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Film/Coatings to Front Oliver to Limit Dents


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We doing the same investigations as we spend 50% + time on gravel. We are using Rock Tampers and they help but don't get the job done for us. There is a lot posted about clear 3m film and the like but we would like more protection than film can provide and a permanent low to no-maintenance solution. Vortext and Line-x spay on pickup bed liner materails are high on our list as a possibility. The Vortex looks really nice but there are no suppliers within a reasonable distance of our home and the cost is $3k+.

 

We met with our local Line-x dealer last week that has done a great job on two of our pickups about spraying a "mask" on our Oliver. He has done several trailers (fiberglass and Alu) and said has had good bonding and overall durability with the Line-x process on fiberglass trailers. We were told "Line-x's boding to fiberglass is more than sufficient for the application/function of heavy duty rock protection. This said, it will not be as "bomb proof" as are applications on steel or aluminum pick-up beds. You can throw hammers onto Line-x in the bed of a pick-up with little if any damage. "

 

We were quoted $800 for a full front mask (tongue to lower front marker lights to the bottom of shell seam). We discussed black but Line-x offers color matching so will follow up to see if white is a line-x option. We have yet to pull the trigger and are interested in what everyone will have to say about vortex vs line-X vs other film/coating options per Bobfirst's post.

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Check in your area for company’s that do vehicle graphic wraps. They can wrap any area you like with a clear vinyl wrap that is used mostly for the front of vehicles. It will keep the areas you want protected. Then after time it can be easily removed and replaced. They use heat guns to conform to all curves. I had a Freind who did the clear wrap on the front of his trucks bumper hood and fenders its very hard to tell that it was even done. I think others have posted different ways to protect the front you should be able to search them

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Honestly I can’t answer that. I’ve never been to Alaska it’s my understanding that some of the roads are ruff I’m sure no matter what you put on if you travel miles on gravel roads there’s going to be some damage. I read some have used home made mats not pretty but worked. John Davies has a good mud rock guard design.  The graphic installer can answer your question. In My opinion it won’t  protect from a Alaska trip.  Under normal road conditions I would say yes.  Hope you find the right combination.

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The problem with any film that you put on the trailer is that it doesn’t stop rocks from bouncing back at your truck. You will find debris on top of your rear bumper, chips in the tailgate paint and license plate, pits in the glass and and possible a busted rear glass, if you are very unlucky. Taylor.coyote.... if you indeed are going to be spending half your towing miles on gravel (!) then you need to do what I did.

 

29D29CAE-B37A-48A2-AE7D-5922B1B962E6.thumb.jpeg.12b12349834ec37c964c550814d63ee7.jpeg

 

https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/how-to-stone-stomper-gravel-guard/

 

https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/how-to-subframe-gravel-guard/

 

https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/how-to-rear-mud-flaps-for-the-ollie/

 

The Stone Stomper works magnificently. The downsides are that it requires a lot of custom fabrication since you can’t just screw some brackets into the front of the hull. Hitching and unhitching is more complicated, but you get used to the extra steps. You cannot use it in sticky, gloppy mud, it will get overloaded and damaged. For soupy mud, no worries. The manufacturer says to remove it for “offroad”, meaning any situation where it will get dragged into obstacles.

 

The mesh sends all the chaos from the road - rocks, water, tar, dirt, fresh chip seal - underneath the frame. The area above the A frame stays very clean and dry, as does the back of the TV. But you need to catch all that stuff before it sand blasts your suspension, frame and under side of the hull, thus the need for rubber flaps. Which cause increased drag. At 60 mph in pouring rain, the rear glass and front of the trailer below the beltline remain almost dry. I seldom need to use the rear wiper until I slow down.

 

I have used the Stone Stomper and associated flaps for over 10,000 miles now and I would not travel without it. The front of “Mouse” looks like new, as does the frame. The mesh is holding up very well, the only problem I had was with the center support poles. I used thin Schedule 40 PVC conduit and they started to fail after a couple of thousand miles (snapped in two). I replaced them with heavy wall Schedule 80 pipe and have had no further problems. I do carry spares, just in case, but you can buy a ten foot piece at any hardware store and cut it to length in a half hour at the campsite.

 

Cost is reasonable and customer support has been stellar, the current exchange rate (1.00 AUD is less than 0.70 USD) makes it affordable. Shipping was very fast, but mine got held up at US Customs for a week. ;(

 

I have used Rock Tamers in the past, but even when they are rigged “Aussie style” at a 30 degree static angle (to deflect rocks downwards, not back at the truck) they are only vaguely effective.

