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MarkC

Blocking stabilizers and wheels for the newbie

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I have more greenhorn questions.  When leveling, do you use the 3 stabilizers to level or wheel blocks to level.  Or maybe both.  People have mentioned using blocks under the stabilizers. I'm assuming the shoes on the stabilizers sink in on softer ground .  What dimensions, differ for front and rear, how many for height adjustment?   What about wheel blocks?   Seen an array on line, confusing.  Any favorites? What about material...wood or plastic?  Seems like making your own out wood would be simple and cheap. Though,  there is always the rot factor.  So many decisions, but that's half the fun!

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Here is what we do and use to level our Elite II.

 

Use the rear stabilizers only to fine-tune the leveling.

 

First use Andersen Levelers to level the trailer side to side as precisely as possible. With a little practice, these make leveling very easy: One just rolls up on them until the side-to-side leveling is reached. We place this Stanley I-Beam Level on the bumper to determine that side-to-side leveling.

 

Once the side-to-side leveling is the best you can do using the Andersen Levelers, use these Camco Wheel Chocks on the trailer's wheels on the opposite side of the trailer.

 

Use these (no more than four)  Tri-Lynx Levelers with these Tri-Lynx Caps under all three stabilizers. Here are the advantage of using these: 1) It reduces the time and energy used to raise and lower the stabilizers. 2) It provides a wider base for the stabilizers so that they don't dig into the earth or damage any surface under them. 3) If you forget to raise the stabilizers before moving the trailer, you have less of a chance of damaging them.

 

Use the I-beam level to check the front-back level of your trailer. We have discovered that placing the level above the top refrigerator vent, using the handle to secure it, gives us a good indication of front-back level, which we have ascertained by the way a dog leash hangs from a hook and the way the bathroom door will stay open at a 45-degree angle--not swinging towards the fully open or closed position. You may find some other surface a better place to put the level on your own trailer. (The floor does not seem to be a good place on our trailer.)

 

You can fine-tune the side-to-side leveling with the stabilizers. I am a bit of a perfectionist, so I often go back and forth with lowering and raising all three stabilizers before I am satisfied with the final leveling.

 

Use this Camco Wheel Stop-Stabilizer to increase your trailer's stability.

 

I hope our method and suggestions help. I'm sure that others have different methods that work just as well for them.

 

 

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Onward through the Fog!


EarthPicks of Cochise County


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Thanks for the helpful info! So nice to be able to click and see exactly what you are talking about and where to purchase those items.  I'm going to talk with my kids on their next visit on how to insert internet sites when you email.  Very helpful! Thanks again!

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MarkC -

 

Absolutely nothing wrong with Spike's suggestions.  The Andersen levelers are really easy even when you are alone.  However, be prepared for a bit of sticker shock as they are not inexpensive.  I think that one or two other companies are now making what are basically knock-offs of the Andersens, but, I have not seen them in person and therefore could not judge the quality - the Andersens are guaranteed.

 

I also carry the "lego" type blocks that Spike mentions.  But, I've found that I tend to use the wood blocks in the picture below more often than the legos.  These do not have to be "stacked" since they are one piece.  If you cut these right at 11 inches tall, they will fit nicely under your rear jacks while on a level or stern (rear of the Ollie) elevated surface.  If the stern is lower than the front then I just lay the block on its side for what is about 5 1/2 inches of height.  And, if you keep your eyes open around construction sites, you can pick up scrap pieces of 6 x 6 lumber free.

 

Bill

 

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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We also use wood blocks for reducing travel on the jacks. But, just chunks of 2 x 6 or 2 x 8 cutoffs, stacked as needed.

Have a little envy of those nice blocks others carry.

We don't varnish, glue up or laminate. When they get old, we chuck pthem or burn them, and replace with new project cutoffs.

 

??

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2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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We’ve tried several methods. We started using scrap 2X6 pieces for leveling and under the jacks. Here’s what we’ve settled on:

 

We use the front jack to level front to back. The back jacks are for fine tuning left and right. We bought two sets of the yellow lego’s (12” square) at Walmart. There are 10 in each set. I also made some blocks out of 2X6 lumber, much like Bill pictured above. If we aren’t level left to right we use the legos under the tires to get near level. Then we stack legos under the back jacks so that the wood blocks are just an inch or so below the jack, same for the front jack. We usually don’t have to have more than a few inches of jack travel. It’s quick and easy. The plastic isn’t affected by water and keeps the wood up off the ground.

 

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Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram Rebel 4X4 5.7L Hemi

ALAZARCACOFLGAIDILKSKYLAMDMSMOMTNENVNMNYNCNDOHOKSCSDTNTXUTVAWVWYsm.jpg

 

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Hi Mike and Carol, First off, thanks for responding to my post!  After looking at the photo on your post, I was wondering if you use blocks on your tires? Or maybe not just in this case, on a concrete pad.  Is having the trailer supported just on the 3 jacks enough. Or do you need a block under the tire and even that tire locking device to stabilize. I guess I'm wondering if the rule is to level by using blocks under the 3 jacks, and block the tires and use thst tire lock device.  Or is that too extreme?  I'm thinking that when trailering less is more, keep the weight down and gear down.  But, don't know.  Want to be safe but don't want to pack a bunch of unnecessary gear. Thanks again for your help!

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I'm a bit budget conscious and like the 2 X 6 cut offs to reduce the travel needed of the three jacks and for leveling.  Cut a bunch of them out of treated lumber to fill a milk crate.  I think I have two stacks of 6 in mine.  I carry them in a milk crate up front in the aluminum box.  I recommend the very heavy rubber wheel chocks from Harbor Freight.  They are inexpensive and are very durable, and fit in front of the milk crate.

 

Many of use use the jacks to level Ollie.  Only need IMHO for under wheel blocking is on sloping ground so I don't carry any.  At times on reasonable slopes the high side may only have a block and the low side a bunch with the low side wheels not loaded much at all.  Then raise the low side up to take up the extra slack in height and then run the two jacks together to lift together keeping the trailer sort of level.  This avoids some of the twisting the frame.

 

For soft ground,  to reduce sinking I use two 2 X 6's laid side to side, then stack more under the jacks at a 90 degree angle single file.  I do the same up front at times.

 

 


Tug:  2019 F-150 SuperCrew Lariat, 3.5L EcoBoost, Max Trailer Tow, FX-4, 4X4, Rear Locker


http://visitedstatesmap.com/maps/ARCACOIDKSKYNENVNCOKORTNTXUTVAWYmed/visitedstatesmap.php


 


 

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[postquote quote=176265][/postquote]

That’s a great question, I should have explained why my tires aren’t chocked - at this site we were just overnighting and I did not have to unhitch from the truck. You can see in the picture my Andersen chains are still tight.  Before I unhitch at a site we always chock the tires. Both sides. Also, if I have to drive up on legos, the standard wedge type chocks aren’t as effective so I have one of those “between the tires” or x-chock devices. Some are quite expensive. I got the inexpensive Camco plastic one that works fine. Another Walmart item. You can see them in this photo:

 

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Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram Rebel 4X4 5.7L Hemi

ALAZARCACOFLGAIDILKSKYLAMDMSMOMTNENVNMNYNCNDOHOKSCSDTNTXUTVAWVWYsm.jpg

 

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