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Reading about the benefits of a softener and am convinced it could save you money down the line. Was wondering if they effect the taste? Do you install a filter down stream from the softener?  I'm guessing there are water filters and there are water filters from looking at the prices...$30 to $300.  So if you like to chew your water get the $30 unit or if you want artisan go for the $300. I'm unsure about such a big spread in price vs performance.  Maybe the water softener is all I need.  I'm also wondering if most people prefer to carry bottled water for drinking? Thinking just another thing to take. But don't know...first time.

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We’ve been using a water softener for the past few years.  I also use a filter before the softener, just a small Camco filter.  We also carry bottled water for drinking and coffee making.  We started with a big softener, 18K grain, I think.  It was heavy.  Last year I got a very small one, 3K grain that is very light and fits in the basement.  The big one is now used for car/truck/trailer washing.

Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram 2500 Laramie 6.7L Cummins Diesel

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MarkC -

With a human "system" that seems to be fairly sensitive to differing mineral content in water, I always use "bottled" water while on the road for drinking and cooking.  For the most part I buy gallon jugs in order to cut down on the plastic waste of all those one liter bottles.  If I'm drawing water into my fresh water tank from a reasonable source, I do not filter it since I'm only using it for showers and/or flushing the toilet.  However, if the source of the water is questionable (i.e. there appears to be heavy mineral deposits near or on the faucet or I'm drawing out of a stream or lake) I do filter the water while drawing it into the tank or Ollie.  For this filtering I simply use the standard "Camco" inline water filters that I get either at WalMart or Amazon.

Bill

p.s.  While hiking and/or fishing I usually carry a personal filtering system so that I can replenish my water supply on the go.

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2 hours ago, Mike and Carol said:

We’ve been using a water softener for the past few years.  I also use a filter before the softener, just a small Camco filter.  We also carry bottled water for drinking and coffee making.  We started with a big softener, 18K grain, I think.  It was heavy.  Last year I got a very small one, 3K grain that is very light and fits in the basement.  The big one is now used for car/truck/trailer washing.

Thanks for your input.  I'd read some suggestions putting the filter upstream of the softener.  Then others stated downstream which made me think the softener may effect the taste of the water.  I agree with you in placing the filter before the softener.  And thanks for the smaller softener size tip.  I tend to think bigger is better.  I think after a few camping trips I'll be throwing that theory out the window.

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1 hour ago, topgun2 said:

MarkC -

With a human "system" that seems to be fairly sensitive to differing mineral content in water, I always use "bottled" water while on the road for drinking and cooking.  For the most part I buy gallon jugs in order to cut down on the plastic waste of all those one liter bottles.  If I'm drawing water into my fresh water tank from a reasonable source, I do not filter it since I'm only using it for showers and/or flushing the toilet.  However, if the source of the water is questionable (i.e. there appears to be heavy mineral deposits near or on the faucet or I'm drawing out of a stream or lake) I do filter the water while drawing it into the tank or Ollie.  For this filtering I simply use the standard "Camco" inline water filters that I get either at WalMart or Amazon.

Bill

p.s.  While hiking and/or fishing I usually carry a personal filtering system so that I can replenish my water supply on the go.

Thanks for responding!  Over the years I became aware of how different the water tasted in different areas of the country.  Some good and some really bad. I'm going to use the bottled water method for drinking as you suggested.  And, just use the fresh tank for bathing and dishes.

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We carry our filtered drinking water from home in four 5 gallon, square containers that stack. They look like these, though we bought ours at a show years ago, and I have no idea of the brand anymore.  We have a cap with a spigot that replaces the storage cap.

I keep one on a stool outside the trailer, and refill our stainless water bottles and the tea kettle from the jugs during the day. 

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We tried regular bottled water but it is truly a pain to store and also dispose of the many used bottles. Gallon jugs are a little better. It all generates a bunch of plastic waste.

Last year this replaced the bottles. .... https://smile.amazon.com/Brita-36426-Everyday-Pitchers/dp/B07QD2CMWL/ref=sr_1_12?keywords=Brita+filter&qid=1576725119&sr=8-12

We use a stout clear plastic container (a 3 liter juice bottle) as a reservoir. We fill the filter with tap water from the sink and let it do its thing, it takes about 15 minutes. Pour the water into the other container, and refill the filter. The container fits in the fridge for cooling and transport. The Brita filter, empty, goes in the pantry top shelf. It just fits, vertically and rotated sideways. We do not travel with it there when it is full of water! 

The replaceable filter elements are good for 120 gallons or six months. I toss the used one in late Fall, clean and dry the filter housing and store it in the pantry until next season, when it gets a new filter element.

This has proven to be effective and the water tastes fine. Not counting the initial cost for the Brita, it costs $12 for a full season of drinking/ cooking water for two people. A full timing couple would probably go through several filters.....

John Davies

Spokane WA

Edited by John E Davies

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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