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  1. First, thank you all for being generous with your time. I found many detailed answers in the forum and the broader community was a major factor in deciding on an Oliver. This will be my first travel trailer. It is perfect for me and my wife and our two miniature dachshunds. Kids started college and we are still a few years out from retirement. But we can see it coming up fast. My wife is a history teacher and I own my own business - so we spend most of our time in California (Ventura County) and summers and holidays in Williamsburg VA. My toolbox consists of a wrench and a roll of duct tape. But I am up for the adventure and look forward to acquiring new skills. I have to say I am very impressed with all of you and look forward to getting to know you. Rich and Christine Mutell
    17 points
  2. I announced a couple weeks back that we would be selling our Oliver after having our baby. We also decided that we would take the Oliver for one last spin with our baby for the memories. We live in central Louisiana, and our goal was to get to Grayton Beach State Park and Topsail State Park in Florida. The total drive time getting there was about 6-7 hours plus the pit stops we needed to take. For our first night though, we stayed in Baton Rouge. We arrived during a tornado watch at 10pm due to weather delays and I set up in the pouring rain. Our baby had a hard time sleeping this night as well and my wife and I decided “NOPE!” We both wanted to cancel the trip. We decided during lunch the next day to push forward and really give it a try instead of cancelling. We are so glad and thankful that we pushed forward. It was one of our favorite and sweetest camping experiences of our life. Grayton state park and Topsail state park are incredible locations if you can get a spot. The surrounding area (30A) is also very nice and family friendly with great restaurants, cafes, and breweries. Our legacy elite II twin layout worked perfectly for us. Our baby slept in one of the twin beds with a rail guard protector I installed, and I slept on the twin bed table area conversion. We will probably look into getting a custom twin bed for this spot and have it set up permanently as we rarely used the table anyway. The one issue we did run into is that our baby hates riding in the carseat, which makes a 6-7 hour drive a bit difficult. We solved this by leaving very early in the morning for the drive there and for the drive home. How early? 4AM & 3AM respectively We loved the trip so much, we decided we are not going to sell our camper for now and hold onto this to continue making special memories.
    15 points
  3. I requested that production swap the furnace & water heater locations because the furnace ducting was running right over the top of the water heater bypass valve. This made locating the valve difficult for new owners as well as having to move the duct aside with the potential to tear it. Hopefully this change has made it better for access and does not cause any issues. I have also requested the return air vents as well and they did start putting a return vent in the bath where the air can return below the dinette about a year ago. They are still working on getting one placed in the closet which should be one on the top & one on the bottom for better air circulation through that area. The return air vents is something that can be easily added on older models if you choose to.
    14 points
  4. We recently had to retire our iPhone 7’s as Apple is no longer going to push IOS updates out for our older phones and our phones could not be updated. Our phones kept getting “No service” icons and Apple could not fix the issue. Planned obsolescence?? (We learned this icon signaled a failure of an iPhone component.) So, the dreaded and costly update to new phones had to happen. We decided to bite the bullet and purchase outright (2) new iPhone 14’s and continue with our Verizon plan. I attached a tutorial video of the new iPhone 14 SOS feature. There maybe other better tutorials out there, but this pretty much covers the basics. The SOS feature is provided “free of charge” for the first two years and it’s a subscription after that. It will be interesting to see what Apple charges for the subscription service. Needless to say the SOS feature could really come in handy in an emergency situation where no cell service is available and we need emergency services. Just passing this info forward in the event anyone is looking at purchasing a new iPhone. Naturally we hope we never need the SOS feature, however it is a peace of mind to know that we have it available in an emergency. Happy and Safe Travels! Patriot🇺🇸
    14 points
  5. We will be launching a branded store in the upcoming months. Our obstacle is finding the right partner (supplier) that can offer quality merchandise and dropship for us. We really don't want to inventory apparel here. We have tried a few vendors and one is promising but not happy with the embroidery yet. We are just getting our Rewards Program finalized and will be launched probably tomorrow. Once that project is underway, we can get back to our store project!
