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My trailers just started in production.  Suppose to get it near the end of November. Just the small Elite because I'm not much for camp grounds. Like boon docking anywhere I like.  Anyway, it amazes me the Oliver for it's high price tag doesn't offer any special options.  I live here in the Northwest and we have to contend with a lot of mountain passes and hills. I wanted to have disc brakes instead of drums and no way.  Have to do the mod's my self.  Disc brakes with CarbonCeramic pad would be the ultimate brakes for any travel trailer. Never have to worry about brake fade and life expectancy is awesome.  More people should ask for it and maybe Oliver with switch over to disc.  Just my two cents worth.

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Welcome to the forum!

Some of us have been complaining for seven years 😬. Your trailer will be an easy plug and play mod, a set of stainless Kodiak 12” rotors and calipers would be perfect. The LE2 is not P&P because it has an oddball hub bolt pattern with its 3500 pound axles and 6 on 5.5 wheels….. you have to install bigger axles 😤 The service department will do the mod to your trailer after delivery. It will be expensive.

Where do you live? What route home do you plan to take? Please add your tow vehicle and trailer model to your signature.

John Davies

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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On my previous fifth wheel, we went in Indiana at MoRyde to get and independant suspension and disk break installed on the rig. Honestly, disk brake didn’t make a great difference because it is powerred electrictly and the reaction is always to much brake or not enough brake. Its hard to get the right ajustements. And the hydraulic pump and reservoir take a bit of space in compartment. In cold weather, sub zero, braking is harder because  of the oil viscosity type. For a small rig like Oliver, i won’t get it for the price and the small difference on braking for a light weigh rig…….

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Elite2 2022, #1120. RAM 3500 Laramie 2022 diesel SRW

Quebec, Canada

previous rig:  35 foot fifth wheel with Ford f350 2018 diesel DRW 

 

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Hi John,  I'll post a pic of my tow vehicle and trailer when I receive it.  It's a 22 year old vehicle and has over 240k miles on it but, she my baby and never left me stranded on the road. I've had numerous parts replaced on the vehicle to make sure I don't have any breakdown.  Yep!  It's a first generation Toyota Tundra Limited TRD. with mods. 

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On 10/13/2022 at 6:53 PM, Roger P said:

On my previous fifth wheel, we went in Indiana at MoRyde to get and independant suspension and disk break installed on the rig. Honestly, disk brake didn’t make a great difference because it is powerred electrictly and the reaction is always to much brake or not enough brake. Its hard to get the right ajustements. And the hydraulic pump and reservoir take a bit of space in compartment. In cold weather, sub zero, braking is harder because  of the oil viscosity type. For a small rig like Oliver, i won’t get it for the price and the small difference on braking for a light weigh rig…….

Too much or little application is usually a controller or actuator design causation. I use both a Redarc Elite and Prodigy P3 controllers when towing HydraStar EOH braked trailers, including  my LEII with 12" discs. The P3 modulation is noticeably smoother during light applications as in stop and go traffic but the Redarc is much easier to "tune"  on the fly for specific conditions. Point is, one controllers may perform "better" than another and some EOH actuators perform differently than others.

 As far as cold weather operation, there are two things that should be validated with any EOH installation subject to extreme cold temperature operation. Given your location, I would have expected MoRyde's top notch operation to be mindful of at least the first and suggest it be part of the installation. Hopefully they did.

First concern is the current rating of the 7-way aux circuit. EOH actuators typically need a 40 amp minimum for extreme cold operation but there is no consensus between vehicle manufactures and 20 or 30 amp circuits are the most typical. The Ram 3500 is 30 amps. I have had to upgrade every tow vehicle for EOH compatibility except my Toyota Land Cruiser, which came with 40.

Second is brake fluid. DOT 3 or 4 is generally the norm for manufacturer recommendations but DOT 4+ or 5.1 (not DOT 5) have a significantly lower viscosity at the low temperature end and will improve EOH performance below zero degrees. If the installer filled your system with DOT 4, this is the highest viscosity of all and not the ideal choice for extreme cold operation. I currently use a Bosch branded fluid that is an approved substitute for all of the above but there are a number of single spec, Low Viscosity, fluids available.

My experience with EOH disc brakes has been quite the opposite. Using either controller, the discs are more confidence inspiring in downhill or emergency applications, and don't feel the additional cost over electric drums is even a consideration. While the LEII is only about 6300# ready to go, behind my  7300# Land Cruiser, it hardly feels like a light-weight rig. Maybe I need a bigger truck.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello John,  I'm starting in Washington state, going thru Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri and into Tennessee.  Around 5,000miles to get there.  Coming back thru Arkansas, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Oregon and back home to Redmond, Washington.  It's a long haul in the winter time.

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4 hours ago, Buddhabelly said:

Hello John,  I'm starting in Washington state, going thru Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri and into Tennessee.  Around 5,000miles to get there.  Coming back thru Arkansas, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Oregon and back home to Redmond, Washington.  It's a long haul in the winter time.

What route gives you 5000 miles to Hohenwald? It should be around 2500. Been there, done that, in spring time.

My son lives in Redmond, we visit him often. 

John Davies

Spokane WA

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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