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Tick mitigation/ avoidance


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3 hours ago, John E Davies said:

Whenever I see horses and also know that there are bear, moose, deer and free range cattle around, I think TICKS. Is that a problem this time of year?

I know you know mitigation measures, John, but I'll put it out here for new campers in our group,  who may be more accustomed to urban environments.

Decades ago, ticks were pretty much just an annoyance. Now, with  diseases carried, we're all more careful. 

What I do:

Long pants. Tucked into hiking socks. Spray clothing (not my skin) with deet, if it's season.

Long sleeves. Tuck in your shirt. Stay out of long grass, and shrub when possible. 

Light colored clothing makes it easier to see the critters. A forester years ago told me khaki color is best.

Shower daily. Ticks usually wander awhile before they find a sweet spot. A scrubbing shower will usually dislodge unattached wanderers. 

Check dogs frequently.  Comb them. Medicate ahead if time. They're susceptible to Lyme disease, too. Though not likely, ticks can wander from them, to you.

If you do find a tick, remove it carefully, properly,  and promptly.  You can keep it in a jar or zip lock for analysis later.

In my years if camping and hiking, I've had some ticks attach, even being careful.  Three on my dogs. Even if you're careful,  it can happen. Not to panic. Not every tick is a disease carrier. But, it's best to limit exposure. 

I probably missed some ideas. Add away.

Sherry

 

 

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Sherry, good post. All I can add is that you can buy “tick repelling” clothing, it has permethrin built in. It will eventually wash out so you should not wash it too often.

https://www.rei.com/s/permethrin-insect-repellent-and-clothing

I try really hard to avoid brushing against bushes and low tree branches when hiking. Sometimes I use my cane to wack a shrub before I go past. I have NO IDEA if that helps knock ticks to the ground, but it sure makes me feel better to think so! I really hate ticks.

John Davies

Spokane WA

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Thanks, John.  I don't think many of us are fond of insects, as necessary as they are to our environment. 

All the measures I mentioned,  except deet, which I apply only when necessary, are great for mosquitoes,  chiggers, and sunburn, etc.,  as well.

Today's technical clothing makes it much easier to protect and cover up, without keeling over from heat exhaustion . 

I know my photo wouldn't win any fashion awards, but that's the least of my concerns in the woods. 🙂

 

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Permethrin spray used according to the label has been effective for me for the last 30 years. I’m in the field every week of the year 1 to 4 days.  This means spraying your clothing and boots before you put them on and letting them dry. I’m diligent in the spring (starting Feb 1st) and summer and I think there is enough residual to carry it to the fall.  
For skin application, I’ve had good results from picaridin sprays.  I doubt it’s any better for you than deet, just less researched!

As Sherry mentioned, a single bite does not mean you have one of the many diseases they carry, but ALWAYS look EVERYWHERE after being in their environment.  I believe most of the diseases have much higher transmission rates after 24 hours.

 

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David and Vicky
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Being a turkey hunter i deal with ticks each year, spring and fall. Spraying down your clothes with permethrin is the most effective way to dealing  with them. I also use light Camo coveralls uninsulated and insure that pants are tucked into boots. Also don’t forget about ginger’s“ a mite size bug that burrows under your skin. You can’t kill them by washing your clothes . They say the dryer will. And also if you do find a tick on you remove it right away and watch for signs of a bullseye rash that may appear around The site. Also see your doctor if you start feeling poorly Aches fever, etc. 

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There's a good discussion here of using DIY permethrin spray treatment on clothing (useful for ticks but  also mozzies and biting  flies!  it's a game changer IMO versus DEET on the  skin). It includes discussion of buying 10% dilution agricultural permethrin and further  diluting it to the appropriate strength for spraying your clothing and daypacks and other gear on which the damn ticks might hitchhike. 

Daily tick checks are important when in tick country and season. We now keep some of those spoon-shaped tick removers handy just in case as they are just right for removing ticks w/o spurting more of their potential bacterial load into your bloodstream. 

link: http://www.nwhikers.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=8017183&highlight=permethrin

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Jim and  Yanna, Woodinville WA

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