Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
rideadeuce

Additional 100w suitcase

Recommended Posts

Very well built 100 w panel by Renogy with built in weather resistant 2o amp controller. Just had to buy some solar wire and a SAE reverse polarity connector due to Zamp having to be different and have their positive reversed.

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00AHCWGOO/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_5KriDbREVM10F

 

or this has the MC4 to SAE pigtail connector and the reverse polarity connector

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07MW1M1VB/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_USriDb8YFZ5M3

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B079JVBVL3/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_hWriDb67S7GYB

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JH1QD54/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_xXriDbNEJHBD9

 

 

IMG_3272.thumb.jpeg.ff7f0ace1a7333970753b433fb427e53.jpeg

IMG_3271.thumb.jpeg.03c0438712d7b4955b3d69c9cf619f6f.jpeg

  • Thanks 1

- Mike


Nashville, TN


2018 Elite II - Spirit of Adventure Hull #308  - Toyota Tundra 


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool. I am jealous, this has been on my wish list for several years. There is a newer Eclipse version for about $75 more, do you know anything about that one, and what is different about it?

 

https://smile.amazon.com/Renogy-100-Watt-Monocrystalline-100W-Waterproof/dp/B01NADR1CI/ref=dp_ob_title_garden

 

Thanks,

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like the eclipse is a lighter weight version without the kickstand. So you would have to lay it or hang it somewhere. At first, I thought that is what I had because the voyager controller was a weatherproof upgrade at the time or purchase last year.

 

 

 

 

  • Thanks 1

- Mike


Nashville, TN


2018 Elite II - Spirit of Adventure Hull #308  - Toyota Tundra 


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, so I have found another iteration with the solar controller and kickstand... but the only difference is weight again. Under 20 lbs. Sorry, hope that helps.


- Mike


Nashville, TN


2018 Elite II - Spirit of Adventure Hull #308  - Toyota Tundra 


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Renogy 100 watt suitcase and it is very nice.   Nice durable canvas cover, mechanical latch and strong carrying handle.  It stands in the closet and takes up almost no room.  The controller and chord store between the collectors when folded.   And it really does put out some useable power.

 

Mine is going with my Oliver when it sells, so I already ordered another one to replace it.

 

From actual testing results, comparing a tracking system with a flat roof system, the tracking system puts out about 250 % of what the same size flat system will do.  So, a suitcase system that can be adjusted during the day, gives a lot of bang for the buck.  Plus, you can park in the shade and you don't have to climb up to the roof to clean the panels.

 

The 20 amp controller is big enough to handle two more panels too.

  • Thanks 3

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike,

 

Is your solar receptacle the TOEDUK SAE socket on your Ollie?

 

Been thinking about installing a Furrion receptacle I've seen on other Ollies until seeing your setup, nice job!  Just installed the waterproof Renogy  controller on our Renogy 100W suitcase and it's working great!

 

https://www.amazon.com/Toeduk-Weatherproof-sidewall-Waterproof-Connect/dp/B07FVQ39HW/ref=sr_1_14?keywords=rv+solar+plug&qid=1562501283&s=gateway&sr=8-14

 

Thanks,

 

Bill

 

 

IMG_3380.thumb.jpg.f1338e7f4a19aa2db08449dd5de9043d.jpg

  • Thanks 1

Bill

LE2 Tundra

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[postquote quote=180177][/postquote]

That receptacle would be OK inside the battery compartment, but the rubber cover looks very dorky IMHO and according to reviewers it doesn’t stay on. The max amp rating is low, 10 amps, like the Furion. If I were using that sort of connection I would pick a high quality 30 amp Anderson Power Pole set (crimp pins and self cleaning) and use a surface or chassis mount inside the compartment. If I ever decide to replace my Furion, I would use this in the same outside location.

