grease bearings and that certainly includes the EZ Lube. Once you know how to do the job - it really isn't very difficult. BUT - it is always very messy! One can grease those zerks without jacking up the camper at all - at least if one is your size 😇. It is a little tight and you have to learn to move like a snake, but, knowing that the camper isn't going to fall on you helps a bunch with the "peace of mind". No easy way of getting the grease COMPLETELY in and around all of those little bearings. I still use the tried and true hand packing method. Once you get past the idea of how long its going to take to get your hands degreased, its not so bad. Besides, for the next day or so your hands will be soooooo soft and smooth (assuming that you're not wearing gloves). Yep! I've always felt that now that you know how these things work and how the job is supposed to be done you are in a much better position to know when and/or if things are not "right" - " the way that they should be". Knowledge is a great thing - it is a shame that sometimes it is so difficult/messy to earn/learn. You should take great pride in the fact that you tackled this job and now "know". In the immortal words of "Ice", "you (Topgun) can be my wingman anytime". Bill
    8 points
  19. We could not be more excited to pick up our Oliver on May 2... hull number 1097. I wanted to say thanks to all of you Oliver Veterans that have helped me get educated on everything we will need to know to be "happy campers". This world is not like our regular house.... it's a rolling unit and we need to know how to maintain it, how to some times trouble shoot problems on the road and make repairs. Most of the time the real secret is just understanding how all the systems work... and I have endured the long wait (10 months) by listening to the advice of of those that take the time to share experiences. I have watched with interest as folks run into problems... and then I wait to see what the community thinks and it's always interesting to see how it was resolved. Thanks so much to all of you for helping me not only get educated... but to be assured that we spent our money wisely. Seldom have I felt so certain of a new purchase as this one! After our pickup, we will be moving around Tennessee and Alabama for a few weeks... just playing with our new Oliver. I feel like I know some of you... at least to a certain level... so we are looking forward to meeting you in person either at the upcoming Rally... or elsewhere on the road!
    8 points
  20. I bought my Oli used at 10 months old (2020 hull# 648). When I got my Oli one of the small Aluminum support bars was missing in the dog house lid. One my first voyage, We lost the other one within the first 40 miles. I noticed I had a bad habit of lying down the access port cover, so I fixed up a 18g wire and hooked to the large support bar and to the back of the access port cover. Just one year as the owner on one of our 5 day outings, I got to the camp site and went to open the access port to turn on the propane; The large bar had fallen off, and was hanging by the wire. I was going to call Oliver to order 2 more small bars, but since I am out in the cold when it comes to Olivers Warranty I decided to make Aluminum Support bars. I had left over 1”x2” Aluminum rectangle left over from mud flap installation (Original rectangle material was 1”x1.5”), and I had a few small pieces of Black 5/8” thick Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMW) lying around. The large bar that I still had only a few very small areas that had the resin attach to it (marked in Red), and the area where the bars came off where real smooth. The surface of the aluminum had a fair amount of oxidation. I cut a couple pieces of aluminum with a Angle grinder cut-off wheel, and the UHMW was cut to size on a table saw. I counter sinked the UHMW with a 3/8 spade drill and drilled out for a 10-24 SS screw. I also tapped the aluminum with a 10-24 tap for attaching the UHMW. I got a little carried away when I attached the UHMW to the aluminum, I used blue lock tight and lock wash and nut on the back side. I was paranoid of the aluminum support bars falling off again, so I go a little carried away with the mating surfaces to be attached. I used a 1/16 angle grinder cut-off wheel and cross hatched the aluminum, I then drilled and tapped 1/4-20 threads into the aluminum. The 1/4-20 holes are NOT for bolts but something extra for what ever I used to adhere to the Aluminum. I also sanded the aluminum by hand with 40 grit sandpaper for metal. For the Fiberglass I sanded down the original area with the 60grit sanding pad on a angle grinder. I left one small portion of an edge for locating the bars side to side. I used a Dremel tool with a carbide bit to cross hatch the fiberglass. Finally I did a final hand sanding with 40grit sandpaper. I made a tool for locating