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Geronimo John

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Everything posted by Geronimo John

  1. John: First, welcome to the Oliver Family! I need to clean up my documents, but they are 95% done. PM me with your E-mail address and I'll send you a materials list showing sourcing and costs for my entire Lithium project, as well as my edited version of pirated copies of other members many suggestions. (Galway Girl, Minnesota Ali, John Davies, Overland, etc.) I am using 2 AWG stranded premium copper cable from BatteryCablesUSA. Found them to be the best price. Also they are VERY helpful in calculation the actual voltage drop. that size cable is also what the voltage drop will be. As far as return back yes on the run both out and back. Also use high temp wire loom as likely it will be passing by your turbo's and/or exhaust at some point. For my 3.5 EB turbo area, I will also be wrapping the loom with heat shield. You want to minimize connections and also the higher resistivity of the frame. Yes, for the hull penetration, use the same method that Galway Girl documented in her report. It runs below the bathroom floor. You can see the path from under the front dinette seat. Yes on the clean up and removing all not required cabling from the battery box. GJ
  2. A With three lithiums, I am assuming you have at least 300 AH capacity. With that in mind I was wondering why you have chosen the 18 amp Victron? The incremental cost to their 30 amp one may something to consider. B. Your cable length of 30 to 35 feet warrants a re-look. For my "Little" F-150 Super Crew to OE2 will require cables ( plus and minus) ffrom battery to battery of right at 100 feet of #2 AWG. This is due to needing to run both cables battery to battery. C. The voltage loss is calculated for both the out and back length. It likely will be in the 100+ foot range for your big rig. At that length I would have concern with just using #10 AWG for 18 amps as well as the voltage loss at that distance and cable size. May want to re-look at that. Should my above thoughts actually apply to your project, the logical conclusion is that you'll be running new cable front to back. Should that be the case, with your three lithiums, I would go with the larger charger and power it up with twin AWG #4 stranded copper cables. Concerning mounting the Victron in the front dinette under seat cabinet, that is where I have posted and where I plan on mouning my 30 Amp Victron. My thoughts are that since the only time that the charger will be generating heat is when I am on the move. I will be removing the cushion and underseat storage cover to allow the heat to escape to the trailer cabin. This solution does not add to the under bed heat build-up issue mentioned above. Good luck.
  3. I have used a Tire Tracker for 4 seasons. Don't need the repeater with my OEII. Works well.
  4. Keep in mind that the approach/departure slope from the garage can substantially change the altitude of the A/C unit.
  5. I also collect the A/C condensate and use it as the FINAL rinse. Eliminates the hard water spots really well!
  6. dhaig, Best of luck and congratulations on your new Ollie. RV Antifreeze: Cheapest place I know of is Super Walmart Centers. Get three gallons as you may make a mistake or two and having the spare gallon is really nice. It's only a few bucks a gallon. It is nowhere as expensive as car/truck radiator antifreeze. Travel safe,
  7. JD: I am assuming that these tank rings are non-conductive. Would electrically isolating the tanks from the frame be a good or bad move?
  8. I have camped for a couple of weeks in 106 degree full sun with my OE2 OEM Dometic. We keep the Dometic pretty full and try not to open it up a lot. Also, we mitigate the heat for the refer by parking the trailer so the entry is on the north or NE side to keep the refer in the shade as much as possible. Some folks deploy their awning to make the shade, but we spend a lot of time away from Ollie and have concern about winds launching the awning.
  9. You must not park your trailers where I on rare occasions out of necessity I have to. Idea is to back up the trailer only as tight as you have to. If you don't have a tight spot with poor or no turning radius that's great. But sometimes stuff gets in the way and bringing the box close to the bumper is the only way to get it into the space. Going slow and watching the angle on the back-up camera can be very helpful... and several times made the difference in getting my Ollie into a tight situation. In my re-read, I failed to mention that getting out of the truck and taking a look is part and parcel with the process... when alone, or with a spotter. My bottom line is that I feel that nothing beats a "YOUR eyes on" approach first, and periodically when baking. My comment about the rear view cameras was more of a joke as I don't find them real useful (Like using my eyeballs at the hitch or rear of Ollie. The cameras are nice, but not effective enough for me to risk crunching Ollie or the TV. But for the TV and Basket issue, my F-150 tail gate camera is very effective in giving me an idea if I need to pull forward and re-adjust the angle. If the tongue is at 90 degrees to the bumper, most likely you have already damaged either your box or your bumper.
