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routlaw

DC to AC inverter?

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Thinking about installing one of the 12V Inverters into my Ollie, should have had this done during the build but thats another discussion. So for those that have opted for either the 600 or 2000 watt system where is the best place to mount this inside the camper? Are you happy with where the folks at Oliver installed it?

 

Ideally I would like to do this with as few drill holes as possible and so that its out of the way and not an intrusion into most of the living space. Perhaps under the dining table, and near the breaker panels? I'm open for other ideas though.

 

Thanks

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An inverter was not an option when we bought our trailer so I installed one myself.  I went with a Kisae SWXFR 1220.  It is true sine-wave, has a remote display module with on/off switch and a built in transfer switch.  They also have a top notch tech support.  I mounted it on top of the wheel well behind the cupboard on the street side of the trailer.  The top of the wheel well in front of the cupboard on the street side is where I mounted our Progressive Industries Surge Protector.

 

For an inverter install there are several additional pieces you may want to add: 4/0 wire, lugs for the wire, tool to crimp lugs, heat shrink tubing, fuse, fuse holder, cut off switch, etc.  I also added a 110 volt 2 breaker sub panel.

 

We have enjoyed the added versatility of having the inverter.


Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

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If I could do it over I would opt for 3000 watt inverter, but that's due to running the AC on battery.  When you do the installation be sure to make it easy to access the readout as well as the connections and plugs.  Mine is under the dinette seat closest to the larder and I have to put my head into the seat well to read it.  I agree with Steve that there are several parts and a change in wiring that make it work so a trip to AM solar may be good if you are camping in the Northwest.

 

Our inverter has become an essential part of camping and allows us to use an induction cooktop, toaster oven, microwave, 110v lamp, cube heater, and AC.  Would not want to be without it.

 

 

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Current 2007 Airstream Classic Limited 31


2015 Oliver Legacy Elite II (Sold)


2016 Ram 2500 HD 6.7i Cummins turbo diesel


 

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Steve I have to hand it to you, you're never one for taking short cuts. So just for clarity though it appears you mounted your inverter out of sight and in the basement so to speak while implementing yet an additional breaker panel perhaps with 110 outlets for your AC elec needs? From your description it seems the inverter is not easily accessible, correct? Where was the 110 breaker panel installed? And is a surge protector really that necessary for someone who rarely if ever uses shore power?

 

Thanks Dave, doubt we would ever need 3000 watt as our AC has never been used, but your comment regarding location are what I've been struggling with too. Effectively I don't see an ideal place to install one of these things and having a short run of cable to solar/battery mains seems sensible regardless of AWG wiring.

 

Much to consider.

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Steve I have to hand it to you, you’re never one for taking short cuts. So just for clarity though it appears you mounted your inverter out of sight and in the basement so to speak while implementing yet an additional breaker panel perhaps with 110 outlets for your AC elec needs? From your description it seems the inverter is not easily accessible, correct? Where was the 110 breaker panel installed? And is a surge protector really that necessary for someone who rarely if ever uses shore power?

 

....

 

Much to consider.

 

Rob, you are indeed correct that the inverter is not easily accessible.  On the other hand, it's not necessary to access it for any reason other than to work on it.  In fact since I installed it in January, yesterday was the first time I've been back to it (I moved my shunt closer to it.)

 

The 12vdc positive wire comes in from the right side and goes directly to the Switch. From there it continues thru the fuse and on to the positive terminal of the inverter.

 

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I mounted the detachable remote display and switch on the opposite side of the coach right above my bed.

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A surge protector offers nothing to the boon-dockers.

 

 

 

 

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Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

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Was out yesterday, it was my b'day, so Trudi and I did an epic hike and bagged Blackmore Peak in the Hyalite Range south of town. Approximately 12 miles RT, almost 4,000 elevation gain up to 10,154 feet. We were whipped by the end of it, thus the delayed response.

 

But I'm still confused yet on your setup, though it looks like you've done a stellar job of installation.

 

Whats not clear to me is how, where you get your AC outlets? Normally the inverter itself provides a couple but then yours is hidden from access. Did you somehow find a way of wiring the existing AC outlets already installed in the Ollie to provide your inverted 110 V @ AC needs, or did you install additional outlets (fed by the inverter) which are dedicated to the inverter only. If neither I'm really confused then.

 

Thanks for the pics and explanation.

 

BTW, why is it that my "thanks" to peoples post do not show up, yet more confusion for a different discussion.

 

 

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...Whats not clear to me is how, where you get your AC outlets? Normally the inverter itself provides a couple but then yours is hidden from access. Did you somehow find a way of wiring the existing AC outlets already installed in the Ollie to provide your inverted 110 V @ AC needs, or did you install additional outlets (fed by the inverter) which are dedicated to the inverter only. If neither I’m really confused then. Thanks for the pics and explanation. BTW, why is it that my “thanks” to peoples post do not show up, yet more confusion for a different discussion.

 

Happy belated birthday, 12 miles round trip, 4000 feet of gain, and you were only WHIPPED, I would have been dead long before that hike was over.    WOW, I'm impressed.

 

OK, back to the issue at hand and I apologize for not addressing the AC side of the install.  Earlier, I stated the reasons for choosing the Kisae SWXFR 1220. "It is true sine-wave, has a remote display module with on/off switch and a built in transfer switch."  Two other important aspects I completely failed to mention is the capability for it to be hardwired and the fact that it can handle two independent 110 volt circuits, one of which is GFCI protected.

 

Our Oliver has nine 110 volt outlets.  The factory wired them on two 20 amp circuits.  Their locations are: Outside, the Microwave, the Fridge, over the galley, beneath the dinette, one over the head of each bed, one in the rear upper cabinet and one in the basement.  The way I wired the inverter for 110 volts was to remove each group of outlets from their breaker in the distribution panel.  I then replaced one of the 20 amp breakers with a 30 amp.  I fed the power to the inverter from that 30 amp breaker.  I fed each circuit inside the inverter to the breaker sub panel you see in the pictures.  Then, I simply reattached the original wires going to each group of outlets to the two 20 amp breakers in the sub panel.  This way there was NO new wiring to run, just move it from the old location (distribution panel) to the new (breaker sub panel.)

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Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

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How much heat is generated by these big units under heavy load, and is it necessary to supply good ventilation? Does the output automatically reduce if it gets too warm?

 

I have found this thread to be very interesting.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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How much heat is generated by these big units under heavy load, and is it necessary to supply good ventilation? Does the output automatically reduce if it gets too warm? I have found this thread to be very interesting. John Davies Spokane WA

 

John, as you can see, once everything is buttoned up I can't see the inverter.  We used it extensively this past Winter (mid January to early April) out in the deserts of the Southwest and had no problems with it.  The inverter has two fans built in that apparently run when or if needed (they're not on constantly.)  The heaviest load we put on it was the microwave and I suspect that, with the exception of trumpetguy running his A/C, this would be case for everybody else as well.  I would expect that if the unit gets too warm it would shut off rather than have a reduction in output as that might damage something downstream of the inverter.

 

An interesting side note is that I have a small 110 volt lamp sitting on the nightstand.  It has no larger than a 40 watt bulb.  Turning it on draws 0.1 amp also contains the overhead for the inverter.  Turning on one of the LED lights draws 0.2 amps!  Go figure.


Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

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