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hellsbay

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  1. image corrupted. please upload.
  2. You might check my article on "Camping Under The Bloodmoon", further down in this forum. If you are into really simple food for lunch, try Hazel's Hot Dog stand. They are really good, especially the 'Spicey Dog'. The are located here:2400 N Ponce De Leon Blvd Saint Augustine, FL 32084
  3. Thanks for the comments. I will try to contribute here as much as time allows.
  4. Home can mean many things to many people..., but for me this fall, it was my Oliver Travel Trailer. Hull #23 was my home, office, retreat in bad weather and my studio. For just under a month my Oliver kept me comfortable, well rested and able to do one of the things I enjoy most..., explore and photograph America. My journey started in SW Florida and took me to the southern coast of Maine to photograph lighthouses. Littered with lighthouses, the coast of Maine is also known for lobsters and all I can say is, they were very good. If you ever make it to Pemaquid Point near New Harbor, Shaws is the place to go. It's a quaint little restaurant on the shore where you can feast on any kind of lobster meal and watch the lobster boats unloading lobsters while you are eating. After photographing the Pemaquid Head Light I traveled north to Bass Harbor and the Bass Harbor Head Light. I finally made all the way up the coast to Nova Scotia to photograph the most north and eastern lighthouse in the US, the West Quoddy Head Light. From there I headed west along the US/Canadian border through the Great North Woods, finally dropping down to Ricketts Glenn in Pennsylvania. Ricketts Glen is a state park and home to over 20 waterfalls. From Rickkets Glen I headed south to West Virginia and the Dolly Sods Wilderness. Located in the Allegheny Mountains, the Dolly Sods is a high plateau more reminiscent of the tundra than any thing else. Covered in wild cranberry and blueberries with large boulders and overlooking the eastern Alleghenies, it makes for some fantastic landscape photography. Waking up at 0 dark hundred every morning and traveling the 17 miles from my camp to Bear Rocks at the top is a real eye opening experience. These are all mountain trail/roads with switchbacks that require use of mostly second and third gear. It does not require four wheel drive however and a stock vehicle can make it as long as it's not raining. My camp was in the Canaan Valley State Park, a very comfortable and well run operation with a beautiful lodge. During the day and between photo shoots, I found myself sitting in an easy chair in front of a huge fireplace working on my computer. Not too shabby for a guy who likes to be off the grid. Heading a little north to the Cranberry Wilderness, I was back 'off the grid' for my next and final camp of this month long trip. The beauty of the Cranberry Wilderness in fall colors is beyond words. Steps away from my camp was the Williams River, a small but beautiful trout stream meandering through the wilderness on it's way to the Potomac River. Arriving home fairly well rested and excited to work on my raw images, I had a week before heading down to Islamorada in the Florida Keys for some sight fishing for bonefish and redfish in the Keys and Everglades. Ahhh, but that will have to be another story and adventure. PS: I had several more images to add here but apparently I am only allowed three. To see other images from this trip and beyond go to Steve Petersen Photography on Facebook. It's a public site and anyone can go there to view my images. Thanks, Steve
  5. One problem that I have recognized with my Oliver is that a good deal of the time I am camped under trees which will not allow the sun to reach a roof mounted solar. For those times a small and light Honda 1000 will recharge your batts. If I think I will use the AC then I have to bring my Yamaha 3000 gen. I have also found that when parked under or near trees that the reception on my Kingdome is nonexistent. I now use a portable Tailgater for TV.
  6. I have the extra awning and am very happy with it. Not only does it shade the other side but when it rains, you can keep the windows open. Sometimes I will partially deploy the extra awning.
  7. The people at the Oliver factory sent me a replacement window and I had it installed at a local RV repair shop for about $50.
  8. I agree with allenpamela completely. It's valuable to be able to look at Olivers that have been listed and sold.
  9. Without pictures, most of us are left clueless as to the specifics of what you guys are talking about.
  10. These tables look very good and would be great in the Olivers. Maybe Oliver R&D could purchase one and figure out how to make their own for the Oliver.
  11. For anyone with a MAC, this is very easy. Just click on Sarari at the top left and and in the drop down menu pick reset Safari. Check the first two boxes and hit reset. Done.
  12. I am in Sandston, Va and headed back to S. Fla tomorrow.
  13. Thanks everyone for the nice comments. I will continue to post here in a effort to help this forum come alive. I know there are other owners out there that are using their rigs and can contribute as well. As far as my Oliver goes, the more I use it the more I realize how special it is. I really appreciate all the thought that went into it's design and production.
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