Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
dbp05ret

City Water Connection

Recommended Posts

Defective batch of fittings... maybe.  But I think there most likely is an entirely different cause.  As a reasonably adapt Mechanical Engineer, I can think of at least one other cause for several trailers to have the same problem.  And, I can also think of a reason that others with the same batch of parts would not.

 

I have hull 342.  When I picked up my Ollie II, OTT provided a small brass "Flow Restriction Device" (FRD).  I would wager that  #381 and #390, and #412 as well as a whole bunch of other hull numbers have the same device.  I suspect that some of those that have had this problem were using the OTT FRD at a trailer park with very high city water pressure when the problem occurred.

 

If you look at the OTT provided FRD, it simply is a small orifice between a male and female hose bib fittings.  This is NOT a pressure regulating valve (PRV).  WHY?  Because such a device under no flow conditions will sill allow line pressure at the faucet to be seen inside the trailer.  Granted as you open a faucet in the trailer, the device will restrict flow and as such the pressure inside the trailer will also be reduced due to having an open valve.  But if you have 125 PSI at the camp ground water source, and are not using any water in the trailer, the pressure inside the trailer will likewise be 125 PSI.

 

IMHO, the OTT provided FRD is a piece of junk.  Using it is tantamount to playing Russian Roulette with your plumbing system.  The only use I can think of for this device is to use it as a trout line weight.  If you have one of the OTT provided FRD's, I STRONGLY recommend you do one of two things.

 

1.  Buy a real Pressure Regulating Valve (PRV) such as the one like John D. suggested.  (See picture below that he posted).

 

2.  Don't use the city water connection.  Many OTT owners use the fresh water fill port to fill our fresh water tank and we use our pump to supply our needs.  Since we don't use the city water port, we have not blown out our plumbing.

 

I recommend that OTT put out a TSB to have all OTT owners trash their FRD's and to purchase a PRV OR, not to use the city water connection.

 

I also recommend that OTT not provide new owners with FRD and give them real PRV's.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water-Pressure-Regulator-41231288-C4EB-47C5-A725-E2035D1818D9.jpeg.059087adbfb2a573a261315768e91315.jpeg

  • Thanks 4

Tug:  2019 F-150 SuperCrew Lariat, 3.5L EcoBoost, Max Trailer Tow, FX-4, 4X4, Rear Locker


http://visitedstatesmap.com/maps/ARCACOIDKSKYNENVNCOKORTNTXUTVAWYmed/visitedstatesmap.php


 


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used it the very first time that I tried the City Water Connection. On this very first trip, I wanted to make sure that I tested all aspects of the Oliver since it was under warranty. When I picked up the Oliver it was winterized and I camped in it for 2 days at David Crockett SP. I did not de winterize until I had been in Florida a few days.  I used fresh water tank the first few days and then decided to try the city water connection. I used the Pressure Regulator Valve (PRV) from the beginning at 20 psi. When it immediately started leaking from the weep holes, I went back to the fresh water tank and have been seeking input ever since. Darryl


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Geronimo John,

 

Yes that certainly makes sense. I was using the factory supplied "regulator" and I noticed my fresh water tank volume was increasing. (over a few days) I had surmised there was blow-by in the pump- or somewhere else.  This would be very similar to what happens at your home when high water pressure causes your toilet to run. I once had municipal water pumping  120 psi overloading the toilets, a regulator set at 70 psi fixed it. Duh!

 

This thread certainly points to that direction - get a real pressure reducing device, set appropriately, and see what happens - or just as many do- use the fresh water tank, run your pump.

 

RB


Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"

ALAZARCACOFLIDMTNVNMOKORTNTXUTWAWYd56201524964bac5483378b34b491562080842sm.jpg

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really don't understand this conversation. To say don't use the city water just use the fresh water tank and pump doesn't make much sense. Your paying big bucks for this trailer to have both options. And they should work equally . The pressure regulator that Ott provides.  is a factory preset pressure regulator and are widely used with no problem. They may have gotten a bad batch. It happens, not the fault of Ott. Of course if there is a leak from pipes/ connection then yes Ott problem. To spend big dollars for a fancy regulator with gage and adjustment knob is just personal preference  I have used the brass type and the plastic type for years no problems. And always keep a spare just in case.

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t really know where the pressure regulator conversation came from other than the op had his set very low. If he has a leak, excessive pressure is an unlikely cause. More likely a bad installation or freezing.

