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BorninPalatka

Tire Pressure

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I think 80 is the max if I remember right. The best way to set your pressures is to weigh the trailer and then go to the manufacturers website - they usually have a chart for each tire that lists what they recommend for different weight ranges. I think mine are around 50 but I’m not able to check right now.

 

I had a long discussion with another owner I met at Oliver about whether Oliver puts way too much pressure in the tires from the factory. They thought that was part of the reason that people are seeing damage, doors popping open, etc.

 

I’m interested to hear what others think about that and what pressures they’re running.

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Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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That's the max pressure.  ST (standard trailer) tires should be inflated to the max pressure listed on the sidewall, (usually 50 psi) but LT tires don't need to be run at their max. Doing so will result in uneven tread wear and a rougher ride for the trailer.

 

 

 

I don't have an Oliver so I can't give you first-hand experience with how different tire pressures will handle long-term.  I expect that you will get a lot of opinions on this topic.  But according to the Michelin load tables (http://www.michelintruck.com/reference-materials/manuals-bulletins-and-warranties/load-and-inflation-tables/#/) 55 PSI should be fine as that will give you 2060 lbs of load capacity per tire, for a total of 8240 lbs trailer weight capacity.  You could go up or down 5 lbs and still be fine.

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2018 OLEII #344   |   2018 Ford Expedition


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I run mine at 60 psi and have noted no issues. I may try 55 next season. I dropped the pressure the morning after we picked up the trailer....

 

I have TPMS sensors that also show temperature. The tires heat up during normal use by about 4 to 6 psi, which is what they are supposed to do.

 

If the pressure is a lot lower than ideal, they will heat up more and have a bigger temp rise, which is their way of telling you that they may not be happy. Low pressure means more heat, increased rolling resistance, less mpgs, possible tread wear issues (edge wear) and increased likelihood of failure.

 

High pressure means less heat, possible tread wear issues (center wear), higher chance of puncture, rougher ride, and higher mpgs.

 

Just right pressure balances all these factors to give you the best ride and performance.

 

If you have to, err on the side of too much air since the natural tendency is to lose pressure over time. Starting out a little low just gets them that much closer to the trouble zone.

 

If you don’t use a TPMS system that shows temp, then you need to make a habit of manually checking your tires and hubs to see if one is too warm compared to the others. Your finger will work, but a temp gun is way better.

 

Don’t run 80 psi, that is just way too high for the load they carry..... FYI, running excessive pressure on a tandem trailer will wear out the center of the tread on all tires more quickly due to scrubbing (dragging sideways) when backing hard on pavement. Plus it reduces braking because the tires can skid more easily.

 

Here is a tire load chart specifically for the LTX tires .... it would be good to print the table and keep it where you can refer to it. Weight given is “per axle”.

 

Keep in mind that around 10% of the total weight is not carried by the trailer tires, but by the hitch.

 

http://read.dmtmag.com/i/41477-digital-toolbox/41?

 

In theory you could run 35 psi, but that gives you zero “reserve air” if one gets a leak and the pressure starts to drop.... I would be very reluctant to go under 50.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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Here is a new thread with a Tire Pressure Placard I made. You can print it out and/ or laminate it. The data came from the link above, which has way more info than we need, and it is a little flaky on some computers.

 

http://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/how-to-tire-pressure-placard/

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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Hi Lou Anne & Bobby

 

Our tires are the Michelins that were put on at the factory and I've always set them at 75 psi summer and winter and never had a problem. I would also recommend the TPMS sensors.  I haven't had any problems with drawers opening or seeing doors popping open or any other damage etc. Also, our tires don't seem to be showing any wear. I believe that I'll have to replace them due to age not wear.

 

Hap

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Did my pre delivery check out on Ollie 431 on 3/21/19. and asked why the 80 psi inflation. I was told that was how the wheels and tires came in from the supplier. Guess they (the supplier) anticipated maximum weight on the trailer.Told them (OTT) to drop it to 60 psi. Did not want my trailer bouncing along the interstate as it was 1200lbs shy of GVW!


2019 Legacy Elite #431;  2019. TV 2019 GMC Canyon Denali, crew cab, 4X4, Long bed, Duramax Diesel.

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I run mine at 60 PSI and the tires stay cool while not being rock hard.  I would never run them at 80.

 

My Ollie weighed 5,700 lbs on the last trip and had a tongue weight of about 560.  So, roughly 5,100 lbs divided by four tires, or 1,275 lbs on each tire.   If you look at the tire charts, be sure you are not looking at the "minimum" allowable pressure and interpreting as the "recommended" pressure.

 

On the last trip I varied the pressure from 45 - 50 and found everything was fine, but the tires ran warmer.  Not hot, but definitely warmer.

