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Mainiac

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Everything posted by Mainiac

  1. Richard...outside, and clear of flammable items: I have tried a little gasoline in a triggered oil can. Once you have identified the carburetor, spray just a little gas into the top opening of the carb. This is assuming you have spark. I have been lucky a couple of times by doing this that the engine sucks enough fresh gas on it's own to start and run. I have to say that I agree a new carb is the easiest and least frustrating solution. It sure teaches you to use a gas storage solution at the end of the season, and then drain the gas to boot. Glad you got it free.
  2. Same batteries used in golf carts. In Maine you get a $10 trade in credit for each battery...
  3. Is it true Seadawg? 14 years with an Oliver? They should trade you the new model for $1?? And put yours in the RV Hall of Fame....
  4. I also carry the "fancy" tape. I have used it to fix different things,, at campsites, for fellow campers. However, when "fixing" the umbilicalcord/plug connection I will stick with electrical tape. We put a small amount of silicone caulk around the seam and then double wrap about 4" of the tape. I have found the "cheap" tape forms a more rigid connection outboard of the outlet, allows the cord to gently bend down, keeps the connection secure, and last for a long long time. I have noticed the the newer units have a cord that exits at a 45° or so to minimize the problem (and broken plastic on the sockets). Dump trailers, boat trailers, and other objects in a salt water environment have proven its vaue. Just know that a standard product, that works, is an acceptable item to use...
  5. But wait a minute! My Ollie is the only RV I have ever owned, which also makes it the best RV I have ever owned! So maybe I’ll just keep it, warts and all. well done. Well stated. Reflects the feelings of the majority of us owners that are out there. To us our Oliver is like a hammer to a carpenter. A tool to get the job done. Not an object that has become a central reason for our very existence. Again, "Well Done".
  6. The question fridge is only 2 way, we use the 3 way features all the time. Dc underway, AC at CG, propane off the grid. Current refrigerator size is adequate for our needs, as long as we rotate in beverage needs each night for the following day. Better half says micro too high for anyone to safely use. Wouldn't want to lose cabinet space either...
  7. I have "repaired" cords like this before. I keep a small tube of GE Silicone in the tool box. A small amount should do it. Then I wrap the area with plastic electrical tape. The tape is warm and pulled tight. It stretches a little and seals real tight. I go from the plug down the cord about three inches and at least three times. A molded on plug, even exposed a little as shown, is more water tight than a replacement plug.
  8. We used Banana Banners, out of Bowdoin, Maine, as well as a few others. Talked to her, gave her an idea what we wanted. She showed us a picture, with some improvements. Gave the approval, and received the graphic in a tube. After pick-up, at a campsite, it took longer to clean the area with denatured alcohol than to apply the graphic. No bubbles, no problems. Impressed me as it is a compound curved area.
  9. Order a set onlne. $39.99. Works great, solar powered, and do not need a repeater...
  10. It is a lot warmer Maine, right now, than in Tennessee. Also there is a whole lot less snow too. Hope our luck holds out...!
  11. Enjoy the warmth. Just know we are looking for our first "plowable" snow this weekend. And it should stay around for a white Christmas. Look into staying at Kissimmee Praire Preserve State Park once. Eleven miles in, washboard dirt road, alligators and deer everywhere. What you won't see is any light pollution. Red lights at bathouse so as not to kill your night vision. No neon lights or big plastic faces. The Milky Way and stars just seem to jump off the sky. There are even more stars than you can see in New Harbor on a cold February night. Be safe out there...
  12. Hull #211 (2017 model [April pickup] ordered in Nov 2016 had a full size spare. My spare tire and rim matched the other 4 Michelins, at my insistence, as they were using up the last of the Goodyear tires with rims. Think the prior rims were different too. My upper cabinet doors are frosted by choice, with black and mirrored as options. My tv is mounted on the curbside, as they had not yet gotten permission from RVAC(?) to potentially block the escape hatch window. (If I drop shipped a mount and tv they would have centrally installed). My drawers are self closing, but will open on bumpy roads. (Retro fitted with a thin bungee after). The manual awning works just great, one less thing to go wrong. Keyed lock, as the keyless were having to be drilled out occasionally. Guess they must be a lot better now as haven't heard lately any problems.
  13. Don't forget to add antifreeze to the sinks and shower drains. Hard to blow them out. We do the blow out first, twice. Then we use the antifreeze. When taking off in the real cold weather, we do not de-winterize until south of the Mason Dixon line. We carry a case of water in the tow vehicle, and transfer it to the Oliver when the furnace is turned on. We use RV antifreeze to flush with. We usually have 3 extra gallons in the closet as it seems harder to find once out of Maine...
