Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
John E Davies

Where to carry spare gas for the generator?

Recommended Posts

Would a couple of stacked Rotopax work on top of the rear bumper beside the spare tire without blocking any lights? Perhaps mounted sideways?

 

How much room is there on each side of the tire cover, could an Ollie owner please measure?

 

http://rotopax.com/L-Bracket.html

 

Just thinking about some mods, once I get one..... I am not interested in carrying fuel inside the truck or trailer, or in front of the trailer where it would get blasted. The back porch of the Ollie looks as if it is crying out for some added equipment.

 

Thanks.

 

John Davies

Spokane WA USA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We carry the generator (a Honda 1000 to charge the battery) in the truck bed, under cover. With the solar power, we rarely need it, and don't carry fuel most of the time.

What is your tow vehicle? I can definitely understand not wanting to carry fuel inside an suv.

Most vehicles we've seen in the Yukon, Alaska, and Australia carried jerry cans in a roof rack. Or on a rear bumper of the trailer or campervan. The roof rack seems to be the prime spot.

Sherry

  • Thanks 1

2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I carry a 2000 Watt Honda plus 5 gallon gas can in the generator basket. The gas was needed last Summer when we had fog and cloud for a week at Mount Pisgah.


Current 2007 Airstream Classic Limited 31


2015 Oliver Legacy Elite II (Sold)


2016 Ram 2500 HD 6.7i Cummins turbo diesel


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are conversion kits available to convert your Honda generator to LP, or I think actually they're multi-fuel, so that too might be an option. A google search will get you a handful of options - no idea if any are better than others.


Snowball • LE2 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't like carrying gasoline anywhere other than the vehicle's gas tank. Cans mounted on the outside of the car or trailer are a live bomb in a collision. We solved the problem with a dual fuel generator and an LP quick disconnect option from the factory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree with what's been mentioned. I converted over my Honda generator to propane as I did not want to carry gas in the truck. The company I went with is GenConneX, this conversion is propane only, I am extremely happy with it, as I am not good about maintaining old gasoline that isn't used enough. There is another company that does a tri-fuel conversion, I can't remember the name, it is easy to find if you search the airstream forums, there are long discussions about them there.


Randy


One Life Live It Enjoyably


2017 F350 6.7L SRW CC LB


2015 Oliver Elite II Hull #69

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use military Scepter fuel and water containers that we carry in the back of the truck.  They are hard to find (not "available" in the USA), expensive but totally safe.  They are made to military specifications and subjected to UN transport code classification tests. These canisters have proven themselves for their ruggedness and durability offering options for fitting with various accessories.  They are the only containers certified safe to carry on board aircraft while filled with fuel.  The plastic construction prevents fatal explosion risk when the canisters are hit with shrapnel or projectiles; in fires they may eventually burn with the fuel, but no instantaneous explosions caused by pressure build-up as is the case with metal fuel cans.

 

Water Canisters

 

Like fuel, a potable water supply to the soldier in the field is an essential link in the supply chain.  Scepter's Military Water Canisters (MWC) are made to military standards with dimensions similar to the MFC.

  • Thanks 1

Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I converted my Honda 2000 to propane with a Central Maine Diesel three way kit.  It will run on gasoline, LP, or Natural gas.  The only draw back is you lose some power with LP due to lower BTUs per gallon.  I need to install a quick connect to the Ollie to complete the process.


Current 2007 Airstream Classic Limited 31


2015 Oliver Legacy Elite II (Sold)


2016 Ram 2500 HD 6.7i Cummins turbo diesel


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The military style scepter or classic jerry can is sort of the standard for the overland crowd, with the rotopax coming in a close second.  I've always wondered why more people don't use the 5 gallon utility jugs that they use for off road racing.  There's got to be a reason that the racing crowd prefers those over jerry cans, though I don't know what that would be.


Snowball • LE2 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The military style scepter or classic jerry can is sort of the standard for the overland crowd, with the rotopax coming in a close second. I’ve always wondered why more people don’t use the 5 gallon utility jugs that they use for off road racing. There’s got to be a reason that the racing crowd prefers those over jerry cans, though I don’t know what that would be.

I  use a couple of steel NATO cans and they are great. I think the guys that use the plastic jugs do so because their $60 jerry cans would disappear from the fuel truck. I lock mine with steel cables (filler cap to cable, then cable to trailer).