 

Off road, they can be let down to about 30 to smooth out the ride a bit.  At slow speeds, they will not heat up.


John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

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They don't give minimum pressures, but maximum loads for each pressure - which I guess is the same thing in the end.  Regardless, I guess the minimum per Michelin's chart for 5,100 lbs would be 35 psi, which gives a max load of 6,000 lbs.  I'd be interested/surprised if anyone runs theirs that low.  IMO, 45 psi is pretty safe, since that pressure gives a max load well over the max wt. of the trailer, allowing you to lose 5 or even 10 psi from a tire before potentially damaging it.  And that's soft enough that nothing seems to get jostled around too much inside.  I haven't noticed them being anything other than slightly warm to the touch, regardless of pressure.   According to my tire monitors, whichever side the sun is on has more influence on temperature than pressure, at least within the range I've tried.

 

I wouldn't bat an eye if someone told me they ran theirs at 40 psi.  At 35, I'd say that's on the edge.

 

 


Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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My "lower limit" is 45 and I usually only do that to get from a dirt road in the desert to the nearest gas station with a compressor. I ran that pressure on the last leg of one trip on the highway just to check it out, and they definitely ran warmer than at 50 and again at 60 psi.  Warmer means more stress on the tire and more rolling resistance.

 

So, I'd say 45 is the lower limit for me and not a good choice.  Plus it leaves no headroom if I pick up a nail and don't notice it until the next fuel stop.  Also, the difference in ride smoothness between 45 and 60 may not make a real difference.  A couple of my upper cabinets still open sometimes and my cushions will not stay in place unless jammed in sideways.  On washboard roads, all bets are off and there is no tire pressure that will stop the chaos.  Window coverings come off and my microwave refused to stay in place before I remodeled that cabinet.  This while looking for the smoothest speed of about 10 mph and 30-35 PSI in the tires.  My feeble compressor was used to raise them from 30-35 PSI up to 45 for some highway and a better place to top them off.  Now, I have a new compressor and will be able to set them wherever I want.

 

I also carry a tire plug kit and have used it.  These can be had for cheap and they are a very good tool to have along.  It's  easier to plug and refill a leaking tire than to change it and it keeps your spare available in case you really need it.  I got a 3/8" bolt through my truck tire in the middle of nowhere, while towing Ollie and we were out of there in 20 minutes with no further problems.  I've also used it to fix other people's tires in Death Valley.

 

 

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John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

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I am now running 45 psi instead of 60. I am sure it rides less roughly, which is more important to me than cooler temps or less rolling resistance. I did blow out two shocks a year after delivery. I don’t know if my higher running pressure then had anything to do with that. But it could have contibuted. Less sidewall movement increases the load on shocks and springs.

 

I won’t hesitate to drop the trailer tires to 30 if I have to tow a long way on potholes or washboard. I sometimes air down my Land Cruiser to 25 psi cold, which is about 30 warm. The extra flex really softens the ride for the occupants. But speeds must be kept low or the tires will quickly overheat. You can’t just hop on the highway and drive half an hour to an air pump, it won’t be safe.

 

BTW my avitar picture is of me squatting down beside my old Series 80 lowering air pressure by installing Staun tire deflators-a very cool tool, worthwhile if you want to do this routinely with minimal time and fuss.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Staun-Automatic-Tire-Deflators-Standard/dp/B00QBPBLWY

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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I also carry a tire plug kit and have used it.  These can be had for cheap and they are a very good tool to have along.

I had never heard of a tire plug kit. I quick search, and I saw a short how-to video. I am getting one of these!

 

Thanks for posting this. I learn so much on this forum!


David Stillman, Salt Lake City, Utah

2016 Oliver Elite II  Hull 164    |    2017 Audi Q7 tow vehicle. 

Travel and Photography Blog: http://davidstravels.net

 

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There are a number of different types of tire plugging systems on the market.  Most are the "string" type - these use what looks like a string of black material that is inserted into the hole in the tire.  However, there are also some that are a bit more substantial and resemble the "mushroom" plugs that many tire repair shops use.  Which ever type you wind up with I'd suggest that you find an old tire and practice with it a couple of times prior to actually needing to perform a real plugging on the side of a dark wet road in the middle of nowhere.  Also, after plugging a tire make sure that you check the air pressure in that tire often for the first couple of days just to make sure that the plug has done its job.

 

Bill

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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DavidS, this is a very good one, it is more expensive than the Walmart Slime kind but has all the tools plus a TactiCool zip case. ... https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00EQ1IOS4/?coliid=IU1AGCDTAQVZJ&colid=26R5Z0L5VZEWU&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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I recommend getting a kit with high quality tools.  Sometimes you really have to push on them and sometimes the rasp has to go into a ragged hole and clean it up.

