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Yukon

Winter Operations''

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Ok i have reviewed and executed the Pink Winterization procedures from the Oliver Video. I have a questions for people operating in below freezing conditions. I have elected to keep heat on in the oliver over the winter and will try to maintain above 32 degrees . I also allowed heated air to enter the compartments under the bunks via removal of the access ports under the beds and elevating the Mattresses .  Question 1  For guys hunting or boon docking in remote areas off the grid what procedures do you use to keep the Oliver from freezing Up.?  I am assuming the Heating via Propane Tanks are always on and city water connection are discontinued and water is drawn via the Fresh Water holding tank and pump. ''' What other operations am i forgetting ?..that are required to not allow freeze Up''......thanks Yukon.

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Yukon -

 

yes on the heat being on via the propane furnace and city water disconnected.  However,  depending on just how cold you are talking about, drawing water from the fresh water tank could be a problem for you.  Whenever I camp in sustained cold temps I simply keep my water in portable containers (gallon milk jugs for the toilet and other water needs if I'm not out too long and larger 8 gallon containers if I plan on being out awhile).  This way, there is no water in the water lines of the Oliver at all.

 

Bill


2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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Just make sure you have plenty of propane, your oliver is a true 4 season camper, but it's not as efficient as your "stix and bricks". I'm not afraid to use the onboard water, and we have camped in weather down into single digits, but the area you need to be concerned with is the street side water fills and the outside shower. They have check valves on the inside, but no direct source of heat, if i camped in extreme cold more frequently I would cut in an access port under the street side bed that I could open when it got really cold.

 

Steve


STEVEnBETTY

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I am not a cold weather camper, but I want to throw in a caution about RV appliances in general. They are nowhere as reliable (or efficient) as home units - always have some sort of backup heat available in case the furnace quits or you run out of gas. The latter does happen even to an experienced RVer. A nearly empty bottle may not have enough gas pressure to work well in arctic temps, keep them topped up. I would feel safe with a generator and a small 1500 w electric box (forced air) heater, which stores away nicely in a cabinet or on a closet shelf. The generator is something you should definitely have anyway, for charging on a dim overcast winter day or when your panels are blocked by shade or snow.....

 

I am not averse to winter camping, I just don’t want to cosmetically wreck my Ollie from caustic road deicers ... if I lived in a southern state I would be out there now.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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Ok'' Thanks much'' all appreciated. Generator for sure a good idea. portable water , cube heater and the best idea i see is to operate with winterization in effect. Having  once hunted in cold temps out of a converted school bus we dug a latrine, carried portable water in jugs for cooking and cleaning. I am a little surprised that a small heater is not supplied in the area of the water pump and water supply lines. Once temps moderate i can dump the anti freeze if i have a city supply of fresh water to flush. Then if temps crash i would have to winterize all over again.  I placed a thermometer in the street side hatch under the bunk compartment this AM and closed up all hatch to get a feel for the temp down there with a space heater operating via the cabin, the temp here outside is 25 degrees and i will see if any residual heat from the cabin will make its under the mattresses and closed compartments.  Thanks Guys''..............Yukon

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The furnace and ducts are uninsulated, so it will keep the pump and water lines in that area pretty toasty.  It’s the lines in the rear street side that are the ones to worry about.   If you think you’ll need to winterize often, then I’d invest in a small compressor or air tank to blow the lines out after you refill the tank.  It’s an easier way to winterize anyway.


Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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I had two 110v outlets added between the shells and installed two small 300w bilge heaters by XTREME.  One is near the water pump and the other is over near the external shower connections.  If the air between the shells dip below 40 degrees, they come on and heat the air around them to 50 degrees before turning off.  The fans are very quiet and cannot be heard inside the trailer.

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Pete & "Bosker".    TV -  '18 F150 Super-cab Fx4; RV  - "The Wonder Egg";   '08 Elite, Hull Number 014.


Travel blog of 1st 10 years' wanderings - http://www.peteandthewonderegg.blogspot.com


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Interesting.  I had them put an outlet in the basement for the same reason and have that xtreme heater on my amazon list but haven’t bought it yet.  I started debating just adding a vent and small fan between the basement and main cabin.  Still haven’t decided which way to go.


Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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Thanks Overland, Jason sent out a winterization Blog and he did not recommend we blowout the waterlines, if i remember correctly it was due to not completely removing all water using that method. I also would be a little concerned on how much PSI of air to use. Remember Oliver gives us a water pressure reducer for good reason......Yukon

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So long as you have a pressure regulator on your air tank/compressor, it should be fine.  Just set it to 60psi.  There’s a tremendous fudge factor there even if you went a bit higher since air is compressible, and wont hammer the lines like water.  Plus you’ll have a faucet open when you blow the line so not much pressure will build anyway.

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Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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Overland, got it '' I am starting to become interested in the Extreme heater option mentioned '' i need to look into it more'' that maybe a good option   thanks  Yukon

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