the aluminum support bars from the edge of the of the fiberglass. I took measurement from the impressions in the fiberglass from the resin, and the one Aluminum bar that I had. I calculated the offset of the bar .640” from the edge. This measurement was including the white trim piece. I didn’t realize that the trim would just come right off. If I had to do it over again, I think I would done the measurement without the trim piece. Note the picture shows me holding it without the trim on the shell, but I did not use it that way. Note the wires in the second picture. Before I mounted the bars I made a couple of security straps. I figured that by some chance one of the bars would come off I Attached 16g wire with heavy duty eyelets to each bar. That way I will not loose any more support bar if they cam unglued. The next question was how to adhere the support bars to the fiberglass. I felt that my 2 low tech options were JB weld or Gorilla glue. I research both, and both seemed to be a reasonable option for adhering aluminum to fiberglass. I have used Gorilla glue a few times and never had any problems with it besides the bottle has a short life span in Oregons high humidity after it is opened. The JB Weld had a fractionally higher shear factor than the Gorilla glue did, and I have use JB weld in so many applications and it has never failed. I flipped a coin and JB Weld won, although it might have been a 2 headed coin. I ended up using 1 package of the Professional size JB Weld, and one of the regular size. to do the job. I used a Bondo plastic putty tool to spread the JB weld. I put a small amount on the fiberglass just enough to fill the cross hatching squeegeed across the fiberglass. Then I put a large amount on the Aluminum cross hatching. Put the Aluminum bar in placed and then clamped. Note the trim piece in place. Below is of one of the bar ends. The puddle of JB Weld on the inside of the bar is what pushed up through the 1/4-20 holes. Here are the tools I used for the JB weld. The 3M adhesive remover worked great for cleaning up the JB Weld (sometimes I can make a mess). The final Product. I secured the wires with GB 1” square adhesive back wire tie downs to keep the wires out of the way.
    7 points
  21. Sneak Preview Here are a few pictures of the new rooftop tracker. It has a smaller height profile than the AC It tracks dawn to dusk automatically resulting in MUCH more energy to your batteries The tracker detects high wind and Tow movement, shuts down and locks Existing Oliver solar panels can be retrofitted with a rooftop tracker. Built and installed by Oliver “Clean setting” lifts the panels high so they can be cleaned with a squeegee while standing on the ground - NO LADDERS ! 2 photos below. Sign up on list during the rally , no financial obligation, and get 3 year electronic warranty - FREE ! Video and more information coming soon Coy Questions ?
    7 points
  22. This is stellar service, kind of like the Oliver company. Note the time of the email. It was 7:18 AM (their time) when this got processed. And I only asked for one.😳 John Davies Spokane WA
    7 points
  23. I want to tell you about a number of ways you can use the Apple Notes App for travel. The Apple Notes App is free. One of the nice things about Notes is that it uses iCloud to seamlessly sync between an iPhone, an iPad, and a Mac. I typically use the Mac to copy/paste information into the file but then use the notes on my other devices. (I am more comfortable with the laptop keyboard than the phone.) Importantly, you can share a note with your partner. This is particularly useful if I am driving; I can ask my wife to open her notes app and find some info or dial a phone number listed there. What is it useful for? I will start with a simple example. I have a Note called Current Trip. If it is a camping trip I will list each of our campsites in chronological order. For each campground, I copy/paste the Address, Phone Number, Website, etc, into the Note. For non-camping trips, I put in hotel or Airbnb information. If I book a restaurant, I put the info into the Notes file. Ditto for Car Rental information. The Address, Phone Number, and Website in the Notes file become links. If I touch the Address on my phone, it opens up the Address in the Maps app, and I can now click on directions. If I click on the Phone Number it offers to dial the number. If I click on the Website it opens in a web browser. These links can be incredibly useful. Again, having the notes file shared with your spouse or other traveling companions means they can access this info. This Notes File can be wonderful for Wi-Fi Passwords. Suppose you check into a place and they give an awful random character password, such as t?Uc'C&Ds9Ye;v. Now you have to enter this into each of your devices, under conditions where what you have already typed is obscured! Instead, I enter the