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Interior Window Screws Broken Off


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So amongst a variety of other issues I've found in my 2017, this broken window screw thing got my attention this morning.  I've read the thread above and am just reviving it and asking for more current advice.

We had a low of 39 last night and we slept with the furnace set to 62.  This was our first time using the furnace since we got ILOVHER in May.  It worked perfectly and we were comfortable but woke up to two wet beds near the back of both windows.  I will admit that I had little ventilation and hadn't thought to crack a window.  (probably fireside wine induced, lol)   We had some decent condensation on the interior back windows.   We're slightly nose high (1 degree) and the water was dripping out of the missing screws holes I found after removing the shades.  FYI...EXTERIOR WINDOW WEEP HOLES HAVE JUST BEEN THOROUGHLY CLEANED prior to this trip.

I decided to try to remove a couple other interior screws and they are ALL SHEARED and can't be reinstalled due to the breakage and misalignment.  I guess I'm now going to have to do an operation on all of them!  Has anyone got a better solution to this inner trim ring issue?    

My assumption is that if you have INTERIOR condensation and it drips..there's no other channel for the water to go and those open screw holes just leak onto the beds..   That back window is tight to the first interior window track/channel and if it's any more than just a little fog..you're going to leak!  Since we were tipped the back open screw holes were the culprit.   

What is the best way to proceed?  I'm a bit irritated...although I know now to crack a window and dehumidify!

Edited by csevel
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2020 Toyota Tundra TRD Sport 5.7L V8 

2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Hull #184 ~ "ILOVHER"

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We’ve got a bunch of sheared window screws.  I haven’t done anything to repair, it doesn’t seem to affect the windows much.  We haven’t had a condensation problem because we usually have both vents open, it’s one of our set up tasks so even if fireside wine is consumed we’re good.  Mike

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Texas Hill Country | Elite II #135 | Ram 2500 6.7L

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No other opinions on this?  I guess I thought this would generate some more interest and/or ideas.🤐 

Last night.. I took all of the gaskets out of the windows AGAIN (including the window track gasket) and thoroughly cleaned them.  I will always vent a window or the MaxxAir fan lid when heating the inside.  Lesson learned. 

However, I'm still getting condensation ONLY beside the beds near the wall NOT underneath.  Any remedies for this?

My plan is to just plug the inner frame screw holes with something that won't let water seep through.

2020 Toyota Tundra TRD Sport 5.7L V8 

2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Hull #184 ~ "ILOVHER"

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@csevel, I didn't comment,  because broken screws have not been a problem for us.

You might try taping blue shop towels beneath the lower window frame to see if that's the actual source of the moisture.  My honest guess is, probably not, unless it's been very humid where you are.

When temps go from 6os or 70s to 30s in wnc, we get some moisture on the walls, near our heads, if I forget to turn on the exhaust fan to a high enough setting.. From breathing. I wipe that off in the morning with a microfiber towel. Pull the cushions away from the hull for awhile to breathe. We've never had condensation under the cushions, and the walls are a pretty rare instance. 

In my older trailer, those inside screws are numerous,  and they hold the inside and outside flanges together, with a clamo betwern. A few missing is fine, probably.  But I'd  replace them over winter, were it me. I don't know about your windows. Mine are original 2008.

 

2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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4 hours ago, csevel said:

However, I'm still getting condensation ONLY beside the beds near the wall NOT underneath.  Any remedies for this?

As you probably already know - our trailers are reasonably prone to condensation, particularly in areas near moisture producers such as "humans".  This topic in various forms is fairly common.  A few years ago there were owners experiencing moisture buildup beneath and to the sides of their beds.  The "solution" for this was to purchase what I though was a very expensive "breathable matt" similar to the one that Oliver currently sells as an option.  Since I happened to have some "foam board" like THIS I decided to give it a try in order to reduce the temperature variation between the bed and the other surfaces. 

Now, six years later, I can say that I've never had a single moisture problem either under or on the sides of the bed.  I cut one piece of the board to fit the area under the mattress and cut two more such that they would run along the straight sides of the mattress and come to the top of the mattress.  Finally I cut three relatively short pieces the same height as the last two and taped them together such that they would conform to the radius of the curved section of the wall.  If anyone is interested in a picture of this I can post one tomorrow.

Bill

p.s.  If you decide to do this mod then don't forget to cut a small place in the edge of the foam board where you can get your fingers/hand under it so that you can easily grab it to get access to the hatches.

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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2 hours ago, topgun2 said:

 Since I happened to have some "foam board" like THIS I decided to give it a try in order to reduce the temperature variation between the bed and the other surfaces. 

Now, six years later, I can say that I've never had a single moisture problem either under or on the sides of the bed. 

Please post pics. Rigid board is completely closed cell, meaning it is waterproof and doesn’t breath, even a tiny bit, which is the type you used. I am actually surprised it proved to be effective, after 24 hours of soaking my test scrap absorbed no water. Wouldn’t an open cell or grooved material be better, to allow air to flow under the mattresses? I had to wedge this in place, it would pop out like a cork from a champagne bottle otherwise….

E0225606-D1BF-4162-8E71-484E3B3DB323.thumb.jpeg.042c0cd633500f1ed99911a827633fd7.jpeg

At the very least, I think using a compact circular saw to cut a bunch of shallow channels on the side that contacts the mattresses might be prudent. I have never heard of a “vented” foam board, but you could certainly make your own😬

I don’t have any moisture/ mildew issues, but I live where the humidity is very low, and I also have wrap around waterproof mattress covers, so body moisture or wall condensation cannot migrate into them.. 