    14 points
  6. Bosker sleeps so well in The Wonder Egg that sometimes he just doesn't want to get up.
    12 points
  7. After 4 years of camping and towing with our Elite II, I wouldn’t want to be towing anything any longer than 25’. The Oliver size gives a lot more freedom for travel overall and is still very well equipped and comfortable. And it’s not just about campground site choices, although that is a big factor, both for site options and cost at campgrounds. Longer/bigger spaces cost more at most campgrounds. It’s also taking into consideration things like getting in and out of gas stations, parking spaces at restaurants and other roadside stops and attractions, very narrow construction zones, etc. We have even encountered roads with length limits because of tight corner switchbacks on steep climbs. The Elite II is a nice comfortable compact trailer that is short enough, narrow enough and low enough to avoid most of the common obstacles you will encounter on the road like low clearance bridges, tunnels, etc. The Zion Mt. Carmel Tunnel in Utah is one example that we drove through. There is a 7’ 10” width limit and a 11’ 4” height limit. Anything over a combined length limit of 50’ for tow vehicle/trailer combinations is completely prohibited in the tunnel. Anything much bigger than towing an Elite II and you have to arrange (and pay for) the park rangers to allow special access with traffic temporarily changed to one direction only instead of two way traffic so larger vehicles can fit through the tunnel. My wife and I are both retired and we do extended trips of 4 to 5 weeks on the road and we are very comfortable in the Ollie. And we added a shower curtain with 3M command hooks so it gives us a “dry bath” setup. The shower curtain can be easily removed to take outside to dry.
    11 points
  8. We camp mostly in public campgrounds. National Parks are generally the most restrictive, size wise. Most have some sites that accommodate big rigs but an Elite II size camper can fit in most any site. State Parks vary but usually have larger sites. COE and USFS campgrounds also vary, the newer ones can fit about anything, but some of the older or more remote campgrounds can be restrictive. It’s not just the size of the campsite to consider but also maneuvering truck and trailer during the back in. There have been a number of times that the site was just long enough for our Oliver, but backing it in proved to be challenging due to the narrow road or obstacles. I watched a guy trying to back in a trailer, probably 28’ or so, into a spot at a Tennessee State Park and it took him a couple of hours. He tried everything, to include going around the loop several times to change his angle and also going the wrong way to see if that would work. His frustration was evident. Mike
    11 points
  9. I have pulled into CG late (traveling, not 'camping') , and have the Ranger say we are mostly full. Look at the LE2 and say but we got a small site that you will fit into. Enjoy your evening...
    11 points
  10. My son and I completed ceramic coating our Oliver Elite II Hull#1240 and I posted some pictures on the Facebook group and was asked to provide a list of products we used in the process. So instead of just pasting a long message into the group I decided to create a separate document that could be used as a reference. So I'm posting it here on the Forum for those who may be interested in DIY Ceramic Coating. I hope others find it useful. Thanks, Martin Oliver Elite II Hull 1240 Ceramic Coating Reference.pdf
    11 points
  11. Here are some bullet points about the new Oliver Rewards Program. Hopefully it will help explain some of the questions. The new Rewards Program replaces the old Field Visit Program. Instead of getting a check mailed to you if a prospect purchases after completing a field visit, you get paid on an Oliver Rewards Mastercard Debit Card. This is not a credit card. There is no line of credit like a credit card has. There isn't a credit pull or anything. It is just a branded re-loadable gift card that we load money onto when you complete activities. You can setup a PIN to get cash out of a ATM as well. You also will get paid for just showing your travel trailer, regardless if the prospect purchases or not. We know the hours it takes to clean your trailer, to spend time with the prospects, and Oliver wants to reward you for that, which we didn't previously do. If the prospect does purchase a new Oliver, you get even more Reward Dollars after the sale is finalized - the amount depends on your tier. In this new program, you will get this reward when their order is finalized rather than waiting for checks to be mailed after delivery. As of right now, we consider the order as finalized 90 days before the production start date. So you will get this a little