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Geronimo John

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Geronimo John last won the day on May 20 2020

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My Info

  • Gender or Couple
    Couple

My RV or Travel Trailer

  • Do you own an Oliver Travel Trailer, other travel trailer or none?
    I own an Oliver Travel Trailer
  • Year
    2018
  • Make
    Oliver
  • Model
    Legacy Elite II
  • Floor Plan
    Twin Bed Floor Plan
  • Hull #
    342

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  1. What a PITA wet bedding during a boondock trip can be! This past week, I also encountered what appears to be the same problem as yours. With the help of my daughter (Allison), we were able quickly fix our two leakers without spending a dime. The first one took us an hour to figure it out. The fix took ten seconds. The second window had the same issue, and also took another ten seconds to also fix. Not saying it may be the same as your problem, but it is darn sure worth a 30 second look see! In the below picture you will note the +/- 2 ½” gap in the operable window bottom track & water diverter (TWD). The TWD is a black track that extends under both the operable and fixed windows. It is about ½” wide, and has holes drilled through the material for water passage and seals against the sides of the aluminum window frame. This seal conveys water that has gotten past the flanks of the operable window, and ports the water down to the window weeps. An important function of this black thing is to distribute water flowing from the operable window side of the track to the weeps of that the sealed window weeps. As the picture shows, this section of the TWD has slid forward, allowing all the water to flow to only the weeps of the operable widow. Use a pair of needle nose plyers, or a similar sized tool, and push the TWD back to the rear to meet the section from the back window edge. Then close the window and spray water onto the side of the trailer and observe if your flooding issue has been corrected.
  2. What a PITA wet bedding during a boondock trip can be! This past week, I also encountered what appears to be the same problem as yours. With the help of my daughter (Allison), we were able quickly fix our two leakers without spending a dime. The first one took us an hour to figure it out. The fix took ten seconds. The second window had the same issue, and also took another ten seconds to also fix. Not saying it may be the same as your problem, but it is darn sure worth a 30 second look see! In the below picture you will note the +/- 2 ½” gap in the operable window bottom track & water diverter (TWD). The TWD is a black track that extends under both the operable and fixed windows. It is about ½” wide, and has holes drilled through the material for water passage and seals against the sides of the aluminum window frame. This seal conveys water that has gotten past the flanks of the operable window, and ports the water down to the window weeps. An important function of this black thing is to distribute water flowing from the operable window side of the track to the weeps of that the sealed window weeps. As the picture shows, this section of the TWD has slid forward, allowing all the water to flow to only the weeps of the operable widow. Use a pair of needle nose plyers, or a similar sized tool, and push the TWD back to the rear to meet the section from the back window edge. Then close the window and spray water onto the side of the trailer and observe if your flooding issue has been corrected. OLIVER ELITE II With Rear Curb Side Storage Compartment Access.pdf
  3. A stainless steel fender washer helps keep the rope on the nail. To remove, I use a piece of cord and loop it around the nail. Pulls out easily. I really only have three as that's all I need for my OEII patio cover. Total cost under $3, and they seem to have a lifetime warranty.... unless I lose it. 🙂 I don't carry a heavy hammer. If the ground is rocky, a rock works nicely. Cave Man style!
  4. @wdking4: Please search the Forum for Towing with a Toyota Sequoia 4.7L from the 2018/2019 time frame. Same thoughts you have were mine back then. The advice Mr. Davies provided was spot on. My Sequoia did fine on flat land. But mountains it put me in the right lane, at times in low gear. As every summer is a repeat, I upgraded to 2019 F-150 3.5 Eco Boost. Yes you can tow a OEII with a Tacoma... as long as you keep your speeds reasonable and on flat land. I strongly recommend you not take it to real mountains as your TV does not have the weight, brakes or power to do so safely. If you want more details, kindly PM me. Geronimo John
  5. Ok a relook at my OE2 and Anderson with respect to safety chains. With the two large WDH chains installed to the plate, which is part of the Anderson Receiver system, it would appear that we have four safety chains in effect. So long as the pin holding the system in the truck receiver stays in place. Your thoughts? Geronimo John
  6. I prefer my multipurpose, strong as nails, self defense throwing spike, the ever popular 90 cent landscape nails at Home Depot. They don't require a brass hammer, break rocks, and if lost are easily found by the next guy. And, they don't require oiling for at least 15 years! However, I have found that by wearing red sketchers they are an eye catcher. But most wise campers don't generally comment when I have half dozen of these in my nail belt.
  7. @ Patriot: Which model number Action Packer did you use? I really like your solution. Thanks for posting it.
  8. Thank you all for the above thoughts. A follow-up questions for those who HAD DURALAST, and CONVERTED to 12V AGM: Were the standard Oliver battery cables able to be reused with the new AGM 12V batteries? Are the AGM's really worth double the cost of the Lead Acid Marine Deep Cycle batteries? Thanks John
  9. My Ollie is a Spring 2018 egg. At purchase I decided to run with the standard Duralast 12V Marine Deep Cycle batteries. They are approaching their fourth season. For those with the same standard batteries, how long did yours last? I am considering going AGM, but solar is not in the cards. If you upgraded to AGM, what was necessary, and what would you recommend. Thanks Geronimo John
  10. When I was using a Toyota Sequoia as my TV, I needed all seven threads on the Anderson chains to level things out. During year two, I approached a parts store entrance where there was a significant grade change from the road. At less than 5 MPH, when my TV went nose higher, I heard noise from the trailer that caused me to stop. I saw that the Anderson chains were really really really tight. I gave them the 245 pound bounce test, they did not move at all. I backed out of the driveway, and loosened the Anderson chain nuts 4 threads and tried again. I stopped at the same place and did another bounce test. This time they could be moved just a bit. To get into the driveway, I had to loosen them to full slack. Point is that a quick grade change will increase or decrease your Anderson chain tension. If your chains are set tight enough, and you add to their load a grade change, it can be enough to damage your quick link(s).
  11. On the other hand, here is the Dexter AWG wire sizes chart. With an OEII, we would be on the 4 brakes, under 30 feet = 12 AWG. So the text book answer is 12 AWG. But I still think that 14 AWG would work very well. That said, when my time comes to replace the cable.... I'll ponder it a bit more. 🙂 For those wanting the full Dexter Service info, it may be found at: http://www.dexterpartsonline.com/files/2036913/uploaded/600-8K Complete Service Manual.pdf GJ
  12. @JRK: Here is the Dexter chart that reflects what I thought concerning amperage to their dual axle brakes:
  13. @Scribe With A Stylus: We had the 4 cylinder with the 7 speed trans. Single rear wheels. I think they were 15 PAX machines with about a 4+ foot equipment storage area in the rear. These MB vans were slated to be driven by younger coaches, mostly hauling our athletes and their gear. This setup would not be my recommendation for pulling an Oliver Elite II. Just not enough power. The sleeper recommendation for a TV on the cheap would be a Toyota Sequoia with the 5.7 L engine. I still have our 2005 with the 4.7 and towed Ollie for my first 12,000 miles or so. It needed more power. In 2019 I upgraded to a F-150 Lariat, 3.5 EcoBoost, FX4, Heavy Duty Tow Package. Now that truck is a beast! But the cost difference over a good used Sequoia 5.7 is not something that a lot of folks would want to entertain. Good luck, GJ
  14. Another preventive reason to downsize the receiver hitch on the back of Ollie is to prevent potential Darwin Award winners (idiots) from towing their jeeps behind the trailer.
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