 

I think these cans are way too big for an Ollie, though they would look cool. I think a couple of 2 or 2.5 gallon Rotopax would be very OK. They can be locked, using a Rotopax adapter.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not want to convert my generator to propane since I want to be able to use it anywhere away from a propane supply. I like an independent power source. What if I run out of propane?

 

Thanks for the suggestions.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm revisiting this topic. Any other comments or suggestions?

 

I may be changing tow vehicles eventually, to a Land Cruiser 200, and I like the idea of carrying 10 to 15 gallons of extra gas on the Ollie.  The idea being, we drag the trailer back into the boonies, disconnect the trailer, top up the fuel tank on the Cruiser and go off to explore. I wouldn't normally need to carry extra fuel directly on the truck, and that would require an aftermarket bumper with can racks, an expense that I do not wish to make, or an expedition roof rack, ditto....

 

Maybe I should just carry two or three steel NATO cans on the tongue, on a heavy plate where the generator box would go? I don't think much of the location due to the extra tongue weight and the messy environment, but maybe that makes the most sense. It would certainly make the cans much safer in the event of a collision.

 

Mounted on the tongue, it would be possible to pump the gas directly into the truck, without having to take them off and manhandle them, which is always a painfully awkward experience. This might do the trick...

 

IMG_4794.jpg.c5cb021c7aee7033d4c7d40362f0ef78.jpg

 

https://www.amazon.com/Gastapper-Electric-Gasoline-Transfer-Equipment/dp/B01MS4T9OD/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1486503788&sr=8-1-fkmr1&keywords=12+v+fuel+transfer+pump+gt+Max

 

Thanks for any suggestions, other than "convert your generator to propane" ;)

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could convert your truck to propane.

 

Take a look at the Frontrunner jerry can holders.  The two-can version could probably be mounted to the tongue much like the generator basket, or the single can versions could probably bolt right to the rear bumper.  Since they have a full bottom plate, you might be able to mount them lengthways on the bumper to keep them out of the way of the lights.  I'm sure they'd hang over a bit of course.  ARB makes something similar.

 

If not that, then I'd think any Smittybilt type jerry can holder could find a home either on the bumper or the tongue.

 

If you want to mount to the side of the tongue, these holders from AT Overland might protect the cans a bit better.

 

How about a Cam Can for the spare tire?

 

If you can mount a motorcycle luggage rack to the top of the LP cover, then these are cute.  That would work for a small generator but not much fuel for your truck.

 

What about just stuffing some rotopax into the bumper or behind the LP tanks?  I bet you could figure out how to strap them in there without them bumping around too much.


Snowball • LE2 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What about just stuffing some rotopax into the bumper or behind the LP tanks? I bet you could figure out how to strap them in there without them bumping around too much.

I had actually thought about that, for the generator, and I have ordered a pair of access hatches for my build, to start in about ten days! I think I could get a couple of the two gallon Rotopax in there through a side hole, but that isn't near enough fuel to use for topping off the truck.

 

Also, I am concerned about adding a lot of tongue weight since with a Land Cruiser I would not be using an equalizing hitch off pavement. It can take a max of 850 pounds deadweight, but I prefer to keep it at about half that. I guess that if I mounted two cans on the tongue, and two on the Ollie's bumper, it would balance out..... when all the cans were either full or empty

 

It would also give me a certain amount of ballast control. For example, if the propane tanks are full I could leave the front cans empty and carry full rear cans. If the propane and the water tanks are low, I could carry full cans on the tongue. Kinda like a movable water ballast system in a racing sailboat. ;)

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

 

 

 

 


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could, but as always try to limit the amount of weight you're placing on the far ends of the trailer.  Can you do air bags or stiffer springs on the Cruiser?


Snowball • LE2 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to carry 2 of the honda 2000 watt generators in the basket and would like to carry a 5 gallon plastic gas jug. Not sure where.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You could, but as always try to limit the amount of weight you’re placing on the far ends of the trailer. Can you do air bags or stiffer springs on the Cruiser?

Sorry I missed thiis earlier.

 

The Land Cruiser 200 is rated at 780 to 850 pounds tongue weight, depending on model year, but it is softly sprung and really needs airbags for stability. I would rather not mess with airbags but if you want to retain the cushy factory ride they would be a great choice.

 

An alternative is to install stiffer suspension and better shocks like the excellent Old Man Emu kit with either medium or heavy rear springs, depending on how much fixed load is normally carried. I would add Front Runner drawers, spares and heavy recovery gear to be carried always, so I would choose the HD springs.