password into my Current Trip file and verify that I typed it correctly. I can then copy the password, go to Settings > Wi-Fi, select the network, and paste in the complex password. Since my Current Trip file syncs with my wife’s devices, I can copy the password from her Notes and get her Wi-Fi set up. You can put nearly anything into a Notes file, including images (jpg, heic, png, tif, or pdf). On our trip to Zion NP last month, I pasted maps for the Zion Park shuttle system and the campground map. I have also pasted driving directions for the trailhead for a hike into the Notes file, or the mile makers for Rest Areas along the route. Another Notes file I use is called Travel Plans, and this I also share with my wife. It helps us both know what upcoming trips we had or when visitors were expected. I started this in 2018, when we had a lot of travel planned. I discovered that this Travel Plans file turned out to be very useful for examining our travels retrospectively. I found it so useful that I used my photo files to add dates and destinations for all of our past foreign trips. Another Notes file is called Ollie. I started this file soon after we started camping with Ollie. We pull into a commercial campground and walk into the office to register, and the first thing they want is the vehicle license plate number. So I put this info in the Ollie file. When we first started camping with Ollie, I had to look up in the Owner’s Manual which water inlet I wanted to use, Fresh Water Connection vs City Water Connection, so I put that in the Ollie file. Height to the top of Ollie, tire pressure and torque info, details on the Solar controller or the WiFi Ranger. We like to make pancakes when camping, and we heat up the real maple syrup in the microwave. If we heat at full power the syrup boils, so we needed to use a lower cooking level. After looking up how to do this several times in the instruction manual, I decided to put the info into the Notes Ollie file. (Note, our microwave is a Summit OTR24, and yours may be different. Basically, anything I had to lookup more than once went into the Notes Ollie file. I also put pictures into the Notes Ollie file. I use a milk crate to store my chocks and wooden blocks. I had worked out a nice way to fit them all in neatly, but then at the next stop, I couldn’t remember. So once I figured it out, I took sequential pictures of the packing steps and put them into the Notes Ollie file. I posted about how we lock our bikes on the rack on the back of the trailer, using a 6-foot heavy-duty chain that just barely fits. A picture of the bike lock on the bike rack that is stored in the Notes Ollie file helps me remember the strategy for attaching the lock and chain. The last Notes file I want to mention is the After camping list. While on a camping trip I think of things I want to repair or want to research/purchase to make camping more enjoyable. I always have my phone with me, so I can add to this list while barbequing. I recommend all Ollie owners use a file like this. A couple of final points about the Notes app. Pin. The default is to sort by Date Edited (which can be changed), but sometimes the Note you use the most has not been edited in a while and is far down the list. In that case, you can Pin the most important Notes to the top of the list. Folders. If you have a lot of Notes, you can put them into Folders, so that you can look in a particular folder. I have a number of folders, including Computer & Phone, Cooking, Medical, Ollie, Photography, Travel, and TV & Movies. Icons. If you have a lot of Notes, a picture or an icon can make it easier to find the Note you want. When I first started pasting photos into Notes files, I discovered that the photo would be visible in the list of notes. If there are multiple photos, only the first one appears in the list. I later decided to search for icons to mark Notes files. Suitcase icon for Travel, trailer icon for Ollie, etc. If I have pictures in the Note, then I put the Icon image earlier in the Note. These icon images can be tiff, png, jpg or heic files. While you can put pdf files into notes, the pdf images do not appear in the list of Notes files. Perhaps a PC / Android phone user can provide info about similar apps for the PC and android devices? I did find an article explaining how iPhone owners can edit their Notes on Windows.
    7 points
  24. I have a Champion 2,000W. It weighs 38 pounds. It runs my AC. Mike
    7 points
  25. Success, I got the new microwave in. 😃 I replaced the High Point one with a Toshiba EM925A5A-BS That was a lot cheaper than High point. It is the same size and wattage and I was able to use the existing trim, screws etc. from the Non functioning High point.
    7 points
  26. We camped at COE Obey River Campground on Dale Hollow Lake TN. Nice campground for those that like bicycling, boating, fishing, and Kayaking.