 

Your choice of tires has an enormous effect on the quantity of rocks thrown up. A tight tread design like a typical All Terrain will constantly send up a barrage of the fine gravel typically found on graded roads. A mud tire with wide spacing (like my Nitto Ridge Grapplers) throws up maybe 10% as much. Plus it grips way better in turns, a big bonus when you are pulling three tons of trailer.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

 

 

 

 

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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I took The Wonder Egg to Alaska last year. It had everything in the front and below the belly band covered with multiple layers of Vortex and automotive paint to match my gelcoat. Overall, I was very satisfied. Nothing will ever chip my front lower section again, however, a few small bits of the automotive paint were chipped. These were easily covered over with touch-up paint from any auto store ... the key is to find the right brilliant white color match for your trailer.

 

John's Stone Stomper gravel guard would preclude those tiny hits in the lower front.

 

I spent 200+ miles on dirt roads in Alaska and felt very protected. BUT . . . The only bigs whacks my rig received weren't on dirt roads, instead, it was the numerous large construction trucks speeding in the opposite direction on narrow, paved two lane highways without adequate tarps on top, tossing off rocks and hurling stones from their wheels. I received a nice front windshield chip on the truck and one high placed chip on the front shoulder of The Wonder Egg.

 

When you see one of those construction trucks approaching, the best course of action is to move to the right as far as possible and slow down until they pass.

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Pete & "Bosker".    TV -  '18 F150 Super-cab Fx4; RV  - "The Wonder Egg";   '08 Elite, Hull Number 014.


Travel blog of 1st 10 years' wanderings - http://www.peteandthewonderegg.blogspot.com


ABBCMBNBNLNSONPEQCSKYTALAKAZARCACOCTFLGAHIIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMAMIMNMSMOMTNENVNHNJNMNYNCNDOHOKORPAPRSCSDTNTXUTVTVAWAWVWIWYsm.jpg

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Please tell us more about your Vortex coating process.

 

Do you perceive Vortext to be similar to to Line-X coating material?

 

why did you choose Vortext over other pick-up bed liner material?

 

Did you choose the skill/trailer/fiberglass experience of the installer as the primary reason to go with your coating process?

 

did you have a special application of more layers/thicker than the standard that is done to pick-up bed application?

 

the cost to line pick-up beds for Votext range from $500-$700 in California. the prices I have heard for Vortext trailer applications have ranged to $3k+. Do you know why trailer applications has such a large price difference from pick-up bed applications?

 

please tell us about the color matching process.

 

 

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Do you perceive Vortext to be similar to to Line-X coating material?

No. Vortex has a severe impact resistance. I saw a guy whang with a large hammer on some Vortex that had spilled onto the floor, and the Vortex just laughed at his pitiful attempts. Zero impact was seen.

 

Why did you choose Vortext over other pick-up bed liner material?

I believe it to be superior in psi impact needed for damage. Linex might do the job (who knows?), but I desired the best available.

 

Did you choose the skill/trailer/fiberglass experience of the installer as the primary reason to go with your coating process?

I went to these guys, they are pros with RV's, mainly dealing with high end Class A's. Plus, they were only 40 miles from my house. http://www.ironhorserv.com/rv-service/rv-paint-and-body/

 

Did you have a special application of more layers/thicker than the standard that is done to pick-up bed application?

They did their standard, multi-layered Vortex application.

 

The cost to line pick-up beds for Votext range from $500-$700 in California. the prices I have heard for Vortext trailer applications have ranged to $3k+. Do you know why trailer applications has such a large price difference from pick-up bed applications?

No I don't. Could it be that they deal with foo-foo Class A motorhomes and my itty bitty Oliver Elite and figure we'd pay? Or are the bed liners put on with fewer coatings? I dunno.

 

Please tell us about the color matching process.

They put a gizmo up against the gelcoat and it spit out numbers, from which they mixed the high end automotive paint.

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Pete & "Bosker".    TV -  '18 F150 Super-cab Fx4; RV  - "The Wonder Egg";   '08 Elite, Hull Number 014.


Travel blog of 1st 10 years' wanderings - http://www.peteandthewonderegg.blogspot.com


ABBCMBNBNLNSONPEQCSKYTALAKAZARCACOCTFLGAHIIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMAMIMNMSMOMTNENVNHNJNMNYNCNDOHOKORPAPRSCSDTNTXUTVTVAWAWVWIWYsm.jpg

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