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carolann

BLASPHEMOUS QUESTION

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This is being asked out of obvious ignorance. If Oliver and similar travel trailers are considered fiberglass, what are all those others referred to--you know, the Jaycos, et al. And what are the biggest differences between the two categories? I know towability would be one. The non-fiberglass types are much more affordable. Is that a comment on their overall quality and durability?

 

Just for my own enlightenment....

 

CarolAnn

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The Oliver along with Bigfoot, Casita, Scamp, Escape, etc. are commonly referred to as molded fiberglass trailers. There are other fiberglass trailers that use sheets of fiberglass over framing made of a variety of materials, wood and aluminum being the most common. The Eco, Fun Finder are examples of the this type. I suppose all travel trailers can be broken down into two basic types, molded fiberglass and framed or stick built. That's my understanding for what it's worth.

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CarolAnn,

 

Many times I have seen that genre of trailer refered to as "Stick and Tin"


Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

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Yes, those other trailers are FRAME trailers, and can have about any suitable materials used as the exterior. The frame members (studs) are usually made of wood or aluminum. The molded fiberglass trailers require no studs and should be lighter, more reliable, and longer lasting, as they have no fasteners to rust and come loose and require no molding that often comes loose on other trailers.

 

One of the primary benefits of a molded fiberglass trailers can be, and hopefully IS, they are designed to minimize wind drag, much like the famous Airstream trailers that have an aluminum skin attached to frame construction (expensive construction method).

 

I've never owned a molded fiberglass RV but I have owned several canoes with that construction. I look forward to getting and using my new Oliver. It should be aerodynamic and save a lot of fuel, as compared to most frame construction trailers with a lot of 90 degree corners on the outside. Maybe some day they will offer a molded kevlar construction, but that would increase the price considerably, but lower the weight considerably.

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And, quite possibly, be bulletproof as well..... :o


Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

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Another thing that we found about "stickie" units, is that if you camp on the lake a lot, with the windows open at night, the veneer on the panneling will start to peel off ! :shock:


I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth 08' Oliver Legacy Elite HULL NUMBER 0003(sold)

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Molded fiberglass trailers seem to last and last with minimal care. Go to the Molded Fiberglas RV site and you will see many lovingly restored fiberglass eggs of all makes, models and years! At most fiberglass trailer rallies I've attended, there is normally an "open house" time for folks to show off their restorations or modifications or the latest model. I've also noticed that friendlier and more knowledgeable people own fiberglass trailers and are more willing to share ideas. JMHO, Chuck

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I've noticed that most fiberglass trailers seem to last and last, and they seem to hold their value. This is certainly true with Casitas, and I am hoping that Oliver will prove the same.

 

The older used stick-built trailers I've seen tend to be in rather sad shape and they tend to be offered for sale dirt chip. Older Casitas I've seen tend to still be rock solid.

 

It seems that fiberglass just tends to last longer.

 

The Oliver's aluminum frame should add to the longevity too.

 

If you want a trailer that will last you five years and then you plan to donate it for a tax writeoff, get a stick built. If you want something that will last, get fiberglass or an Airstream.

 

- Chris

 

PS: My Tab for sale has a hybrid stick-style and "Alufiber" (aluminum and fiberglass combined) construction, and it has a totally awesome aluminum frame. If you want something a bit cheaper than an Oliver - take a look at the link in my signature... :-)

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Thanks for the info, Techno. Your T@B is as handsome as can be. However, my biggest, strongest, most significant, can't-do-without-it option is a great bathroom. Gotta have that! Everything else comes after.

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