 

7786CAB2-80B2-48C9-B938-AB3737989C20.jpeg.8906c5c522250a66537dc0497ec764e5.jpeg

 

https://powerwerx.com/panelpole-panel-mount-powerpole-housing

 

I would gut the Furion, cut a 1 1/8” hole and mount the PP socket inside the Furion door..... with the biggest PP pins and fat cables going to the battery it would handle up to 90 amps ?... The Furion door and weather seal seems to work well.

 

FD1BD4A5-C088-4D66-909C-20AE6BD79677.jpeg.c269cf15ee93befacd100731b5f11d2f.jpeg

 

BTW soldered connections are bad for an RV or car, they can fracture from vibration. Properly crimped ones are ideal.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

  • Thanks 2

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have have a Zamp 3-port SAE (one port open from factory, so it is easy to add panels) combiner box up top and the Zamp SAE outside connected directly to the battery. The only thing that you have to do is get an SAE reverses polarity connector for the outside, if using non-Zamp solar panel.

  • Thanks 1

- Mike


Nashville, TN


2018 Elite II - Spirit of Adventure Hull #308  - Toyota Tundra 


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike and John,

 

Been reading post here about connecting the 100W panel with an exterior receptacle to Ollie.

 

Thanks for the ideas, will post results!

 

Bill

  • Thanks 1

Bill

LE2 Tundra

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Thanks 1

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my 20 amp solar plug.  It could not be simpler and requires only a small hole.   The cap is absolutely weather tight and the plug "twist locks" on, so it cannot fall off.

 

An easy way to make a very good cord is to take a #12 outside extension cord and cut it to length.  These have heavy stranded wire in a durable and very flexible PVC jacket.  The length just has to be enough to allow you to set the panels anywhere necessary to get unobstructed sun.   I cut mine at 20', but it is probably longer than needed.  When done, just roll it up and put it between the panels in their carrying case.

 

Another way to go is to install an Anderson plug near the front of the trailer, on a larger cable that runs back to the batteries.  The collectors can plug into that and it can also be used to charge the batteries from the tow vehicle.

0-3-1_04.18-PM.thumb.jpeg.7b7e792a73cf5b051dbd1618bb779cfd.jpeg

  • Thanks 2

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John (Raspy),

 

Been looking at installation on the front of the LP gas bottle enclosure. There's enough room for two additional wires where Oliver ran the multi wire bundle  in a loom through the front of the hull under the LP gas enclosure. Would need to fish the wires out under the black water tank running to batteries.

 

Currently connecting the 100W panel to the trailer 7 pin connector until installing something better.

 

Anderson connectors look rugged.

 

Bill

 

 

Solar-7-pin-connection.jpg.a21525b44ff38c41125e6668a6aa03bc.jpg


Bill

LE2 Tundra

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A question about these remote panels.

 

If you have the factory installed solar power setup, wouldn't it be more efficient to order your remote solar panels without a charge controller and just wire them in to the onboard controller? If your remote panels do have a built in charge controller, then I assume you are wiring them straight to your batteries? With the controller on the remote panels, I would think there would be substantial voltage drop between the controller and battery, seeing as most wire used for remote panels are 10 gauge. Just trying to sort this out. Thanks

 

 

 

Dave


2015 Oliver Elite, Hull 107


1998 Ford E-250, 5.4 liter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill,

 

 

 

Connecting to the seven pin seems like a simple solution.

 

While Reed and I were tracing down his grounding problem, we discovered his pigtail went in below the bottles and disappeared into where we could not trace it out very well.  Mine had the problem too, but was wired much differently than his.  Hull 92 vs. Hull 200.

 

I ended up putting the solar plug where shown, and then connecting more of the #12 cable directly to the batteries.  The wire doesn't seem like it will get into trouble and the battery tray can still roll out as needed.

 

I noticed at the rally, on the night of the drawings and prizes, that the suitcase system they gave away was a 140 watt system with slightly larger panels.  I looked on-line when ordering my new set, but did not see that model.  I would only have bought it if it would stand up on the left side of the closet, as the 100 does.