  10. I'm often alone when parking the trailer. So finding somebody that I can trust can be a challenge. My solution is to back up a bit, then stop and put my truck into reverse so that it's back-up camera shows how close I am to a Box and Bumper MMA match. Doing so also slows me down a bit so that I can also look up at my Ollie tail mounted camera that I have powered up from the parking light circuit in the attic. So if you are following me, and I turn on my trailer lights, I've got an eyeball on you! 🙂
  11. On the other hand, the tongue basket is very handy for all those goodies that are not suitable for inside Ollie. Some of the things I carry in mine are: Ground plates for three jacks 2" X 6" wood shims to reduce wear of jacks, but more importantly to give me a slip point so that if I drive off with a jack down there is a chance that I'll hear the thump before I brake the jack. I've seen this with my own eyes by other owners making that mistake. One was at OTT in the service yard! Spray Lithium Grease for my Anderson Ball Long range wasp spray and Cutter/Deep Woods bug repellant 2 gallon jerry can of gas for the generator Anderson chain and whale bone, pins and trailer lights when parked Old rag to wipe of my hands after puttzing with all of the above That said, I admit that I have a damaged left rear bumper as a result of this issue. It would be nice if Bulldog made a longer coupler. This would also eliminate the interference of the Anderson upgraded ball mount that sits just a bit higher than the ole one. Drop my F-150 tail gate and the tailgate camera and the Bulldog release lever end up saying bad words to each other. But alas Bulldog does not seem to have one. They do make a lever less release (Slide Coupler) that will resolve the tailgate/Bulldog issue, but would not fix the bumper/box issue. Any metal experts out there know if an extension could be welded onto the bulldog to fetch about 4 inches? That likely would be a lot less expensive than replacing the Oliver Aluminum behind the bulldog. Your thoughts? GJ
  12. Mossey: Thanks for the pictures! Well done. Am I correct in thinking that at the top of the photo you have power coming from the right, going to the left through a fuse block, to the Master Switch, to the B+ terminal block below? If so, what size fuse did you use? Or did you just reuse the OEM 300 amp fuse block? Thanks, GJ PS: For those looking at this same process, Blue Seas offers both a 300 and a 350 amp master switch.
  13. JD: Now that flag pole would be great for folks looking for your camp spot! Certainly would be hard to miss for someone driving by looking for you as well. Where do you store the flag pole when not in use?
  14. That would work well if you wanted to extend the antenna really high. In my case, a simpler solution, maybe less costly, but certainly more durable would be to design a frangible mount that could take a tree strike and not harm the antenna. Maybe something like this Crayola sketch. JPR Edit; Looking at it again, it may be better to angle the mount forward over the hull vs. towards the rear. Would require a different mix of fittings, but would actually be simpler to find the materials. Plumbing fittings would be 2 each 45 degree and one "T" and one 90 degree elbows that are easy to locate vs. the street "Y". Not shown are two clamps for a ground plane. Please pardon the fact that the sketch is not to scale and no dimensions are shown as I don't have access to my Ollie until next May.
  15. The guys at TFL ran the new Tundra up the Ike twice. Overall they rated the ride and cab noise as excellent and also has excellent MPG on the Ike run. I would add a very high probability of this truck also having the excellent Toyota reliability factor. My down sides are that the new Tundra appears to have much less leg room in the rear seats of the Crew Cab, a hump in the rear seat floor. A biggie for me is it does not have a transmission temp gauge. This first year's version has some weird programming (Such as tow haul and tow + modes that turn off every time you shut down the engine) that surely will be fixed in shot order. (NOTE: Just as Ford has with not turning on the transmission temp feature and killing the Auto Stop. Both of which can be easily fixed with a good scanner). IMHO, I think Toyota has significantly closed the technology gap on the Ford F-150 platform. Will be interesting to see the TFL head to head comparisons between the big three sometime in January 2022. And then down the road how TFL rates the reliability of this new model. Personally, I would wait a year for the glitches to be identified and fixed. At that point I would have a hard time choosing between the top three half tons!