    7 points
  27. That is not a prudent method! Two things come to mind. A compete drum with bearing will be REALLY heavy and awkward to store. If you have a big truck bed, that may not matter. A brand new drum will NOT work correctly on worn brake shoes, the diameters are different. This is why you always replace brakes in pairs, on the same axle. The situation where this would work great is if you have disk brakes with slip on rotors, like on your car. Then you could carry a complete hub and bearing and it wouldn't matter because you would be installing the old rotor onto the new hub and everything will match nicely, in terms or wear. Just get the bearing assembly, any decent shop in any little town can easily replace it. John Davies Spokane WA
    7 points
  28. When I repacked my 2021 E2 bearings (hull #709), I found a heaping amount of grease still intact in the bearings/races and also a fair amount in the space between then, fwiw. Doesn't mean there wasn't a systemic issue that may have effected other units, but FTR I didn't see it on our trailer. As an aside this strikes me as a job that I'd be more than happy to pay a reasonsable fee to have someone else do for me in the future (not my idea of a fun day, and I don't think I'll ever get super efficient given how infrequently I'd ever be doing it), but I wanted to learn how this stuff all fits together and how to do this myself in case I find myself needing to replace bearings on the road (I didn't replace the cones/cups this time but I thin I'm pretty clear on how to deal with that part of the job and have the relevant tools along with spares for the travel kit).
    7 points
  29. Another beautiful evening in WNC meant another simple meal on the fire. 🔥 Just burgers and slaw. Watched a cardinal flitting around. Now that it's getting darker, we'll watch for fireflies. So peaceful.
    7 points
  30. 1300 miles later and we arrived to a spot most of you will recognize. David Crockett State Park. Heading to Hohenwald for service tomorrow and will stay at the campground at the Sales Office. Trip was uneventful, here are my observations towing with the diesel vs. Tundra: 1) MPG - 16 total trip. As high as 16.4 in Kansas with a side wind. Even with the higher cost of diesel, I figured I saved about $15 in the cost of fuel on this trip. If You had to buy DEF it would be less. 2) Ride - a bit stiffer than the Tundra but not bad. Zero jounce as could be expected 3) Braking- much better with the Dodge but not for the reason I expected. The aftermarket brake controller I had installed in the Dodge worked far better than the integrated unit that came in the Tundra. Much better adjustability and much more power. I could never get the trailer brakes to lock up with the controller in the Tundra but it was easy with the aftermarket controller. Tundra forums cover this issue if anyone is interested. I will be ordering a aftermarket controller for the Tundra when I return home. 4) Transmission - towing with a stick is great. Made me wish that Toyota offered a 6 spd manual. Oh well. 5) overall - The Dodge is way more truck than I need for towing the Elite II. While a fun experiment, the Tundra will get put back in place soon as the Dedicated TV for the Ollie. The Dodge will go back to towing the car hauler. I can see where if you were hauling a lot of gear in the bed the 1 ton ( or a 3/4 ton) would make a lot of sense or if you towed a lot in the mountains a diesel would make sense or if the cost of diesel ever comes down it would make sense for the fuel economy but since the Tundra can’t tow the car hauler and Dodge no longer makes diesel trucks with manual transmissions, its back to the Tundra for towing the Ollie. Oh, and we stumbled across the worlds largest ball of sisal twine in Kansas. Clark Griswald was nowhere to be found.
    7 points
  31. I was asked to instruct an informal demonstration on repairing any plumbing issues. I will be bringing some pex tubing and tools used to fix a broken tube or fitting. This will be a hands-on session and anyone who wants to try their hand at it will be welcome to do so. I also plan to demo the proper way to remove and lubricate the cable that controls the black tank sliding gate valve.
