Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Raspy

Ongoing mods to Hull #92

Recommended Posts

My list of modifications is getting longer and some of these seem pretty important.  So I thought I'd start this thread.

 

One of the first ones was the stainless steel countertop with Corian side splash and IKEA faucet: countertop.thumb.jpg.b2f608153515689377c4d51267f7e31a.jpg

 

The next is the Heavy Duty suspension kit and 3200 lb Star Wheel upgrade.  This was prompted by breaking a wheel and wanting greaseable suspension links.  I broke one of the Oliver wheels while it was on another trailer and discovered how thin they are:star-wheels.thumb.jpg.25f754a04015c373264f00b1a7ac3627.jpg

 

The next next was the spare tire modification.  Mine came with an undersized spare and to fit the full sized tire I had to go to a soft cover:

spare-tire-lock.thumb.jpg.6b93aaa75c5699d8d2b45a73083cd555.jpg

spare-tire.thumb.jpg.1cb3a1a332fbad65b7ab1d33711df30b.jpg

  • Thanks 9

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The next is the 30 lb propane upgrade and quick disconnect:

unnamed-21-1.thumb.jpg.43048a271877d6ef191ddadc2417682b.jpg

unnamed-22-1.thumb.jpg.b8284c2c0322859cc457cf68409e6e44.jpg

  • Thanks 1

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The next is the water tank fix:

 

I designed a dip tube and spin welded a fitting to the top of the tank to install it.  This fixes the problem of not being able to access all the water in the tank.  It works.

tank-ftg.thumb.jpg.809e1c0ba1e9c73a4d5f1047728a73b0.jpg

tank-mod.thumb.jpg.f0649c559ba551f697f03f46272382e6.jpg

  • Thanks 3

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The next is the center TV mount that flips up for travel.  Thanks to Windwalker for this idea.  I used an aftermarket bracket and added a loop of 1/8" nylon cord to help hold it up during travel:

unnamed-23.thumb.jpg.00dd89d00d29f0ae069e97829f90c914.jpg

  • Thanks 2

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The next one is the 12 volt ground wire fix.  Maverick mentioned that his was not charging from the tow vehicle and I found out mine wasn't either.

 

So, while tracing it out I discovered the umbilical ended under the front dinette seat and only had a two small white wires that went somewhere, but not to anywhere that grounded the system.  So, I extended the white wire in the umbilical cable with a #10 to the ground buss under the rear dinette seat and then from the ground buss I ran two #10s to the frame grounding lug that is close to the buss.

 

This fixed the problem and now the tow charges the trailer batteries.   It also properly grounds the brakes which seemed to be grounding only through the trailer ball to hitch!  This fix may help those with Fords that have been chasing an electrical gremlin related to the brake controller

  • Thanks 2

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The next is the new front logo.  These decals are easy to order and very durable.  This one is based on a picture of our coyote "Sandy" as she howls.  Beautiful.coyote-logo.thumb.jpg.245c5fb22e78e0453e5916e0adc68558.jpg

unnamed-17.thumb.jpg.191a0241188b3d79b04c0abcab60e769.jpg

  • Thanks 3

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Next is the jack stand modification.  I started with three jack stands.  I threw away the adjustable center pieces and cut off the ratchets.  Two of them got modified to flat on the top with a piece of 3" channel.   These are the rear jacks .  The other one got modified to accept the front jack, with a piece of 2" diameter tube.

 

This works out very well where the ground is nearly level, or they can be set on blocks, if needed, on slopes.  They are very strong and stable.   Much better than stacking a pile of blocks.[attachment file=73096]

[attachment file=73099]

  • Thanks 3

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John,

Your coyote logo is perfect! I can’t wait to show Clair your jack stands. Do you have an problem finding space to stow them?

  • Thanks 1

Clair & Kathy Reed - plus our travel companion: Emma


2017 Legacy Elite II - Hull# 245


2014 Ram 1500 3.0 V6 Eco-diesel 4x4


ALFLGAILINIAKYMIMONCOHPATNVAWVWIsm.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kathy,

 

The jack stands stack, so they take up less space than the previous set of random blocks.

 

Thanks for the comment on "Sandy".  She is the most interesting and smartest dog I have ever known.   Pure coyote from the wild and extremely healthy.  We raised her from two days old and she blossomed into the most amazing friend, teacher, ambassador from the wild and trickster I could ever imagine!  Just incredible.  Her story was documented as she grew and now has an international following with about 100,000 views and many comments.  This has lead to an ongoing discussion about them and some very interesting input.  I'm always looking for more information about coyotes from those with personal experience and I share the link to her story with anyone interested.