John Davies

Spokane WA

 

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

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OK - pics coming later today.

However, don't mix apples and oranges.  MY purpose of using foam board is/was to reduce the temperature differences so that there would not be a surface that was cold enough for moisture to condense versus what JD is basically talking about in improving air circulation so that moisture can evaporate.  

Ideally, both of these approaches can be used to combat condensation.  However, as I pointed out, I decided to see if the relatively low cost method would work before taking additional measures involving airflow.

JD's "soak test" in his post above is a bit of a waste of time in that at least both sides of most construction foam board that I've seen is covered with a thin sheet of plastic which would , obviously, prevent virtually any water from penetrating into the foam - let alone the density of the foam itself.  In this regard and to certainly prevent the intrusion of water of any kind, I even went further and sealed all of the cut edges with clear tape.  This also has the added benefit of keeping things a bit cleaner and helps satisfy that OCD nature that is not the private domain of virtually anyone.

Bill

2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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Thank you for your responses.  Everything suggested seems logical to me.  I have a hard time with the Hypervent and Den-Dry products as they seem expensive for what it is.  I read on Fiberglassrv that the material used is nothing more than stucco rainscreen or waterway drainage material but doesn't come in small rolls.   I think I'd like to try some other materials first to see what works as I feel like everything 'Oliver' ends up being over a $100 mod.   I really haven't had any moisture UNDER the mattress, just on the streetside 'side'.  I put a 200w mini desk heater in the basement last night just to see if there was improvement and there was ZERO condensation this morning.

This leads me to believe that that side of the trailer is more exposed to the cold since the water heater and furnace are on the curb side.   I looked inside the basement and I'm baffled as to why there are partitions blocking any heat transfer to the vulnerable areas of the backside plumbing lines and streetside.  I wonder if I should cut them away a bit so heat can move to that side more freely.  I've seen the mod to the furnace where ducting was added and laid on top of the plumbing however,  I think this beyond my skill level.

The question about moisture is a good one for all travel trailer owners and I had my share from the single pane windows in my Casita.  I guess  I thought double pane would somehow not fog up this much, but I will definitely vent more in the future.

I have decided not to pull the inner trim ring from the window as I don't want to create more problems.  I think I'm going to plug the lower screw holes with something like caulk or rubber plugs to just prevent dripping out of them.  I really like the idea of the pipe cleaners for wicking out of the weep holes and will add them to my arsenal.  

I  want to study more real world cold weather camping as that's why I bought this trailer ..to extend my camping season in the Northeast.  Condensation is probably a fact of rv ownership but I'd like to reduce this and protect my investment and custom mattresses as much as possible.

Any other suggestions are always welcome!  Thank you!

 

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2020 Toyota Tundra TRD Sport 5.7L V8 

2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Hull #184 ~ "ILOVHER"

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I went on line and bought my hypervent directly from a retail establishment instead of going to Oliver. Although a little expensive, well worth the investimate to protect my very expensive KTT mattresses.

My experience with the hypervent has only been this spring, summer and early fall. Summer in New England was very humid this summer. I also crack open the two ceiling vents at night when the Ollie is occupied and the heat is running. Happy to say I have not had any moisture problems, other than one morning when a little moisture formed on the windows one cold night (but no dripping) when I forgot to open the main cabin vent but the bathroom vent was open and bathroom door was left open. That was my lesson learned moment and I made sure the main vent was open each night after that.

2018 Oliver Elite II, Hull #354 | 2018 RAM 1500 Rebel 4 x 4, 5.7 Hemi

 

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6 hours ago, topgun2 said:

As promised - here are a couple of pics of the foam board installation.

Bill

 

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I like your idea, Bill. Bringing the insulation up on the sides should help. A friend of mine uses reflectix for the side, all the way to the windows, in her Casita,  and reports success with that, too. 

I've actually never had an issue with condensation on the bottom of the cushions. Just the sides, and side of bedding at the head. Breathing, I'm sure. And that's only in humid, warm days to cold nights kind of weather. Twice this fall  mild condensation, eliminated with a paper towel. We've been in WNC pretty much since mid April. 

I have thought about making a "crib bumper" for late fall/winter camping, more to keep me warmer in my spot next to the hull. We have no way of heating the interstitial space between the hulls, in a 2008, without opening drawers and hatches. I drew a pattern last year, reflectix sewn to microfiber quilt, but I never got it done,velcroed around my curved side of the bed. Too busy with other projects this year. Maybe this winter. .. we'll see.

This fall in wnc hasn't been that cold, nor many drastic changes, so I guess I lucked out, so far. Most nights I've been too warm, rather than too cool.

@csevel the little 200w heater was probably a great idea. There are safe, explosion proof  heaters made specifically for inter hull heat, called bilge heaters. We do have one, but have never used it in the Oliver, as we have rarely had electricity. Only used it on the boat. 

 

 

 

2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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I also think the wraparound moisture proof mattress enclosure could be a good idea. I have a moisture proof mattress cover, but open to the bottom.  If I did full enclosure,  I'd want to know the mattress was totally dry.

Do you have twins, or king?

2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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