    7 points
  32. GSDK9Dad... I hear you on some of those concerns. I was looking at many different models... in the campgrounds passed thru. I was always looking at the pros/cons of each model... even toy haulers. I KNEW we required a quality unit and I was looking at AS because they are built near my home and many of my friends spent their careers with them. The wet shower is a concern for me (I'm a shower taker). Many went into Olivers with at least some concern on shower size. Most have since decided it now is non-issue. We are travelers... not so much campers. We want mobile comfort but don't need a rolling house. One of the attractions (for me) of Oliver is it's reputation for towing. Virtually no one with experience will dispute that point. I had to reign myself in when looking at RV's. What did I really need to be comfortable in while traveling? There are bigger units... and personally I fell in love with some of the AS floor plans. The very first time I saw a trailer with two twin beds in it was a vintage AS... probably around 1955 model. I never forgot that. The LEII allows me to chill, read a book in bed... watch a bit of tv... go to bed, wake up and have a cup of coffee at at the table while my wife sleeps in later. I can go to bathroom, shower and step out to greet the world when I'm good and ready. It's enough. Cooking for most part is a combination of stove top, microwave and grill outside. I quote someone else that said "Ollie is everything I need and nothing more". Ultimately cost has to be calculated. What is a reasonable long term resale value?? Because $90K and fuel costs will buy a lot of hotel rooms! So then when we toured the factory at Hohenwald and decided to spend this kind of money... I had to give AS one more look while Oliver was fresh in my mind. I still liked the floor plan.... but the quality of an AS was beyond disappointing to me. On many levels... AND it was about $30k MORE... for roughly the same length and one foot wider. This may be a unique point in time... but the re-sale value of Olivers is pretty incredible. Ultimately... the cost of any unit is just the difference between purchase and resale... and whatever maintenance cost in between. That's what you paid to travel around. On after the sale service: I'm in Ohio... so Hohenwald isn't exactly close... but their service has proven to be stellar. I learned the hard way before that the "warrantee and service" that you might think is similar to owning a new Honda... it's NOT that way in the RV world in general. Not even close. I expect to educate myself enough to manage 90% of my own service and maintenance on the Oliver. When I can't... I'm confident the factory will be there for me. In two days we are leaving to pick up our new LEII... and we will be doing a shake down trip and then hanging out with others at the Rally. That was really nice of Oliver to schedule a get together just for us so we could meet everyone! 🙂
    7 points
  33. Prediction: the diesel will feel like there's no trailer back there at all. You'll have to be careful when you hitch up or you'll be 2 hours away before you realize the trailer isn't behind you. 😁
    7 points
  34. Seeing one that "lives" in Garden Valley, Idaho convinced us to place our order. According to our Oliver salesperson, there are several Olivers owned by Idaho residents, in addition to the one in Garden Valley (where we live). There are a couple in the Boise, Nampa area. And, I know of at least one at lot closer to Moscow, in Spokane. There is no substitute for seeing, touching and walking through one. I recommend you coordinate with your Oliver salesperson, and make the trip. But, promise me you won't sue the owner if you take a fall! Oliver doesn't "backstop" owners who show their Olivers in the rare, but possible, event of an injury during the showing. This was discussed in an earlier thread on this forum, causing some to opt out of the "show your Oliver" program. Just be careful, and make the decision that you will return the courtesy of showing you the trailer by taking responsibility for your own safety.
    7 points
  35. coon creek cove coe park just outside ponca city ok... spring is happening here...windy too!! headed for the black kettle national grasslands and practice some bookdocking.!?
    7 points
  36. Eyebrow For Bathroom Window Well to finish off this project short of the testing, I had to design a eyebrow for the bathroom window. Since this window frame is mounted vertical it required a different approach. I thought it might interest some of the readers to see some pictures of the machining processes. Also I changed the finish on the mounts for all the eyebrows to a polished finish, I think its a better look.
    7 points
  37. Bill, I am very happy with these “Rock Stoppers” they are made by Livelymachine.com and are designed Super Duty specific. I don’t know if they fabricate Rock Stoppers for other trucks. I can report they work excellent and protect the front of our Ollie and keep it clean. If anyone has questions PM me.
    7 points
  38. The Dexter video is very helpful. https://youtu.be/GnH-h3W9XvI As mentioned before the complete bearing sets must be replaced, you can’t leave the old races in the hub. And the seal and grease cap must also be replaced. So new bearings, seal and grease cap on each axle. Here’s the tools/etc. that I used for my recent replacement of the bearings on all 4 wheels: Breaker bar & 3/4” lug nut socket for loosening the lug nuts to remove wheel. Screwdriver to pry off old grease cap. You may have either a spring clip or cotter pin as the axle nut retainer. Mine have the spring clip that can be reused. Cotter pins should be replaced. The axle nut should come off by hand since it’s only supposed to be finger tight at final assembly. Seal puller from Harbor Freight to remove old seal. Brass and steel punches to drive out old outer races. Brakleen to remove all old grease from hub and axle spindle, and clean the inside of the brake drum while you’re at it. Also check your brake pad thickness while you have the brake drum off, Dexter says 1/16” minimum thickness for the pads. A bearing driver set to install the new outer races. A good high quality grease to pack the new bearings. A dead blow mallet. A wooden block to install the new seals. A 1-1/2” socket for the axle nut. Torque wrenches for the axle nut and lug nuts. I use two different ones because of the difference in torque settings. The axle nut is to be torqued to 50 ft-lbs. to seat the bearings, then backed off and finger tightened, then install the retainer clip or cotter pin. The lug nuts are 120 ft-lbs. I don’t have one single torque wrench that can cover that range for the axle nuts and the lug nuts, so two torque wrenches in my tool box. Grease cap driver tool to install new grease caps properly. Follow the Dexter video. And I carry all of this with me, including spare bearings, seals and dust caps, in my road tool kit, along with a heavy duty scissor jack, a full ratchet/socket set, small air compressor, and other common hand tools. Flat tires and wheel bearing failures have been common points of failure that leave people stranded. I like to be prepared. Mad Max was the Road Warrior, call me “The Road Worrier” 🙂.