  14. When everyone Is thinking about how the furnace is getting it's intake air, keep this in mind. There are built in drains in the outer hull. If you block off the furnace cold air return in any way I am sure some that some air will come In those holes. And in some circumstances that air could be quite 'chilly'. Don't think I have ever counted them, but they are visible from underneath hidden by SS caps. At one time the thought had crossed my mind that the whole space around the inner hull could be pressurized by conditioned air, but the emergency drains would be compromised. Then thoughts about elimination of the present AC, and maybe a heat pump came to mind. However, for the present, we are more than pleased how the system now seems more balanced with the high wall vent. It functions very well, and we can keep that door closed...
  15. We put a matching SS vent on the inside. You see screw heads outside, double nuts inside.
  16. Our Progressive EMS system has a 'lifetime' replacement warranty, and it DOES monitor low power. It will shut off power to the camper. When power is restored to enough voltage it monitors for a while and then allows power to our unit. This feature is especially important in older CG, during peak usage or brownouts. Inconvenience, but better than replacing "stuff" on my nickel...
  17. We only have the Progressive external, as an EMS wasn't an option when we ordered our unit (2017 hull #211). After reading the forum, as the internal ones became an option, I was glad ours was outside. We could plug into the pedestal and see immediately whether or not it was safe to plug in the Olver. Those with the internal would have to go inside to see if all of as good. If I did, at some point, convert to an internal, I would add a remote readout somewhere (maybe the basement) so I wouldn't have to go around. The only trouble with the external that we have heard about is the moving light (status codes), giving people walking by to get curious. The solution sometimes is to put a small piece of electrical tape over the display. We do, ALWAYS, use a small cable lock to secure the EMS to the pedistal, so it doesn't get "borrowed". The cable lock we use is a pistol safety cable, so it is tough.
  18. The solar has worked for us. And does stopping at a college or university park count as boondocking? Yup. Great wifi, usually good tv reception to get the local weather, and no traffic noise. Hull #211 likes getting off the interstates (they all look alike), and seeing some of the nices places and people. You do have to have a bunch of referral cards though, people will line up to ask about the Oliver...
  19. I bet it would be possible to put the microwave in your unit. However, there certainly would be challenges. High Pointe makes a variety of units. The question is would you be happy with the final appearance? I believe the unit requires a deeper 'hole' so that you would have to build out an adapter plate on the front to hide the hole cutout. Also it would have to be strong enough so the micro doesn't float out going down the road. Also I wonder if additional supports would be required inside the hole and how that would be secured?Then there is the question of whether or not your batteries can provide enough power when boondocking. Maybe it would be time to trade your unit in for a new one?
  20. We have had about a 1/2" of ice and 18 to 24" of snow on top of that here in Maine. The solar was STILL charging. We have waded down through waist high snow, on occasion, to clean it off. We use a foam "roof rake" type device and it works quite well. We find it all slides off easily, except maybe in around the ac. Maybe my imagination but it seems the dark solar panels melt anything on them and of course the wind up there scours anything else...
  21. We waited and waited. That was five years ago. Time flies! Spend the time looking where you might want to go. Go to each state and look for their camper guide and order one. The maps are great and the pictures will show you the prettiest spots and pictures are probably miles from the Interstate. After all, the reason you ordered an Oliver was to get off the Interstate?
  22. Should be easy to see one, as there are close to 20 in Maine, a few less in each of the other NE states. Just know that most in this area are either winterized or on the road heading south. You know if there are that many around here they must be adapted well to "cool" climates, narrow roads, small older camping areas, and narrow city streets. Those that are winterized are still easy to see. Just turn on the propane, start the furnace, and turn on the lights. Everything except running water will work...
  23. Welcome from Maine. Waiting and reading the forum you will be tempted to start gathering "stuff". Take it easy. You will be tempted to store it in a spare room. Don't, there is more room in a garage or small barn, lol. We have been up and down the eastern seaboard and the Mississippi River a few times in the last five years. And a few boondocking trips too. Each time we get home we evaluate items we haven't used, and see if we really need to be carrying it. We carry quite a few pounds less every trip. (What we did find was that there are stores all over the USA). We actually have three overhead cabinets that are almost empty, and room in the closet. We eat well, travel light, and stop often. Stay off the interstates as they almost all look a like. Come to a stop sign and flip a coin, tails to the left, heads to the right. That has lead to some of the best sights. Oh, and carry a good set of maps. Garmins usually lead to big crowds... See you around a campfire...
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