 

The 200 will tow an Ollie beautifully. Here is an excellent article with lots of tech info.

 

https://forum.ih8mud.com/threads/towing-with-a-200-series-toyota-land-cruiser.932343/#post-10406612

 

It's no Raptor off pavement, but it is supremely capable and can comfortably  travel washboard at relatively insane speeds (without a trailer!) without falling apart like most vehicles. It has fantastic articulation in back and can get through most trail obstacles that the bumpers will clear. Just don't expect it to be a desert race truck. No jumps!

 

I finally got to test drive one a couple of weeks ago and was very impressed. It is dead quiet, very solid and powerful. The 2013 and later models have the multi-view camera system which is a great thing for negotiating trails or even hooking up the trailer. They also have a slightly better feature list than the earlier models, like HIDs and multi- terrain crawl control.

 

Great trucks!

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have to carry 2 of the honda 2000 watt generators in the basket and would like to carry a 5 gallon plastic gas jug. Not sure where.

Plastic jugs are simply not safe, especially when carried in an exposed location. A steel Jerry can would be much better in terms of not leaking out the filler cap,  or splitting wide open in a collision.

 

If you had to choose plastic, Rotopax are the best choice. But there is a reason the military uses steel.... they work.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to carry 2 of the honda 2000 watt generators in the basket and would like to carry a 5 gallon plastic gas jug. Not sure where.

Plastic jugs are simply not safe, especially when carried in an exposed location. A steel Jerry can would be much better in terms of not leaking out the filler cap, or splitting wide open in a collision. If you had to choose plastic, Rotopax are the best choice. But there is a reason the military uses steel…. they work. John Davies Spokane WA

 

John, this information is simply outdated and incorrect. I did extensive research on fuel cans several years ago when I realized the primary manufacturer of the classic metal "jerry can" stopped production due to CARB compliance issues in the US. The Scepter Military Fuel Cans are in fact so superior to the traditional metal jerry cans that the Canadian military, the U.S. Armed services and NATO abandoned the metal cans years ago (in the early 1990's) and use only Scepter Fuel and Water Cans for their fuel and water transportation needs. These cans will not explode in a fire like the metal cans would. The Scepter fuel can is quite simply, the safest most reliable fuel can available on the market today.

 

I have seven of the fuel and two of the water containers and I can tell you they absolutely do not leak. You can carry them upside down if needed. I pack them inside the enclosed bed of our Sierra and never smell gasoline.

 

There are several drawbacks to obtaining and using them. You absolutely cannot buy them from a dealer in the US as they are intended for the military and exempt from EPA and CARB regulations. They can be found new and used on E-Bay. They are expensive, require a special spout and a special wrench to open them.

 

The Rotopax system is a quality product and as best I can tell, the Rotopax Fuelpack’s largest size is four gallons and costs around $100.00. I would say their best claim to fame is that they are EPA and CARB compliant if that sort of thing matters to you.

 

You don't have to take my word for it you can read about them here.

 

 

 

 


Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John, this information is simply outdated and incorrect. I did extensive research on fuel cans several years ago when I realized the primary manufacturer of the classic metal “jerry can” stopped production due to CARB compliance issues in the US. The
are in fact so superior to the traditional metal jerry cans that the Canadian military, the U.S. Armed services and NATO abandoned the metal cans years ago (in the early 1990’s) and use only
for their fuel and water transportation needs. These cans will not explode in a fire like the metal cans would. The Scepter fuel can is quite simply, the safest most reliable fuel can available on the market today. I have seven of the fuel and two of the water containers and I can tell you they absolutely do not leak. You can carry them upside down if needed. I pack them inside the enclosed bed of our Sierra and never smell gasoline. There are several drawbacks to obtaining and using them. You absolutely cannot buy them from a dealer in the US as they are intended for the military and exempt from EPA and CARB regulations. They can be found new and used on
. They are expensive, require a special spout and a special wrench to open them. The Rotopax system is a quality product and as best I can tell, the Rotopax Fuelpack’s largest size is four gallons and
around $100.00. I would say their best claim to fame is that they are EPA and CARB compliant if that sort of thing matters to you. You don’t have to take my word for it you can read about them

Thanks very much for the info. I agree 100% that Scepter cans are wonderful if you can stomach the cost, but there is nothing wrong with using high quality steel NATO  cans. I was cautioning mfantich to not use a "plastic jug". My steel cans are 30 years old and the only thing I have done to them is touch up the outside paint and add new gaskets. As you pointed out, you won't find Scepter fuel cans sold at any USA source because they are not CARB legal. There are many sources for legal and affordable milspec steel cans. I can't recommend the $30 Chinese knockoffs in any way.