    7 points
  39. Virtually all generators will require the neutral-ground bonding plug.
    6 points
  40. Once you have "filled" the main propane supply line with the method I suggested then there still could be a small amount of air in the relatively short line that goes to the fridge. But, that air will be expelled by the propane without difficulty. Your fridge will ALWAYS use your batteries for ignition of the propane since there is no "standing" pilot light - the fridge and your furnace both use electronic ignitors. Make sure that you are not confusing running your fridge on propane versus trying to run it on DC (straight battery power) The electronic ignitors take very little battery energy BUT when you run the fridge on straight DC they take a bunch of power out of the batteries. Easily - propane is the most efficient and best cooling for these fridges. Bill
    6 points
  41. We'll be picking up our EII in a few weeks. When I was looking for a tow vehicle I was set on the Tacoma for many reasons. It's a very nice truck and being a Toyota means a lot, not least of which is it's the highest rated tow vehicle on consumer reports as far as customer satisfaction and reliability goes. That said, with an Elite 2, the load carrying capacity of the Tacoma is dismal. After accounting for the tongue weight, two adults, dogs, basic travel gear, add a truck cap, and a full tank of fuel, now you have a vehicle that MIGHT be able to carry 100-200 pounds in the bed before you reach capacity. I finally started looking a 3/4 ton vehicles and after much research decided that the least worst vehicle that wasn't the Tundra was the Ford F250 which I bought (2017 model). The advantages are: 1) load capacity of almost 2,800 pounds which means I can have a truck cap on my bed AND carry things in the bed 2) (MOST IMPORTANTLY) Braking capacity. You can tow anything with a small vehicle, the question is, will you be able to make a panic stop while coming down a steep grade in Colorado (where we frequently drive). By maxing out your vehicle's load and towing capacity you risk having precious little wiggle room if you need to stop the rig while coming down a hill. Stopping is the bigger question. Opting for a larger tow vehicle will (generally) decrease your fuel economy and increase your maintenance costs, but it also markedly increases your safety margin. I believe that if you are carrying so much stuff that you need to consider shifting your load to the back of your trailer in order to keep your TV within its limits, then it is reasonable to consider that maybe your TV is undersized for your needs, marginal at best. While towing with an SUV certainly is more comfortable, the newer trucks really ride well. I think a 1-ton is over-kill for an Oliver but at the same time it completely removes the concern of having to do a "weight and balance check" every time you change something in the gear you're carrying to determine if you're within the limits of the tow vehicle...Just toss it in the back and be on your way. The 3/4 ton by-and-large is the same, but at some point I certainly could overload my F250 If I just keep loading stuff in without regard to how much weight I'm adding. I have to be aware, but not like if I had gone with the Tundra. The Tundra would have required a close look every time and then some shifting or possibly leaving stuff behind. The 2022 Tundra's numbers are a bit improved from the previous model years, the problem there is they won't be available when I need it and I also wasn't in the market for the price of a new one. Ideally I'd like a cyber truck, but no telling when they'll become reality. Good luck with your search, I hope to see you on the road. Happy trails!!!! albert
    6 points
  42. I very seldom make posts other than to individuals on the forum but I thought this was worth passing along today. We picked up hull 836 in June of 2021 and we have logged 10,400 miles on her to date. Yesterday I had the wheel bearings re-packed for the first time which I believe is well within the recommended timing for doing so. If I remember correctly the interval for doing this work is one year or 12,000 miles? I was very surprised to find that the bearings were nearly dry of grease. The service location and I could find no visible damage to the bearings or axle shafts but if I had not done this preventive maintenance now I doubt I would have survived a longer trip without finding myself stranded on the side of the road somewhere. I have an obsession while traveling at every stop walking around the trailer and putting my hands on the wheel drums to check if any are warm. Doing this I had consistently found one of the drums to be hotter than all the rest. I had thought that perhaps one of the brake pads had been hanging up a bit so I specifically asked my service folks to check that while they had the wheels off to re-pack the bearings. There was no issue found with the brakes but that particular bearing was the driest of the four and that is likely what was producing the heat. I will probably drop a note to Jason on this at Oliver in case there may be some systemic problem with the Dexter axle supply. Not sure if Oliver packs the bearings or they just come in from Dexter pre-packed. At any rate I would encourage all to get your bearings checked and repacked sooner than later if you were in last summers crop of new trailers. Mike