  16. Oliver could benefit from the aerodynamic improvements made on the model: Eliminating the vent and antenna from the frontal over the top primary flow zone, having the AC top slanted up a bit in the rear to reduce tongue weight at high speeds. And it brings to mind suggesting that the front center high roof section could be expanded in width to allow the solar panels to hide full width behind it to also improve the aerodynamic efficiency... and give us a bit more ceiling height in the bath and closet too! ..... me thinks at least one of us has too much time on our hands today! 🙂 Regardless... really cool modeling!
  17. Sweet! That just solved my puzzle! Thanks Scuba RX!
  18. I think Nobody, or Everybody should Always be cautious in using absolutes: Perfect, Always, & Never are my favorites.... just a few of them. However in my case, I never am always correct, never Totally Wrong or Totally Right..., and my words are always perfect. Except this time for sure. 🙂 GJ
  19. Just for grins, it would be fun to park your truck in the HOA with this set up. "But sir, I just opened up the cover. I promise to close it next month. Show me in the bylaws where I can't open my truck bed cover!"
  20. SeaDog: I can assure you that if you don't use your A/C much, you'll likely never suffer from mineralization of your evap coil regardless of your fan setting. In practice, for even part time A/C use, the fan setting would not cause mineralization for just about any location. The unit will generally die first of old age, electrical shorts or compressor failure....not mineralization. However, for those that rely on their A/C and use if consistently, especially down south where hot and humid humid conditions prevail, the problem of mineralization accumulation primarily caused by coil drying with each cycle (Due to the fan running continuously, climbs significantly. For that group, the removal of calcified deposits requires a strong acid, and THAT is something that most of us would not want to mess with. Sorry I was not more clear. GJ
  21. CNC you are spot on. One additional thought that compliments yours. By running the fan continuously, the dehumidification features is greatly reduced. WHY? Because when the compressor cycles off, it stops cooling the coil. With the fan still running, the gallon or more of water trapped in the coil evaporates off back into the trailer. Resulting in a much higher average humidity in the trailer. The above will likely result in the occupant setting the unit to a cooler temperature. Result: use of more energy and marginal comfort improvement. Bad. But MUCH worse is that by evaporating off all that water, the entrained minerals plate out on to your evap coil. This becomes a rock hard deposit that only strong acid will remove. Not something that 99.5% of us want to be doing. Best solution for humidity control for an oversized A/C is to run the fan on auto and low speed. This also keeps in "solution" the minerals and the majority of it runs out the evap drain tube to the ground. GJ
  22. NOTE: This thread is not about how loud your OEM A/C is. Please go to the "Got Ear Plugs" or other threads for those discussions. This thread does seek info from OE1 (ONE) owners who have used their trailers in hot conditions. INTRODUCTION: It would be beneficial to know what owners think about the cooling capacity of various A/C units running in very hot conditions. SURVEY QUESTIONS: What is your user name, OE1 (ONE) model year, and it's Hull Number? What A/C do you currently have and what is it's BTU rating? While using shore power, what was the max outside temperature you have stressed your current A/C? How well did it perform? Other comments you would like to add? +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ SAMPLE desired SURVEY RESPONSE FORMAT: (Happens to be my response for my unit) Invisible Owner, 1842, Hull -200 Domenica 13,500 BTU I have run my unit at 150 degrees conditions under direct sunlight. It cooled very well. Generally I think my unit is oversized. When I replace it, I will seek a smaller capacity model that uses less power; such as an inverter compressor with variable speed fans for evening use. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Again please don't respond with comments about how loud your unit is. We have beaten that horse enough. However how quiet yours runs is fair game for owners that have replaced their unit. Such experiences will help other owners in selecting a future replacement A/C 's so both size and quiet experiences are encouraged. I'm looking forward to reading your "Cool Experiences" . Thank you, GJ
  23. LOL. Yep, the survey was for the OEII owners. But we enjoyed your input regardless. In fact, I'll start another thread for the OE1's to respond to as it may be good info for OTT to have. GJ GJ EDIT: Second survey for OE1 (ONE) owners is posted. 🙂
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