quicker than before. And those that want to be ambitious to get to higher tiers, they can make more Reward Dollars for the individual activities that are completed. Also, look at the Tier Perks. Those are gifts (non-taxable) you get for being a member of each tier. These are just a way of us saying thanks for you taking part in the program. The $20 service fee is new to this program. It is really a deduction of the first Reward for the year. If you don’t complete any activities for the year, you will not have to pay this fee. It is called a Service Fee but it is not an out-of-pocket expense. We will be adding more activities that people can do in the future. You will be required to submit details of completed activities on the Oliver website. This helps us make sure we are rewarding everyone properly. Now that we have over 1300 Oliver owners, we need our checks and balances to reward everyone that deserves to get them. It is a lot to keep up with and a lot more work on our part. As far as the 1099 goes, we are required by the IRS to 1099 anyone that earns $600 or more. This is not new. We had to 1099 owners in our previous Field Visit Program when individuals made $600 or more in a year. If you don't want to be 1099'd, you can still complete activities and earn less than $600 and stop doing activities once you reach the threshold. We apologize that the Terms & Condition are so much, but as a company we had to do our due diligence to protect all parties involved. With this, we have made changes how we setup field visits. For all prospects that contact us to see an owner's trailer, we now require the prospect to sign a Hold Harmless agreement that protects the owner when conducting a field visit. We have this signed by the prospect before setting up the field visit. This did not exist under the old program. We know many of you have helped us by showing your trailer in the past and didn't do it for the money, but we wanted to build a great program to reward everyone for their time and efforts to grow our brand. We are very thankful for everyone that has helped us over the years! Obviously the launch of this program is new. We will monitor and revise it as we gather feedback and where opportunities exist to make it better. If anyone has questions, please don't hesitate to message me.
    11 points
  12. Dolly at the start of the day then after a day of camping!
    11 points
  13. According to NBC News the latest craze is paper maps. AAA are evidently printing more than they have in a long time. Interesting that the increase in demand is from the younger generations. I know I like my Garmin for turn by turn directions, but nothing replaces my Gazetteer or Road Atlas. Especially for planning purposes. Especially nice to find interesting side trips out around the boring interstates...
    10 points
  14. 30 years of land navigation in the army, usually with at 1:50,000 folded map sheet, trained my brain to be comfortable with a paper map. I like my GPS’s for turn by turn directions, but we also carry a big atlas with us for planning and exploring alternate routes. Mike
    10 points
  15. You are all silly. The OP is clearly the web developer at Oliver. They have linked a blog post FROM THE OLIVER WEBSITE to this form. My guess is they are trying to add informative content to the website in an attempt get get more website hits and improve search results. For example, if someone is wanting to read about toy haulers (or travel trailers in general based on other blog post) Oliver is trying to lure them to their website.
    10 points
  16. We will not be signing up. The $20 annual "debit" against rewards, and the indemnification language in the Terms and Conditions are more than sufficient to persuade us to "Just Say No." The Indemnification paragraph reads: "9. Indemnification You agree to defend, indemnify and hold Oliver, its subsidiaries, affiliates, partners, licensors, officers, directors, employees, and agents harmless for any loss, damages or costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any third-party claim, action, or demand resulting from your participation in the Rewards Program in violation of any law, rule, regulation or these Terms." This means that if someone gets hurt when you are showing your Oliver and includes Oliver as a defendant in an ensuing personal injury suit along with you, you get to pay not only your defense costs, but Oliver's defense costs, and to pay any resulting judgment not only against you, but against Oliver. No rewards program provides sufficient incentive for us to assume this kind of financial exposure. We left Hohenwald with high regard for Oliver's Sales and Service team. Reviewing the Terms and Conditions of the new rewards program has diminished, not enhanced, our view of Oliver Travel Trailers as a company.
