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Anyone use Timbrens on an F150?

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The rear suspension on our F150 Raptor is going to need a bit of help when towing the Ollie.  I'm thinking about installing a set of Timbrens as a stop gap until I know exactly what I want to do back there.  Does anyone have any experience with them on an F150, particularly on an FX4 since that has about the same amount of suspension lift as the Raptor.  I'm curious how much sag to expect and what the ride is like both with and without the trailer.  I've heard that they can be pretty harsh.

 

Thanks!


Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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This may be helpful in Timbrens experience but not F150.  I have a Silverado 1500 4x4 Z-71 and towed our Elite II across country with stock suspension.  After putting on the Timbrens, a very easy process, I was very pleased with the improvement in hitch height change and overall performance.  The vertical movement of the trailer hitch when under way is greatly reduced and ride quality in the truck is significantly improved.  I do not feel the ride is harsh just much more stabile than with stock suspension.  With the trailer disconnected there is about 3/4" clearance between the Timbrens and the frame cushion stops and you don't have any change to stock suspension until putting the big load on the hitch.  I am glad that I chose them for the loaded suspension improvement, the simplicity of installation, and being able to just use them with no required maintaining or adjusting.

 

George

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George and Gretchen


Gig Harbor, Wa.


Hull Number 178

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Thanks George - good to hear that you like them.


Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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I have no direct experience,  but the Land Cruiser guys really like the SOFT Timbrens, read here.

 

https://forum.ih8mud.com/threads/timbren-front-and-rear-bump-stops.478192/

 

Good luck. I am hoping I don't need airbags since I love the soft cushy OEM ride of my 2013 LC and don't want to mess it up (or the wonderful rear articulation) ... why are Timbrens so darned expensive? There is about $5 worth of material in a $300 kit!

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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That's interesting - I didn't know that they could be had in different compounds.  The rears only for the F150 are about $250, which when compared to a $1,200 set of progressive springs or the $1,600 pneumatic bump stops that some Raptor owners use, they're downright cheap.  I think that a set of upgraded springs is the ultimate solution, but before spending that sort of money I need to have both the truck and trailer so that I can weigh everything, see how much sag I need to correct, etc so that I can get the springs made to the right spec.  At the same time, I think that I need something back there for picking up the trailer and our first trip, and the Timbrens seem like a good solution for that.


Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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FWIW, the Timbren bump stops are worth the $.   I have had them on the front and rear of my 100-Series Landcruiser for years and can vouch for their performance and durability.   I also have 2.5" diameter Radflo (similar to Fox, King, etc.) shocks on the rear and when towing I increase the nitrogen pressure (from 200psi to 400psi) to not only help with supporting the increased hitch weight but also to correspondingly increase the damping.

 

After trying inner coil spring air bags, which provide additional spring rate, the difference was night/day with regard to additional control from the additional control via shock damping.

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I also have 2.5″ diameter Radflo (similar to Fox, King, etc.) shocks on the rear and when towing I increase the nitrogen pressure (from 200psi to 400psi) to not only help with supporting the increased hitch weight but also to correspondingly increase the damping. After trying inner coil spring air bags, which provide additional spring rate, the difference was night/day with regard to additional control from the additional control via shock damping.

Do you mind telling us how you adjust the N2 pressure? Do you carry a small high pressure bottle, and do you think that is safe? Could you use regular 140 psi compressed air from your OBA system through a dryer, and an aviation strut pump?

 

https://bogertaviation.com/products/15x-strut-pump

 

I'm having a really hard time imagining how this adjustment could be done away from your shop.....

 

Thanks.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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