 

If you buy an expensive kit in a nice box, you can add to it by buying some extra yarns, or whatever they are called, and an extra tube of rubber contact cement.  The kits now mostly come with a grease type sealant and I don't think it is as good.  The rubber cement can be squeezed into the hole and flooded all over the yarns before they are pushed in.  It makes a good lubricant and then sets up to seal.  Tubes of it are very cheap and sold next to the repair kits at auto parts stores.

 

Also, add a few round inner tube patches to the kit so you can fix your bicycle tube while on a trip.  This is done with the contact cement and the tube patches.

 

The strings, or yarns can work better than the rubber plugs because often the hole is not round and can be larger than the rubber plugs might work in.  Not all repairs are perfect, but most will get you home or to a tire shop.  As mentioned, I recently fixed a hole in my tire that was from a 3/8" bolt.  I drove it 150 miles to the Las Vegas to get a new tire and had no leak.  If you are just fixing a hole from a nail in the tread, this fix can be considered permanent and road worthy.

 

So, pick a high quality tool set that comes in a plastic closeable box. Add some extra yarns, some contact cement and some bike tire patches.  You can also add a schrader valve tool,  a couple of new schrader valves and a couple of air caps.  You can even add a couple of tubeless tire valve stems and a tool to install them, but that be a bit much.

 

I always have a bottle of windex handy in my truck for washing hands and cleaning stuff.  This will work for checking for leaks.

 

I also always have a 12 volt compressor, or an inverter and a 120 volt compressor, with me. These not only allow me to fix a tire, but allow me to air back up after a desert trip where I aired down.

 

Here's the kit I put together that rides in my truck:  It started out as a Black Jack tire repair kit and I added the rest.

0-3.thumb.jpeg.cfe2da7c71102efbb3e5e27120c30b9a.jpeg

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John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

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I also carry a tire plug kit and have used it. These can be had for cheap and they are a very good tool to have along.

I had never heard of a tire plug kit. I quick search, and I saw a short how-to video. I am getting one of these!

 

Thanks for posting this. I learn so much on this forum!

 

Just make sure you understand, you can only plug the tread area of a tire.  You cannot plug a sidewall puncture.  If your damage is in the sidewall,  it's spare tire  time.  This is a great thread.  I always have tire plug kits on my ATVs too.


2018 Elite II, Hull #414 (the very last 2018 produced).  Trailer name "2 HOBOS" .   2006 Dodge 3500 Megacab, 4x4 with 5.9L Cummins diesel.

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Just make sure you understand, you can only plug the tread area of a tire. You cannot plug a sidewall puncture. If your damage is in the sidewall, it’s spare tire time. This is a great thread. I always have tire plug kits on my ATVs too.

Very true, and a great reason to switch to a tougher LT tire style if you venture even a few times onto forest roads. A true offroad tread is way heavier, stiffer and has more material in the sidewalls to resist cuts. The big downsides are more expense and rolling resistance and worse mileage, and a rougher ride. I really like the Nitto Ridge Grapplers. The upside besides flat resistance is your truck will be the tough looking one in the grocery store parking lot. LOL.

 

If you have light weight comfy squooshy P-rated passenger car tires at least carry a full sized spare since a sidewall cut is a high possibility. Montana especially seems to like to put sharp 3 inch ballast rock on its forest roads. Once you slash a tire and have to drive two hours to the nearest tire store on a space saver donut tire, you will understand, it is seared deep in your soul, pisses off your navigator and ruins your vacation.

 

If you are venturing into red rock country like southern UT this is not a big problem since the rocks are rounded and there is usually lots of sand.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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Just make sure you understand, you can only plug the tread area of a tire. You cannot plug a sidewall puncture. If your damage is in the sidewall, it’s spare tire time. This is a great thread. I always have tire plug kits on my ATVs too.

 

 

That "rule",  is of course true for the most part.    But when out in the desert with a flat spare, it absolutely means nothing.  If choosing between walking for miles in the hot sun, or plugging a sidewall, the sidewall plug wins every time.  Sometimes blanket rules are invalid, or even downright dangerous, if strictly adhered too.   It's better to  remind someone that sidewall fixes are emergency repairs, and only good enough to get you to the tire shop at low speeds, while tread repairs can be permanent and safe.  Any roadside repair, on a back road in the desert, is an emergency repair in my book.  And different standards apply when it comes to getting stranded, vs simply getting local help with a quick phone call.   A sidewall cut in a Walmart parking lot, for instance, would just mean a minor inconvenience while you get a new tire.  In the desert, I intend to keep going, with what I have with me, if possible.

 

 

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John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

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