    10 points
  17. Take a look at this old thread and comment afterwards. https://olivertraveltrailers.com/forums/topic/3145-owner-personal-liability-if-prospective-buyer-injures-himself/ This new program sure looks like an official business arrangement, with “sales employees” who get financially reimbursed for advertising work that benefits the company….. I did not read the fine details, does Oliver TT say anything about this issue? FYI, while I stopped officially showing “Mouse” due to liability concerns. I still do frequent walk around tours. The last was in October ‘22 to a milling and excited crowd of about 25 retired women who meet at campgrounds to do stuff together like biking or golfing. Three of them physically blocked the road as I was trying to exit in the morning. That was a hoot, I thought I might get kissed at one point. Didn’t happen, darn it. John Davies Spokane WA
    10 points
  18. I was reading John Davies post for improving the propane tank hoses and it reminded me of a mod I made several years ago. My shorter OEM Propane tanks leaves a lot of excess all-thread to spin up and down at every tank service. I thought about cutting the all-thread shorter, but discarded the idea as the next owner down the road may be a cold weather camper and want the taller tanks. My solution was to grab out of my garage a pair of washers and some tubing that would fit over the all-thread. I cut the tubing to leave about an inch of all-thread showing. One washer on each side of the tubing and I only have to spin off the wing nut about an inch. Saves time and knuckle damage. Cost: $0.00 GJ
    9 points
  19. Welcome. If your wrench s an adjustable one you are all set. Standard on one side, metric on the other. A pair of screwdrivers and a hammer should complete your tool box (to start). Advice: the "stuff" you think you might need and start to accumulate, think twice. There are stores everywhere in the USA. After 7 years we are still taking "stuff" out that we have never used and leaving it home. We still have 2 cabinets full of "stuff" we might someday need...
    9 points
  20. @Geronimo Johnyour comments brings to mind what I've always thought about the unique designs of the Oliver Campers. I know folks tend to have a preconceived mindset regarding camper size and especially galley and bathroom requirements. Those of us that appreciate the design characteristics of the Oliver Campers probably recognize the amount of thought that went into every aspect of their campers. They seem to have focused on maximizing the function while maintaining a minimal envelope to attain those goals. Towing efficiency and ease of towing to the destination also seem to be primary goals, hence the overall size and shape. And of course durability is an overriding requirement in their priorities. I don't know if any other company has tried to marry all these requirements to the level that Oliver has succeeded in their trailers. Every aspect is challenged by the cost control piece of the puzzle, but unlike other companies, Oliver appears to try and control costs secondary to the quality component, and the feature component rides very high in that chain of priorities.
    9 points
  21. Good point Mountainman! To that I add that an LE2 when being towed pretty much is in the wind shadow of our full sized Tow Vehicles. With Ollie's rounded shape the aerodynamic drag created is minimal compared to just about all "Stick Builts" and wider fiberglass trailers. I have taken many showers in trailers over the years. Not once have I not dried the shower stall for sanitation, mold/mildew prevention or just to make it look nice for my bride. The time it takes to dry our Ollie bath after a shower is less than a minute or two to more than to dry a dry bath shower. Yet as said above, having the square footage for other uses is huge in our well laid out LE2's.
    9 points
  22. That is REALLY common with tandem axles, it is called shackle flip. Mine does it on both sides whenever I service the bearings. The easy peasy way to fix it is to find a parking lot with curbs, island landscaping works great, then drive both the wonky side tires up and along the curb. Bang, it will flip back where it belongs. You can do it on city streets too but it is harder, you have to find a curb cut (driveway) and be a lot more precise in your steering,. I don’t understand why this isn’t in the owners manuals. I bet Oliver Service gets really tired about talking about this. I have had to fix it on “Mouse” maybe a half a dozen times. John Davies Spokane WA
    9 points
  23. We also toiled over this topic for several years. We struggled with the "need" of more room inside and also the "need" to bring toys along. We were seriously considering a 25' ATC toy hauler to serve all those needs. Well long story short we concluded with time that where we really wanted to camp was more important than both the need to bring too much stuff along and also the need for extra living space. I'm not necessarily concerned with the smallish interior because we are traveling to enjoy the outside that we are traveling to. We will mostly just sleep in the camper and clean up. But the rest is outside or away from the camper and that's our priority. I don't have to worry about if we'll fit or can we get their with the rig. So to boil it down, where do you want to spend your time camping? Make sure your choice serves that primary purpose first. For our plans the Ollie is by far the best choice.
    9 points
  24. We never “plan” a trip. We know the endpoint and not much else. Never made reservations more than a few hours in advance and have never had a problem getting a spot. We don’t use any apps to find spots to camp. Just look on a paper map for a place to stop. We mostly boondock. We never have any problems finding water to fill the tank or a free dump site. I don’t like being tied to any schedules. Nearly two decades of school and four plus decades in the medical field gave me a lifetime’s worth of conformity. If I make plans, it feels like I’m being told what to do. I don’t like being told what to do, even if it’s myself doing the telling.