 

Her and I played for many many hours.  Chasing and rolling around on the ground.  Snarling and play biting, playing keep away, going on mock hunts to train her and see if she could support herself.  We traveled thousands of miles in the pickup, visited friends, camped out, went into supermarkets and restaurants, and generally developed her into an ambassador.

 

I'm slowly  writing the book about her and I can hardly express how powerful the experience was.  A once in a lifetime chance to have a very intimate relationship with a wild animal.  Not just any wild animal, but one extremely intelligent that interacted with us and could outsmart us, while at the same time accepted us as her pack and actually lived with us.  She is a normal dog, with a twist, that makes her extremely interesting.  She fit in to our world and retained her identity at the same time.  I could go on and on.  If you'd like the link, I'll send it to you.

 

Meanwhile, where we live, here in Northern Nevada, the coyotes (probably Sandy's siblings), travel around at night and we  often hear their songs.  They all have different voices and they bring life to the quiet high desert nights.  When I hear them I often go out at night, in the dark, and sit still to listen.

unnamed-4-2.thumb.jpg.fbb0ef96cc65f76334d30a89b336fe86.jpg

DSC09962.thumb.jpg.3bf5f3b3ed52c6df3981996acc9ae754.jpg

  • Thanks 1

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John

 

Sandy reminds me so much of our white Timber Wolf we had back in the late 80's and early 90's.  Her name was Marabou and she was an amazing animal to own.  She rarely barked but did she ever love to howl.  We would often have a "group" howl.  It got to the point that all it took to get her started was to pucker my lips, close my eyes and throw my head back.  Seeing Sandy has brought back many fond memories.

 

Scan1227.thumb.jpg.5cb11bbee484edfea9b01cc18e033eff.jpg

  • Thanks 2

Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to read Sandy's story.


Chris & Duke Chadwell
🐾Maddie & Baxter🐾
Elite II Hull 292
2017 F-150 Lariat 3.5 EB 4x4 Lakeland, FL 

 

2019TravelMap.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would love to read Sandy’s story.

 

Here is the link to Sandy on tractorbynet.com

 

http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/rural-living/238908-found-coyote-i-think.html

 

This is a forum thread that goes on for a lot of pages and has some great pictures.   When you get up to pages 25 -29, or so, I wrote some conclusions about the experience and why we could not keep her and about the trip to Southwest.  I hope you read these and give me some feedback about the whole experience.  What is the real difference between a wild dog and a domestic dog?

  • Thanks 3

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Raspy,

 

Started reading your story on tractorsbynet, very interesting. I used to be on tractorsbynet a number of years ago, but not lately, even forgot my user name and password, plus I sold the tractor when we moved to VA.

 

Stan

  • Thanks 1

Stan and Carol


Blacksburg, VA


2014 Dodge Durango 5.7 Hemi


2014 Legacy Elite II Standard  Hull 63

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is the link to Sandy on tractorbynet.com http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/rural-living/238908-found-coyote-i-think.html This is a forum thread that goes on for a lot of pages and has some great pictures.   When you get up to pages 25 -29, or so, I wrote some conclusions about the experience and why we could not keep her and about the trip to Southwest.  I hope you read these and give me some feedback about the whole experience.  What is the real difference between a wild dog and a domestic dog?

Raspy, I'm to page 13 & only stopped to switch to my laptop. Your story about Sandy is wonderfully written, captivating, refreshing, heart-warming & I'm going to cry, aren't I?

  • Thanks 1

Chris & Duke Chadwell
🐾Maddie & Baxter🐾
Elite II Hull 292
2017 F-150 Lariat 3.5 EB 4x4 Lakeland, FL 

 

2019TravelMap.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

At the risk of going off the rails here with a story unrelated to Oliver trailers, I will tell you that I met a woman whose father, as a boy, had a coyote.   I anxiously asked her to get more information and get back to me about his experiences.  After a few weeks, I saw her again and asked her about it.

 

Her disappointing response was that she couldn't get anything from him as he didn't want to talk about it.  Why? I asked.  What's up?  After a bit of probing, the answer became clear.  He was in his 90s then and his mind was clear.  It had been about 80 years since his experiences with that dog and he remembered it well.  The problem was that it was so painful for him that he refused to revisit it.  I was silenced and will never forget that response, mainly because I understand it completely and it's the same for me in the intensity.  I'll openly talk about it, but for at least two years I could not do so without my voice breaking and having to stop to regain my composure. Even writing this I feel that emotional, physical grip.  An unsatisfiable dilemma.  The outcome I want, to live, learn and play with her as I would and do with my other dogs, can never be realized.  She did no harm, but must be locked away.  She is the most interesting and fun dog ever, but can't come home.   She could do immeasurable good for her species, but precious few will ever know she lived.  And finally, as my years slip by and someday someone asks me about a coyote I used to knew, what will I say that really conveys the story in a way that is worthy of telling?