    6 points
  43. And...for being the 7000th member, you have won a free litter of kittens. Just let us know where to send them.
    6 points
  44. Any wet tank will corrode. Just a matter of time and the rate. My industrial water treatment background taught me that the best way to prevent corrosion in a tank that was not is use is to drain and air dry it. Hence, at the end of the season, with a cold hot water tank, I close off the bypass valve, relieve the pressure at the Temperature/Pressure Relief Valve, remove the anode to drain the tank, and flush the tank with my home made flushing wand. I do not re-install the anode to let the tank air dry. No water, no corrosion, no anode oxidizing away for no purpose. Next season I briefly flush the hot water tank, reinstall the anode, open the bypass valve to fill the tank (With the Pressure/Temperature Relief valve open, and flush out all air. Then reset the valves and move on to having fun.
    6 points
  45. Greetings. As a retired mechanical engineer who worked a bit with fasteners (although not wheel studs and lug nuts) I thought I’d offer a few points for the group to mull over. Twisting the lug nut onto the wheel stud induces a a clamping force to keep the wheel on the hub. That clamping force is controlled in part by the torque applied to the nut. But that clamping force is also affected by thread geometry, stud diameter, nut contact area and friction on the threads and the nut to wheel contact surface. Think of the difference between torquing rusty, corroded threads versus fresh, lubricated threads. The torque level should be specified as a min/max range about an optimum sweet spot for the design, not just a single value. Too little clamping force a.k.a. torque and the nuts can work loose, fretting and wear can occur, and/or the studs could be subject to metal fatigue - none of which are good as you all can imagine. Too much torque could cause the stud stress to reach or exceed the plastic limit proof load of the fastener. That’s why, Dexter stated a 120 ft-lb limit for the 1/2” high strength grade 8 stud as shown by Mike D. JD described what generally happens when folks inadvertently over torque fasteners. Excessive clamp load or torque might also distort/damage the wheel but I’m not aware of how this could result in catastrophic failure which is what I think was the concern with the 120 ft-lb specification. Moral of the story: 1. Purchase and use a good quality torque wrench. Human “feelings” are not a good, well calibrated substitute. And use the recommended torquing sequence! 2. If the lug nut is torqued to or somewhat beyond the maximum limit and the stud hasn’t twisted off, the wheel isn’t going anywhere. 3. Under torqued lug nuts can be a problem. JD discussed torque wrench calibration and the issues for the high side of torque. But a similar issue exists for an inaccurate torque wrench or “human feel” for the low end of the torque range. 4. The proper torque range is specified in SAE or ISO fastener standards for the hub and wheel configuration. (Sorry, don’t have that info available. And BTW, Oliver, Dexter or the wheel supplier need to provide the torque range for the fastener condition.) If this thread is concerned about the effects of excessive torque on the wheel, maybe we could better detail what we think those concerns are and then reach out to Oliver or the wheel supplier for more specific information.
    6 points
  46. Yes they do. Our 2021 has the vents even though we chose lithiums. I would think, from a liability standpoint, it makes sense to leave them in place. If a change is made to standard wet cells, lack of ventilation could result in an explosion. Easy to add a layer of insulation inside the cover panel eliminating the ventilation and providing additional insulation to the lithiums in freezing weather. My plan is to use closed cell foam insulation attached to the cover with velcro so that the insulation can be easily removed. Our low temp over the winter was in the mid teens F and the battery temp never got below 40 degrees F. That with a small space heater set on low in the main cabin. We powered up the battery heating pad although I do not know if the BMS ever sent power to the pad. Also kept the Truma heater on during cold weather.