    9 points
  25. I always have this in the truck with us. It has come on handy in areas without cellular, and where the Garmin shows blank spaces. Currently at 18 Gazetteers. It holds five, along with a few folding maps, a notepad, and a couple pencils.
    9 points
  26. We use this “cube” and like it so much we purchased a second one. We have it mounted at the rear of our night stand with a small piece of clear Velcro. We just use the plug at the top left hand side of ceiling. And neatly hide the charger cord behind self adhesive cable race way.
    9 points
  27. Highly recommend the Anker brand of USB chargers. We have several of their multi-point chargers and they have been flawless for about 5 years now. Anker battery packs were what my (now former) airline provided to all of the pilots for use with our flight deck iPads. Don’t know if that’s a solid referral, but it should be.
    9 points
  28. Made a quick trip through the Tractor Supply in Lewiston, Maine. Was surprised to see a new 8' display of RV supplies. Will have to go back when have more time. Big new plastic wedges for the tires (means I can leave the heavy rubber ones home?)? Water hoses, dogbones, sewer connections and whatever. At least I will have to go back and make a mental note of what is there. I know TS are everywhere and if I need something like I might remember I can scoot in and get. Have to check prices too, as probably a lot better than some RV dealers, with better parking with a trailer on?
    9 points
  29. valley of fire 45 minutes north of las vegas is an amazing place. also red rocks is worth taking a day to tour (no a place to camp at red rocks)
    9 points
  30. I find it perplexing that a few folks on the Oliver forum complain about restrictive practices on the Oliver Facebook page and other social media platforms, and then want to limit the scope of conversations and topics on this forum. I'll be the first one to say that some topics, language and view points can come across as distasteful, or inappropriate. But discussing different aspects of RVing in general is as far from those bad characteristics as a discussion could be. Complaining and even demanding the removal of any thread or conversation pertaining to any aspect of RVing comes across to me as most exclusive and distasteful, as long as the discussion maintains a respectful tone. There are a number of topics that I have found to be of little interest to me on this forum, so I don't bother to follow them. But topics of general interest about RV travels are always interesting to me. I'd rather read them here than have to search the net to find them. I hope that when we attend our first Oliver Rally we aren't made to feel like we can only talk about Oliver campers.
    9 points
  31. I’m speaking for myself here, not the other moderators. If an owner, Oliver employee, or even a prospective owner wants to post a general interest RV or camping article I don’t see any issue. We’ve had owners sell their Oliver and purchase other brands (Black Series, Airstream and Kimberly) and have posted about them with discussions and questions that followed from current owners. If a post or article has grammatical error that’s okay, too. We have members who join and don’t have a clue about camping or RV’s (like I was 8 years ago) and what Jason posted would be educational to them. I didn’t know what a Toy Hauler was back when I joined the forum. I learned a lot from the Fiberglass RV Forum, Airstream Forum and this forum. I don’t see any marketing of other brand trailers going on, just general interest educational, pros/cons, etc. What is not acceptable are offensive posts and posts that are soliciting business. Unlike the Facebook group, we do allow links to products and information that owners post to be helpful to other owners. If a thread or post is not of interest to you, don’t read it. Mike
    9 points
  32. all really great stuff. thanks to everyone. we got a break in the weather mid-morning and decided to pack up and head for home. the wind was our biggest concern. Crossing the Golden Gate Bridge was reasonable. This made us feel a lot better about our decision to travel. Lots of small slides, standing water and raging rivers but we have just arrived at home.... and lots of down trees and the power is out here. One more night in the trailer will more comfortable than our home... glad to be home after 7 weeks. thanks all
    9 points
  33. You can’t see the trailer behind, as it is still in the parts bins in Hohenwald. 😉 @bugeyedriver older cousin; 1958 MGA 1500 Roadster
    8 points
  34. Welcome to the Oliver Forum and thanks for introducing yourselves. We are still in a hold pattern waiting on production of hull #1373, due sometime in mid April. It builds excitement for us each time we hear of a new owner taking their Ollie home. There is a great group of folks here to get to know, learn from and share experiences with and the more the merrier. Congratulations!