 

At Yellowstone, I needed to charge, but we were in the trees and mostly shaded.  I didn't bring the generator, and the charging police came by to tell me not to charge from the truck!

 

My profligate energy use came to a screeching halt.  I needed one of those little chipmonk exercise wheels hooked to a generator.

  • Thanks 1

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave,

 

 

 

It does seem tempting to connect the ground collectors to the roof controller, but I don't know if it's a good idea or not.  If the roof panels are shaded and they shut off, will some power be lost from the ground system?  I haven't done any testing, but an 8 amp max charging current run through #12 stranded wire doesn't seem like a problem.  The wire is rated for 20 amp continuous.  More of a problem might be routing the suitcase system wires in a convoluted way with lots of connections, in order to get to the batteries, instead of just hooking directly to the batteries.  It does seem that a 20' lead is rather long, but I haven't tested for voltage drop to prove it.

 

Somehow, it seems kind of silly to split hairs on the wires, when the real efficiency drop comes from having roof collectors laid flat on the roof.  That seriously reduces their output.  It's all part of the fun with solar.  Lots of experimenting, searching for the most practical design, and getting free electricity form the sun.  I love it.

  • Thanks 1

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[postquote quote=180249][/postquote]

Pretty much, that's all correct.  But I think the biggest problem in connecting to your existing charge controller would be that it probably isn't rated for much more power than your roof solar is providing.  You'd run the risk of frying the charge controller on a sunny day and so you'd probably want to upgrade it.

 

If you're looking for the ideal solution, you would have a separate MPPT charge controller just for your portable panels (onboard rather than built into the panels).  Then you'd rewire the two panels of the portable unit so that they work in series, for 24 volts nominal, which would have less voltage drop with longer and/or lighter gauge cables.  24 volts would also provide more voltage for the MPPT charge controller to work with, meaning it could operate more efficiently (the charge controller will output 12v to the batteries regardless of how you wire the panels).

  • Thanks 2

Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The peak voltage of the suitcase panels is 18 volts each.  Can a normal MPPT controller handle 36 volts input?

 

Wouldn't one have to have a closely matching peak voltage from the roof array to then tie the two systems together in parallel at the controller?

 

John


John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Elite1 with 200 watt PV on the roof. My MPPT Blue Sky controller is rated to a max PV input of 340 watts.

So my thinking is that I would be fine to wire in a remote 90 watt panel like this in to my existing system.  This would keep the distance from the controller to the batteries to a minimum, reducing voltage drop. And since the voltage from the solar panels to the controller is much higher, close to 18 volts, running a 20' x 10 gauge cable would not create as much energy loss to voltage drop. I'm no electrician, but this is what I have learned so far...subject to editing!

 

Dave

  • Thanks 1

2015 Oliver Elite, Hull 107


1998 Ford E-250, 5.4 liter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[postquote quote=180264][/postquote]

 

The first answer is that you have to match the controller to the panels, both in maximum voltage and amperage.  But, depending on what 'normal' is, I'd say yes.  The smallest charge controller that Victron makes, for example, is rated to 75 volts.  If you go to the web page for their controllers, they now have a calculator at the top where you can input what panels you have, how many in parallel, series, etc., and they'll tell you which charge controllers will work.  (But if I put in 2 100w panels in series, it tells me to buy their smallest controller).

 

The second answer is that you wouldn't want to combine a 24v panel and a 12v one to the same charge controller.  You could do it, but the voltage of the combined units would be limited to that of the lowest panel, and you'd lose half the power of the 24v panel.  But with two controllers, each will output its standard charge profile regardless of what's happening on the input side.  So from the battery bank standpoint, it doesn't matter if one array is 24v and the other is 12v - all it sees is the 14.4v (or whatever stage they're in) that the charge controllers are putting out.  Similar situation to having both a solar charge controller and shore power hooked up.

 

Here's a nice primer on the do's and don'ts of mixing panels.

  • Thanks 1

Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...