    6 points
  47. EDIT: see related thread - https://olivertraveltrailers.com/forums/topic/6812-check-your-rear-jack-mount-hardware-bottom-frame-bolts-were-1-turn-loose/ I serviced the two rear gearboxes and then to my dismay the right one refused to go up or down under a load - STUCK. I use the emergency crank tool to see what was going on, using the square shaft on top of the gearbox, and it was really really tight, something was binding for sure, so I removed the three Allen screws and lifted off the gearbox. And tried to turn the lower screw part using the other end of the tool. FAIL - it is too short to clear the surrounding fiberglass bed support, it would only move about 170 degrees. I said some very bad words, and I am glad I did not have to deal with a failed gearbox in the boonies, I would have been stuck. I needed a short length of heavy steel tubing with a 1/2” inside diameter so I could make an extension. I found that a 3/8” MPT pipe nipple works perfectly. Unfortunately that size is hard to find and about double the price of a more common 1/2” MPT nipple. Here is what the end of the tool looks like, the part that drives the lower jackscrew, under the motor unit. I used a 3/8” MPT x 6” nipple, the longest I could find at Home Depot. Drill out the internal burrs and the long seam weld using a 1/2” drill bit and cut off the threaded ends. Cut the tool in the center of the straight part and insert each piece into the nipple 1”. Drill and install two 5/16” roll pins and trm any excess material so you don’t cut yourself using the modified tool. It is a very snug fit, I considered adding epoxy but that isn’t needed. NOTE I turned the end 90 degrees from the original orientation, so the tool will lie completely flat in a galley drawer without gouging the drawer bottom. I was able to free up the lower part by turning it back and forth to get the jack working properly. THEN I found the true cause, the support bolts that go through the trailer frame were super loose. I turned all four (two per side) one full turn before they tightened to 43 ft lbs. Now both jacks run much better under a load. I started a service ticket and will make a new thread about the loose bolts. I hope a few owners will look at their tool and measure the part with the pin in it. If it is 5 inches, it will be useless in an emergency. I am curious to know if everybody has a disfunctional tool like mine. John Davies Spokane WA
    6 points
  48. Your pictures are fine at the size they are! But if you want to change the size, here is how. Upload the picture and insert it into the message field. Then double click on the picture, which brings up this dialog box shown below. (Note I am using a web browser on a laptop. It might be different on a phone or a tablet.) The default is 1000 pixels in width for high resolution images, but this will be a lower number for low resolution images. If you enter 500 pixels into the width box your picture will be one-half the size. You should keep the box checked for Keep Oriinal Aspect Ratio, unless you want to squish your picture in funny ways. Then click on the Update button Note you can also add a Title for the image, and set the alignment if desired.
    6 points
  49. Just wanted to report on some extraordinary customer service I have received from Blue Sky Energy a division of Sunforge that manufactures the Blue Sky Solar Boost model 3024iL I have on my Oliver. After our return home from a week in southern Utah the thing died on me out of nowhere. Called the company the engineer or tech guy had me go through a few of the settings on the IPN Remote controller and decided I should send it. Said they would repair it for free, this after 7 years of use and 2 years out of warranty. Only thing I had to loose was shipping to the company and of course I gladly obliged. Turns out the inductor had a broken leg, so they replaced that as well as the relay, and updated the firmware then packed it back up and its on its way back all in one day. No charge, not even for the return postage. Wow! I don't why Oliver decided to eliminate this company from their solar setups but I rarely if ever have experienced such great support. Highly recommended for anyone needing a solar charging system. Thanks
    6 points
  50. City of Rocks is an 1.5 hours from our home town. We have been climbing and camping there for 22 years. Unfortunately, when the weather is nice, the camping in the park fills up quickly. There are boondock opportunities close by. Also, there is a state park (Smokey Mountain Campground) close by as well as an additional adjacent park called Castle Rocks State Parks that is also beautiful and has additional beautiful climbing and hiking. It is one of our favorite places. Kirk
    6 points
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