    8 points
  35. We come from a backpacking, canoe camping, car camping and pop-up trailer background, so our 18.5 ft LE feels like a palace 🙂 As others above have said, our intention is to be outdoors, experiencing the nature and scenery around us, so time inside the trailer is usually reserved for sleeping, inclement weather and some but not all of the cooking. The short LE fits well in most commercial campgrounds/state parks and almost all BLM/COE/USFS sites we have enjoyed. The older national park campgrounds can be a problem, as indicated above. This year we had a difficult site in Zion's older South Campground... the campground loop road was quite narrow so there was minimal tow vehicle maneuvering room. The pad for our site was perpendicular to the road, not angled to ease the backing-in process. As the final challenge, there was a tree on one corner of the site's entrance and a big rock on the other! Fortunately... the site directly opposite ours was empty both when we arrived and when we departed, so there was a place to maneuver the front of the truck partway through the alignment process. Our second night was in Zion's Watchman Campground (couldn't get 2 consecutive nights in the same site) which seems to be somewhat newer, and the loop road and sites were slightly wider and nicely angled. Someday maybe we'll have tow vehicles with all-wheel or joystick steering 🙂
    8 points
  36. Isn't the English language wonderful? Specifics, specifics! You need to raise the tire that is connected to the axle where the shackle is in the correct position. By doing this you take the pressure off the shackle that has been "flipped" thus allowing it both room (to unflip) and lack of resistance (pressure) so that it can unflip. All of this occurs on the side of the trailer that has the flipped shackle. In my example it really doesn't matter if you put the 4x4 under the front or the rear tire. Nor does it matter which shackle is flipped. This is because if the front shackle is flipped and you put the 4x4 under the front tire - nothing will happen as you drive forward over the 4x4. But, as you continue to drive over the 4x4 with the rear tire the front shackle will flip back to its "normal" position. This same principal is true for JD's solution using a curb. Hope this helps! Bill
    8 points
  37. Wow - I would have been totally freaked if this had happened to us - thanks so much for sharing! While the method used in this video is not as good as the 4x4 you all mentioned, at 2:37 you can get a feel for the sound of the correction-flip. Thanks again!!
    8 points
  38. We had an Escape owner stop and look at our Oiver on his way home to Canada. Back then there was a concern about importing to Canada ( since solved). He asked if I would like to see his. After the Oliver it felt claustrophobic to me, but what really got me was the table. It was as shaky as my mother's old wooden ironing board. If the first thing you saw was that quality??
    8 points
  39. As for the wet bath, it was a big concern of mine as well. I won't lie, I miss the big shower and dry bath in our last fifth wheel. Luxury. Being 6' myself, washing my hair in the Ollie requires bending over, which I don't love. However, so far the other Ollie advantages - including its compact size, quality, and solar/lithium - have outweighed the shower drawbacks. Last summer we got the last available site in a COE campground. It was designated as a tent/pop-up site but we fit just fine. This year we're staying in a state park we couldn't fit in before, even with our 27' travel trailer.
    8 points
  40. That's where I thought we'd end up, having friends with both 17 and 21 Escape trailers. Which reminds me; we're still on the list to reserve one of the 23s! They're just now only making the second prototype, with at least one more to go before making 10 field trial units. Then production. Early last year I was expecting production in late '22, but now I'd bet late '23 might be even optimistic. And then there are the hundreds of people already on the wait list to place orders. Seeing what they're doing with the shower makes it not only tiny, but awkward to get to the bed, and for a 23, it seems like it will be crowded inside. Until I saw the Oliver, I didn't realize how open it makes a trailer feel having the bathroom across one end of the trailer! I'm so glad we ended up ordering the Oliver! Good luck in whatever you choose, @dennis
    8 points
  41. Hi Dennis, We were also on the attack concerning a wet bath but actually don't mind it at all now. It does add to the moisture content inside the trailer, especially on rainy days, and drying the towels outside when you can helps a great deal. We were in a Casita for 2 years (full timers) and really, really appreciate the added room inside of our Elite II. We don't do the National Parks much ( crowds) but for the most part it has been very rare to find a spot too small. As Mike mentioned, maneuverability is important and we also have been in spots and had to disconnect to park alongside or in front of the trailer. So, going from the Casita to the Oliver leads us to believe we're inside a mansion every time we go inside. FWIW, IMO, if you think it's a little small and you really don't want the wet bath, you'll probably be unsatisfied with the Oliver. For us it the Cadillac of fiberglass and the service from Oliver is the best there is so we're as happy as we can be. You might consider renting a bigger rig and see how you like it before making a costly mistake. Another point is resale of a "stickie" vs fiberglass. Best of luck with your decision and retired life, John
    8 points
  42. dennis - I too thought that the wet bath in the Oliver would be a show stopper for me. But, for the first time in recent memory 😁, I was completely wrong. Given the amount of time I spend in the bath versus the value of that same square footage used elsewhere for the rest of the day and the alternatives that are available for bathing, it really is a no-brainer (for me). It is amazing just how simple it is to "dry" the wet bath after showering and then I've got a "clean" shower too. If your travel plans include the western US then anything over that 25 foot mark becomes reasonably restrictive. Even here in the eastern US I believe that you will find both camping and traveling (towing) an RV over 25 feet to be much more taxing and generally less enjoyable. But, only you can make this decision. And, it depends on how and where you like to travel and camp. Bill
    8 points
  43. Agreed. We carry this large format road atlas/national park guide. Using this in conjunction with the Google Maps app, Harvest Host app, etc. has been great for our trip planning.