 

Watch the torture test video at the bottom. It includes 2 minute flame testing but they don't leave it in a burning environment until it blows up.

 

http://www.roverparts.com/Parts/JC3009

 

A good source for good (but not the best) steel cans follows, but these are not CARB legal and are labeled Not For Fuel. They also have gaskets and spouts, and free shipping if you order a set of four cans. These are slightly thinner steel but still certified, unlike the Chinese junk.

 

http://deutscheoptik.com/cart.php?m=search_results&headerSearch=Y&search=Jerry+can

 

I've seen countless pics of jeeps and overland rigs and I can't recall ever seeing Scepter fuel cans on the back or roof. That isn't to say they would not be a terrific choice, but there is no need to get that extreme to have safe and reliable fuel storage.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

 

 

  • Thanks 1

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We carry both our gennies and extra fuel in the bed of out truck.  We went with extended fuel tank setups like this -- different manufacturer -- for convenience, and love them.

 

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200402013_200402013?cm_mmc=Google-pla&utm_source=Google_PLA&utm_medium=Generators%20%3E%20Generator%20Accessories&utm_campaign=IPI%20Industries&utm_content=213800&gclid=Cj0KEQiAxeTFBRCGmIq_7rGt_r8BEiQANdPqUnUXA7Hagsx7hI76dxUvTjA5kNcQ3u930I3MdeWaT7gaAk8b8P8HAQ

 

Works well for both transport and running the generators.


zz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don’t like carrying gasoline anywhere other than the vehicle’s gas tank. Cans mounted on the outside of the car or trailer are a live bomb in a collision. We solved the problem with a dual fuel generator and an LP quick disconnect option from the factory.

 

Yep, I did the same thing. I think that is the way to go.

 

  • Thanks 1

J-Rhett


Oliver Legacy Elite II (Irog)


1995 Ford F-250 x4 Turbo Diesel


Trek Bikes, Hobie Cat Kayak

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have to agree with what’s been mentioned. I converted over my Honda generator to propane as I did not want to carry gas in the truck. The company I went with is GenConneX, this conversion is propane only, I am extremely happy with it, as I am not good about maintaining old gasoline that isn’t used enough. There is another company that does a tri-fuel conversion, I can’t remember the name, it is easy to find if you search the airstream forums, there are long discussions about them there.

 

We are interested in getting a small Honda generator and possibly converting to propane but can't find any local Honda dealers willing to do it. Did you buy the generator from GenConneX or do the conversion yourself?  How much power do you lose with propane? How about at altitude? We routinely camp at 9-10,000 feet.  Would a Honda 1000 be adequate for just keeping batteries topped on rainy/cloudy days?  We don't use a ton of electricity and have ordered the 320watt solar panels. Would really love  not to have to carry gas for the generator, especially since we ordered both propane quick connections for our Oliver ????.

 

Thanks,

<p style="text-align: left;">Yvonne</p>


Yvonne & Doug


2017 Legacy Elite II, twin bed


Hull #223


2017 Ford F-250 Lariat, crew cab

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had purchased a 7000is EFI, to power the house in case of emergency (aka: New England weather) didn't want a stationary Kohler so I could take it with me when we move. Has worked out perfectly, now it's locked in the bed of the truck, except to have the oil changed. Now if I expect bad weather I just park next to my outside house connection.

 

I did the conversion myself, with the kit they sent, super easy with good directions, took about 1.5 hours, I don't tend to rush. I didn't buy the Gen from them as that wasn't the plan when purchased, propane only came about with the trailer and travel.

 

I wouldn't hesitate to buy the finished setup from them, then they will warranty the whole thing. They also offer you sending then your Gen and they will convert it for you.

 

I can't speak to elevation, I don't have the experience with it.

 

As to power loss, I haven't noticed any difference in the running of the generator.

 

The solar setup on the Oliver is very strong, on a cloudy day with the trailer under a tarp, still charged at 1+ amp. You would have to be in some horrible conditions to need very much supplemental​ Gen for battery charging I would think a 1000 or 2000 would be more than adequate (but not to run ac)


Randy


One Life Live It Enjoyably


2017 F350 6.7L SRW CC LB


2015 Oliver Elite II Hull #69

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...