Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hey, folks. QQ about something I've noticed this weekend...

If I run the overhead fan in exhaust mode (while cooking on the range top, for instance) with the AC running I notice a smell that I will call "hot electricals". Sort of ozone-y, I guess. If I turn the exhaust fan off the smell goes away. I started pulling panels and sticking my face in the cubbies to identify the source and it does seem to be coming from the compartment with the Progressive unit. I also have the AC quickstart option on my trailer.

Now, its been ~110F here for the last few days so I expect the electrical system is working hard. I'm hooked into 50A power with dog bone adapter (not a cheap-o adapter; it appears to be pretty well made) because 1) the AC runs a lot better (no power cuts && voltage is a lot more consistent) and 2) this park definitely has spots with low voltage as confirmed by some other folks with trailers with a less robust electrical setup. I've not been out to the post with the multimeter on this trip because I've done so in the past and know that some posts are better than others.

I'm keeping a close watch on things but curious if others have had similar experience. My primary concern is cooking the compressor on the AC (low probability due to Progressive + 50A) and/or cooking the AC quickstart as I've read posts here from others about it giving off a smell when it is failing.

Thoughts?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty sure it's coming from the converter section of the Progressive PDC. Mine does this occasionally under high load like with stereo, fan, lots of lights etc. It's pretty faint and goes away when load is reduced or the batteries catch up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We've occasionally noticed the same on our previous RV (camper van), which had built in surge protection.  The smell always went away.  Vent the cabin by opening the windows; it's like turning up the radio in a car so you can't hear that funny noise under the hood 😄

Seriously, hot electrical smells are scary when you don't know the source.  Keep us posted if you find the cause.

Ray and Susan Huff

Elite II Twin "Pearl" - Hull#699; taking delivery December 7, 2020

2013 F350 3.2l diesel Super Duty 4x4 long bed crew cab

2017 Leisure Travel Van Unity Twin Bed (sold)

AZARCACOGAHIIDILKSLAMSMONENVNMOKORSCTNTX

Link to post
Share on other sites

That Progressive Dynamics Power Converter has a cooling fan on it. Have you heard it running?

 

CFE04F36-7640-4C45-B3D7-B35628CCAC33.jpeg

Edited by Townesw
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Bill and Martha

2018 LEII Hull 313

2019 Chevrolet 2500HD Duramax with a custom Turboencabulator modification 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Townesw said:

That Progressive Dynamics Power Converter has a cooling fan on it.

Good point. A bad fan was my initial thought. The set point on thermostatic switch must be pretty high though. I only notice it coming on if the batteries are down a bit after a long run, and when the temperature inside the trailer hasn't yet cooled down. The odor can occur whether the fan comes on or not.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You do know that a dog bone adapter reduces the 50 amp two (2) 120V lines to one (1) 120V line with no more than 30 amps (probably less)? Maybe the pedestal with a 50 amp outlet is newer and wired with the proper wire, breakers, and connectors? That would explain less voltage drop and surges. Surges are usually a system under stress, ie: under size wire, larger loads than the system was designed for, poor maintenance on the busses and breakers, or even the supplier unable to provide amble supply. A single 120V 30 amp line will usually run the AC when operating in high heat, and the AC only. Look at what the starting and operating current requirements are. Refrigerator should be on propane. No other electrical loads except maybe a few LED lights and maybe a TV.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/7/2020 at 5:17 PM, bhncb said:

Good point. A bad fan was my initial thought. The set point on thermostatic switch must be pretty high though. I only notice it coming on if the batteries are down a bit after a long run, and when the temperature inside the trailer hasn't yet cooled down. The odor can occur whether the fan comes on or not.  

 

The same here. I've only noticed that fan kicking on when the batteries are charging. It did *not* kick on when the temp was up above 100F.

Now that the temp has dropped (thanks to clouds/smoke) I've not been noticing the smell. I will keep an eye on it though.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/7/2020 at 6:59 PM, Mainiac said:

You do know that a dog bone adapter reduces the 50 amp two (2) 120V lines to one (1) 120V line with no more than 30 amps (probably less)? Maybe the pedestal with a 50 amp outlet is newer and wired with the proper wire, breakers, and connectors? That would explain less voltage drop and surges. Surges are usually a system under stress, ie: under size wire, larger loads than the system was designed for, poor maintenance on the busses and breakers, or even the supplier unable to provide amble supply. A single 120V 30 amp line will usually run the AC when operating in high heat, and the AC only. Look at what the starting and operating current requirements are. Refrigerator should be on propane. No other electrical loads except maybe a few LED lights and maybe a TV.

 

 

Yes, that's right. This particular park was built back in the early 70s. I suspect the 50A circuits are quite a bit newer. The park is also sort of sorted into 30A and 50A sections and I suspect the 50A section got a bit more design consideration. I guess it'd be interesting to plug into 30A on the post in a 50A section and compare the voltage versus that coming from the 50A plug and through the dog bone.

Over the last year or so I've noticed that the scenario I've described is pretty common at many other parks as well...if I'm plugged into 30A the AC kicks off so frequently that its basically not effective but if I dogbone into 50A all is good.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When given a choice between a 30 or 50, I always check the condition of the receptacles and use the better one, or the 50 if it's a tossup.  50s generally provide a better connection and will induce less voltage loss under load. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/7/2020 at 6:59 PM, Mainiac said:

You do know that a dog bone adapter reduces the 50 amp two (2) 120V lines to one (1) 120V line with no more than 30 amps (probably less)? Maybe the pedestal with a 50 amp outlet is newer and wired with the proper wire, breakers, and connectors? That would explain less voltage drop and surges. Surges are usually a system under stress, ie: under size wire, larger loads than the system was designed for, poor maintenance on the busses and breakers, or even the supplier unable to provide amble supply. A single 120V 30 amp line will usually run the AC when operating in high heat, and the AC only. Look at what the starting and operating current requirements are. Refrigerator should be on propane. No other electrical loads except maybe a few LED lights and maybe a TV.

 

A problem with the electrical supply should be detected by the onboard surge protector?  Does it appear to be working?  See if there are any error codes.  It should report historical errors, even if an error has been corrected, until the power is disconnected.  At least this is the way the Progressive Industries surge protector worked in our Leisure Travel Van.  Any current, under or over threshold set by surge protector will cut off power.

Edited by Susan Huff

Ray and Susan Huff

Elite II Twin "Pearl" - Hull#699; taking delivery December 7, 2020

2013 F350 3.2l diesel Super Duty 4x4 long bed crew cab

2017 Leisure Travel Van Unity Twin Bed (sold)

AZARCACOGAHIIDILKSLAMSMONENVNMOKORSCTNTX

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/11/2020 at 9:33 PM, nrvale0 said:

 

Yes, that's right. This particular park was built back in the early 70s. I suspect the 50A circuits are quite a bit newer. The park is also sort of sorted into 30A and 50A sections and I suspect the 50A section got a bit more design consideration. I guess it'd be interesting to plug into 30A on the post in a 50A section and compare the voltage versus that coming from the 50A plug and through the dog bone.

Over the last year or so I've noticed that the scenario I've described is pretty common at many other parks as well...if I'm plugged into 30A the AC kicks off so frequently that its basically not effective but if I dogbone into 50A all is good.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...