    8 points
  44. Our original thought for the vent, was the bathroom exhaust fan. If you go into the bathroom, turn on the exhaust, and then close the door you can hear the fan struggle hard to work. Open the door and you can literally hear the fan relax. If this is the case there must be a negative pressure (vacuum) situation going on. So, thinking the inverse might also be true, came the idea for the vent. Thinking that with the door closed, like when using the bathroom, there would be a positive pressure when the heater fan was blowing. So the vent would allow the heat duct to "relax" and allow the air to get out and to the return air vent, hence increasing the heat flow to the bathroom. As you can see by the candle flame movement there certainly is air flow. We did restrict the air flow to the duct opening under the bed so that that air did not go out and immediately go into the return. We think the bathroom is a lot warmer in cool weather. We could have done the same thing by leaving the bathroom door open, as some do, but find that inconvenient while using the dinette.
    8 points
  45. Your nasty toxic negative posts are really getting old. If you don’t like a particular post I would encourage you to just simply take a breath and keep right on scrolling. It’s pretty simple to do. There is absolutely nothing wrong with being decent, kind and respectful, as words really do matter. Maybe just give it a try. -Patriot🇺🇸
    8 points
  46. I’m back and I think I resolved my issue I had to wait until after the new year so I had some free time. After many phone calls and web searching I decided to try what I read on some other RV forums. This is not an uncommon problem and it drives not only me crazy but a lot of other people in the RV word. From what I can deduce the actual temperature sensor lives in the AC unit on the ceiling not in the thermostat mounted on the wall. This poses a problem because heat rises into the unit then it cools fast because it is against the roof and not on an interior wall. so I isolated the thermostat wires coming from the furnace and with the use of a DPDT switch I isolated the furnace from the AC altogether. Now the heat in the trailer is controlled from the battery operated thermostat independent from the AC. If I put the switch up I have heat controlled by the remote battery operated thermostat and no more cycling on and off. If I want AC I switch the switch down and now the AC works exactly the way it was wired originally using the Dometic thermostat installed by Oliver. So far it seems to have fixed the problem completely. Now that the cycling has stopped I plan to add a return air vent under the front Dinette along the floor. That should help with the return air flow by taking the return air directly from the floor up front away from the supply air. Sent from my iPad
    8 points
  47. I now carry a small waste tote (empty) in the bed of my truck. But, with an RV I owned prior to seeing the light and getting my Ollie I constructed a storage rack for this tote which I attached to the rear bumper via two slightly larger square steel tubes such that the rack could be inserted into those two tubes and secured with four pins. I think that a similar system could be used with the Oliver but I've never had enough interest to work on it.
    8 points
  48. Oliver uses a DPDT switch here but only one of the poles is utilized. Therefore, use the three inline terminals on either side/pole of the switch. You could look for use-marks on the switch terminals to determine which pole the wires were on originally. Two of three wires (travelers) should be the same color. The third, different color, wire comes from the fuse. Connect the fuse wire to the middle or common terminal and the other two to either of the end terminals, doesn't matter which.
    8 points
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