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Insurance & Roadside Assist


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I am lining up ducks for December pick up of E2.  Have questions based on your impressive experience(s) with insurance and roadside assistance:

-  Roadside:  I saw in a recent forum chain that some are happy with Good Sam and othres with AAA.  Have tracked other forums where it seems that GS  has gone through recent changes resulting in spotty customer results.  I am primarily investigating AAA or FMCA as a consequence but, who know???  Can find folks with legit complaints or enthusiasims about all.  Considering first hand experience and different formats, any thoughts?  Seems like some policies will cover trip interuption, medical evac, hotels/meals during lengthy repairs, allow for tows to prefered shops, etc...  

-  Insurance:  We are just starting down this road.  Have heard goood things about Hartford and Allstate.  Did you bundle with existing insurance policy?  I have progressive and it seems like an option.

-  Etended Warrantee:  Interestingly, some have opted to set up their own program by contributing the cost equivalent in an account.  Mixed results on that.  I would bet with a solid performer like Oliver and a well maintained TV, could be worth the gamle.  I have not yet looked into the new Oliver offering along these lines but it would be a hard apple to bite, caughing up a wad a cash to purchase a pricey EW for a brandy new trailer.  That said it sounds like the only way to lock in a reasonable cost is to purchase a EW when the vehicle is close to new and sign on for multiple years.

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3 hours ago, GAP said:

I am lining up ducks for December pick up of E2.  Have questions based on your impressive experience(s) with insurance and roadside assistance:

-  Roadside:  I saw in a recent forum chain that some are happy with Good Sam and othres with AAA.  Have tracked other forums where it seems that GS  has gone through recent changes resulting in spotty customer results.  I am primarily investigating AAA or FMCA as a consequence but, who know???  Can find folks with legit complaints or enthusiasims about all.  Considering first hand experience and different formats, any thoughts?  Seems like some policies will cover trip interuption, medical evac, hotels/meals during lengthy repairs, allow for tows to prefered shops, etc...  

-  Insurance:  We are just starting down this road.  Have heard goood things about Hartford and Allstate.  Did you bundle with existing insurance policy?  I have progressive and it seems like an option.

-  Etended Warrantee:  Interestingly, some have opted to set up their own program by contributing the cost equivalent in an account.  Mixed results on that.  I would bet with a solid performer like Oliver and a well maintained TV, could be worth the gamle.  I have not yet looked into the new Oliver offering along these lines but it would be a hard apple to bite, caughing up a wad a cash to purchase a pricey EW for a brandy new trailer.  That said it sounds like the only way to lock in a reasonable cost is to purchase a EW when the vehicle is close to new and sign on for multiple years.

Personally, we only consider extended warranties for vehicles with complex electronic components/drive trains where repairs are likely to be costly.  We have a BMW X5 with a diesel engine.  Better than average quality/build/reliability, but repairs cost an arm and a leg.  We do purchase the warranty, but this is, as you say, a gamble.  Historically our warranty cost has paid off.  When the screen on our 2015 BMW X5 nav sys began failing, the cost to replace would have been around $3,000 parts and labor.  Even after paying the $250 deductible, we broke even on the extended warranty.  

As for an Oliver, there is no drive train to fail.  Of installed components, the appliances are most apt to be problematic.  You can, however, get extended warranties on many of them (this used to be the case. Check with Dometic, et al.)  I feel the one or two year warranty on most equipment will cover any manufacturing defects and early life failures.  In the long run, you are better off paying for any eventual repairs.  It depends on whether peace of mind is worth paying up front.

Ray and Susan Huff

Elite II Twin "Pearl" - Hull#699; delivered December 7, 2020

2013 F350 3.2l diesel Super Duty 4x4 long bed crew cab

2017 Leisure Travel Van Unity Twin Bed (sold)

AZARCACOGAHIIDILKSLAMSMONENVNMOKORSCTNTX

States map oliver.jpg

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On 10/10/2020 at 2:32 PM, Susan Huff said:

Personally, we only consider extended warranties for vehicles with complex electronic components/drive trains where repairs are likely to be costly.  We have a BMW X5 with a diesel engine.  Better than average quality/build/reliability, but repairs cost an arm and a leg.  We do purchase the warranty, but this is, as you say, a gamble.  Historically our warranty cost has paid off.  When the screen on our 2015 BMW X5 nav sys began failing, the cost to replace would have been around $3,000 parts and labor.  Even after paying the $250 deductible, we broke even on the extended warranty.  

As for an Oliver, there is no drive train to fail.  Of installed components, the appliances are most apt to be problematic.  You can, however, get extended warranties on many of them (this used to be the case. Check with Dometic, et al.)  I feel the one or two year warranty on most equipment will cover any manufacturing defects and early life failures.  In the long run, you are better off paying for any eventual repairs.  It depends on whether peace of mind is worth paying up front.

After doing some additional research, we are taking your advice to heart on the extended warrantee stuff.  Seems like it's better in this circumstance just to "self insure" especially considering the reasons you've listed above.

Doing homework now on a policy to cover the Oliver.  Have a couple of quotes but it's hard to find good suggestions as travel trailer insurance seems to be a different animal than typical RV insurance.  Anyhoo, looking at Progressive, Good Sam and Farmers so just in going through the process, we should come up to speed.  Of course, any/all suggestions are welcome.

One thing we've come across are multiple suggestions that we get an additional roadside assistance policy even if one is offered by the insurance policy on the trailer.  The thought is that the specialized roadside companies do that best and offer more complete coverage including potentially covering associated costs like having to stay in a hotel, rent a car, towing longer distances, etc...  Seems like AAA may be the way to go there.

Thanks for the input.  Hope your maiden voyage next month goes well.

 

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I have AAA RV coverage with 200 miles towing. I have never needed the Roadside Assistance for the trailer, so I can’t say how good it is. I have been an AAA member for many decades, and only had a couple of calls for a flat tire and a wreck, both were not answered for many hours .....😢 in both cases I paid for a tow truck and then got reimbursed by AAA. No worries, it just pisses you off at the time.

I have full coverage with Progressive for $435 per year, and declined their RA coverage ($17) since I already had the AAA coverage. Be sure to look for full replacement (for 5 years) then after that they will pay you what you paid for the trailer. More than fair I think.

Of course rates vary wildly by state and city, your past RV experience, and if it is stored at a risky remote location or in your secure garage. Mine is out of sight in an attached RV bay.

John Davies

Spokane WA

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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Good info John.  I am probably going with Progressive as well so it helps to know that one can decline the RA for the trailer.  We are doing the same policy as you with AAA.  Also good to know that one can cancel their call if you find a quicker tow source on your own and try to get reimbursed for those expenses.  Our customer service person stated that those attempts sometimes get denied.

 

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We've had the good Sam's coverage on the trailer , both insurance and roadside, for over a decade. Have never, fortunately,  needed the tug and tow roadside or towing, but I  do know others have found it to be good, in years past. The premium coverage also covers us in Canada when we do Alaska deliveries. There is no mileage limit, just closest qualified repair shop. That can be a long ways in the Yukon.

Good Sam's gives a credit for layup time. We call in when we store the trailer, and call in again when we get back on the road in the spring. 

We've used the roadside for the vehicles a number of times. Response time has been good. 

 

Edited by SeaDawg

2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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