 

This is where I'm stumped:  The combination of an independent and highly intelligent friend from the wild, that completely accepted us as her family, while being playful, inventive and responsive, and while living a very tenuous life, is incredibly powerful.  She was and is, all in, full of life, emotional, loyal, fun loving, independent and completely oblivious to the dangers that could cost her her life at any moment.  Dangers that domestic dogs don't face.  She lives in the moment and yet plays games and has habits that reveal a much deeper understanding than I ever expected.  My fear of losing her in a stupid way was a strong driver in my efforts to secure her future and protect her.   I, at once, played openly and joyously with her and watched very carefully for ways to help her.  All while studying her, learning from her, writing about her and sharing my experiences of living with her.  Sharing in a way, hopefully, that would never jeopardized her, but would reveal her goodness and value.

 

We've settled on an difficult compromise.   She is safe.  She is emotionally and physically cared for.  Has medical care when needed.  She has been given the opportunity to select a mate and found the perfect one amongst the offerings.  She has chances to interact with her keepers and volunteers who are also amazed by her and spend time with her.  But she will never run free, singing her song into the night as she prances with her siblings and pals.  She will never have pups.  She will never live the life of a wild coyote.  She is physically perfect, but she is generally understood to be disabled in that she has never demonstrated affective hunting and she is not afraid of people, only cautious with them at first.  So therefore, she cannot be released and will live her life in a sanctuary.

 

As an ambassador, she is amazing.  The folks that care for her have never seen anything like it.  First, she is incredibly healthy because we figured out what she needed for nourishment and supplied it in abundance.  Wild rabbit is her favorite. Second, she has never been under stress, so she is mentally stable.  Third, she is used to people and after a short standoff, will climb right up into your lap.  Imagine being able to sit and pet a coyote, or have one in your lap, or have one challenge you to a game, or walk with you, or come and get you in the morning to begin another fun filled day.

 

While reading the story, listen to the firsthand experiences of some of the caring writers about their love of their dogs.  Notice the knee-jerk hate of coyotes that drives some of the posters who are unable to learn from what is right in front of them.  And the real experiences that have lead to others hating them for good reason.  Understand why Sandy could have been taken at any moment by a bullet or a county official.

 

Sandy's story was never meant to convince the reader that all coyotes are harmless or friendly, but it is intended to show there is a lot more to these dogs than is generally understood.   To show the good that is never seen.  To reveal some of the intelligence that underlies their famous "trickster" behavior.  To report on the development of a tiny pup from a couple of days old and nearly frozen, to a mature dog.  She has eyes so powerful that they see intention in those around her because she sees subtlety and studies it.   I've been breaking new ground, trying to show how much more there is to these fascinating song dogs than what is commonly perceived.  During it all, and over the last 5 1/2 years, she has never been dangerous.  A lot of eyes have been opened.  Nobody who has ever met her, has forgotten the experience.  Here is one of my favorite questions: "what is the difference between a coyote and a domestic dog?"

20882192_10212558594872615_1176084231502530526_n.jpg.cec0d1ec5a1b0d3bd0a28748c991849c.jpg

  • Thanks 3

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the link to Sandy’s & your adventure together. Clair & I are going on a trip so it will make some fine reading for me. I’m a dog lver, thru & thru so I can understand the love & admiration you feel. Thank you for sharing your story.


Clair & Kathy Reed - plus our travel companion: Emma


2017 Legacy Elite II - Hull# 245


2014 Ram 1500 3.0 V6 Eco-diesel 4x4


ALFLGAILINIAKYMIMONCOHPATNVAWVWIsm.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's nice to see the picture, I guess I can't see the pics in the story because I'm not a member? Anyway I've seen a few of them but the sock pic is great! You should post them all on your profile page :)

 

Reed


Happy Camping,


null


Reed & Karen Lukens with Riffles our Miniature Poodle


2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Standard, Hull #200 / 2017 Silverado High Country 1500 Short Bed 4x4


Past TV - 2012 Mercedes-Benz ML350 4Matic BlueTEC Diesel


Click on our avatar pic above to find the videos on our Oliver Legacy Elite II


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
At the risk of going off the rails here with a story unrelated to Oliver trailers,

Thank you for sharing Sandy's story. You bared a part of your soul to complete strangers & gave us a riveting glimpse into a world very few of us would ever experience. I have so many thoughts and questions that I don't know where to begin; however, for now, in honor of Sandy & in reference to this thread: http://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/a-group-of-olivers/  I want to change my vote to a "Band" of Olivers.

 

Chris

  • Thanks 2

Chris & Duke Chadwell
🐾Maddie & Baxter🐾
Elite II Hull 292
2017 F-150 Lariat 3.5 EB 4x4 Lakeland, FL 

 

2019TravelMap.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have lived with a coy dog for six years.  I found her living in a cave at the base of a sacred Indian mountain.  She was five months old.  She hung out with me while I did some landscape photography.  I decided to take her with me. That night I snuck her into my motel room after buying a collar and dog food.  She loves people and has been a great companion.

 

 

06E3656D-C97B-4A62-BDD4-2AC1EF988363.thumb.jpeg.dcd4ec015e32293e70846cdec9c928fd.jpeg

  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hellsbay,

 

Thanks for your note.   I've been hoping to find a coydog for years.


John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Raspy, how has the steel counter top been holding up for you?  Did you make it yourself or have someone do it for you?  Kudos if you did it yourself; it's a very clean job.  Was it installed directly on top of the fiberglass or did you put anything down first?  Do you put hot pots on it, not caring about the stuff underneath?  Any other thoughts you can share or things you would do differently?

 

I read your story about Sandy.  How amazing that you had this opportunity in life.  I love coyotes (maybe because I don't own any livestock) and although I have no direct experience with them I was always struck by their intelligence.  Just having locked eyes with a few over the years.  You could feel them analyzing you beyond a base fight or flight, hunter/prey decision.

  • Thanks 1

2018 OLEII #344   |   2018 Ford Expedition


AZCACOGAKSMONMTNWYsm.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rumline,

 

Thanks for the kind words.

 

Yes, coyotes are incredible animals.  Those yellow eyes can lock-on and look for intention.  Much more than simple sight.  She would start a game and then challenge me to respond to her moves.  She understood what we were doing and what we wanted her to do without training.  We were all part of a pack that lived and travelled together.  I often thought of her as a relative that had come to visit.  Lot's of interaction, but also independent.  Or like a cat that retained a lot of independence, but she found her place in the family and added an immense amount of joy and character to our world.  So much of getting along with her was understanding her hard-wired character and her outlook on the world.  She is the smartest and most fun dog I have ever had.  We would wrestle and chase and play games for hours every day.  We built a bond and a trust that helped her with her natural caution or wariness, when facing new challenges or meeting people.  Through it all and now at about 5 1/2 years old, she has never been a threat to anyone.  It was a real heartbreaker to let her go, but given the circumstances, Southwest Wildlife is the perfect place for her to be.

 

I designed the counter top, had the piece sheared and bent and then installed it myself.  The material is 14 gauge, 304 stainless with a polished finish.  The sink and stove holes were made with a 4" grinder.  #10 screws and nuts hold it in front and along the back.  It is glued down with paintable silicone.  It is holding up very well and was put down directly over the white fiberglass counter top after that was scuffed up with a scrubby pad and then de-greased.  It is thick enough and glued almost continuously underneath, so it does not dent.  We set hot pots on it, within reason. It was designed to be very durable and used hard.  Stainless will always show some character from sliding iron pots on it it cutting on it, etc, but that's fine.  It will never wear out and is far more durable than the stock countertop.

 

 

  • Thanks 3

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided to install the 2 5/16" coupler on Ollie as others have done.

 

This isn't necessary for my gross weight but I have several other trailers with the larger ball and it's more convenient.  Also. there is no question that the larger ball will be plenty strong enough.

 

Interesting that the strength of the two couplers looks nearly the same, even though they are rated way different.  Both the same steel channel piece and just a larger ball socket.   I am always having trouble stepping over the tongue on Ollie and getting hung up on the handle that opes it.  Not anymore, I hope.

 

Also, the strain is so high at the bolts, that it had actually began to elongate the holes in the coupler a bit from the shearing force.  There are two grade 8 bolts that pinch the piece against the aluminum tongue.  The holes through the tongue are larger and have inserts to take the compression load, but the nuts bottomed at the end of the threads before getting to full pinching force.  The fix was to simply add another washer under the nuts.

Bulldog-1.thumb.jpg.18f7d69bf4dd409f3bc263d54679bc8e.jpg

Bulldog-2.thumb.jpg.818314ef7ba7e418ecfee55e71296cdc.jpg

  • Thanks 2

John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This fixed the problem and now the tow charges the trailer batteries.

Last month, when we were getting our Ollie training we were told that the tow vehicle only maintains the batteries, it doesn't charge them. Remembering your mod, I confirmed what he said. Is "maintaining" what you mean or is your tow actually charging your batteries?

 

Thank you again Raspy for all these great suggestions!


Chris & Duke Chadwell
🐾Maddie & Baxter🐾
Elite II Hull 292
2017 F-150 Lariat 3.5 EB 4x4 Lakeland, FL 

 

2019TravelMap.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...