 

The comment above is correct however that what Oliver supplies isn’t actually a pressure regulator. It may help with hammering but not prolonged high pressure. Though I really don’t know how much it matters. I have a nice pricy stainless regulator and use it, but only to protect against back pressure on the pump (and also because I have a weak pressure valve on my water heater that I need to replace). If the system is properly put together you’d probably need a pressure spike of over 500psi to pop a fitting. Even then probably only to the press fit fittings, which, disregarding the mess, you could just slide back on. The other stuff I’d bet would take prolonged pressure of 750psi plus, which is what it would take to actually burst a pipe. PEX and crimped fittings are tough, and resilient to transient pressure spikes.

 

The real enemies of your plumbing are freezing temps and vibration.

  • Thanks 4

Snowball • LE2 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am experiencing the same problem.  I have had my Oliver since October 2018 and this problem only developed during the last week.  I tried turning off the fresh water pump and draining the faucets completely before reconnecting the city water line, but water still immediately starts flowing out of the weep ports at the rear of the trailer as soon as the water is turned on.  I haven't yet had an opportunity to check whether there are any broken pipes so will be doing that tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried my city water connection again when I recently arrived at a new campground on our 5 week 5 state shake down trip. Water immediately started leaking from the weeps immediately upon turning the city water on. After reading some of the previous post, my guess is that there is either a bad batch of connections or a highly motivated employee who is applying to much force during assembly. Either way, I know it will be fixed when I take my Oliver in for another issue on March 18.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious? Although I can't be much help I haven't gotten my unit yet I was told, and at the factory tour that most all the components can be accessed from any where in the trailer. If you have that much water leaking out the weep holes on city water, you should be able to see the leak from somewhere. I will be very interested in the outcome. It will be on my list of things to check at  delivery.  Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The views of our customers are of paramount importance to Oliver Travel Trailers. We will always strive to provide the best possible customer service and to identify and address all legitimate questions and concerns relating to our products or services. Oliver Travel Trailers values its customers points of view as a part of the “Oliver Family”.

 

The Camco 40055 Brass Water Pressure Regulator is by its nature a flow restriction device as most pressure regulators work in this manner.

 

Any water pressure regulator may be subject to failure. Failures are normally caused by a manufacturing or mechanical defect or physical damage.

 

The Camco model 40055 has a preset water pressure (between 40-50 PSI) on the outflow side. This protects the camper’s plumbing from high water pressure that may be present at the supply and which would cause damage to the trailer’s plumbing system if left unregulated.

 

This water pressure regulator is designed to ensure a safe pressure on the inside of the camper even when there is no flow but this device does not equalize to the higher pressure when no flow is present.

 

Camco and other manufacturers make other water pressure regulators that are adjustable in nature and have a pressure gauge built onto the body of the regulator.  Both fixed and adjustable pressure regulators perform the same function in broadly the same manner but one is adjustable and can have a visual reference to the reduced water pressure.

 

Personal preference may dictate which one any particular customer may ultimately find preferable, but both do safely perform the pressure regulation function.

 

In an effort to reinsure confidence of the 40055, we selected a random sample of three pressure regulators from inventory and subjected them to testing.

 

The test method employed was a water pressure test with a supply pressure of 100 PSI produced buy our water pressure testing equipment. (All campers are subjected to an 80 PSI pressure test of the water lines as mandated in the RVIA Testing Regulations). A water pressure gauge was attached to the low pressure side of the regulator with water in the valve, 100 PSI of water pressure was applied at the inlet, the outlet recorded a pressure of 44 PSI, +or- 2 PSI on all three valves tested. This method of testing simulated a zero flow and did not result in an equalization of pressure to the higher inlet pressure. Furthermore when the 100PSI was disconnected from the inlet, the valve maintained the 44 PSI on the low pressure side until the pressure was relieved by removing the gauge (similar to opening a faucet).

 

The observed testing appears to support the premise that the pressure regulator Camco 40055:

Regulates incoming high water pressure and regulates it down to the stated safe pressure range of the regulator (40-50 PSI).

There is no equalization of pressure between the two sides of the regulator under water present but no flow conditions.

When high pressure source is removed, the lower pressure is maintained on the low pressure side of the valve until relieved by such things as the operation of a faucet.

Our tests indicate that the Camco 40055 water pressure regulator performs its required function of reducing water pressure. As previously stated, this valve does not give the ability to adjust water pressure or give a visual representation of pressure, which may be the preference for some and a matter of personal choice.

 

The manufacturers of the Camco 40055 water pressure regulator are happy to discuss any concerns that may arise in respect of any of their products. They can be contacted by phone at: 1-800-334-2004 or by email at: info@camco.net

  • Thanks 11

Matt Duncan

Director of Marketing, Oliver Travel Trailers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stand corrected then.  I didn't actually receive a pressure regulator when I picked up my trailer and was told that the one supplied was a simple restrictive flow regulator.  I blame the internet.

 

That aside, I still don't think this was a water pressure issue.  I think it's a check valve is located where it can easily freeze issue.

 

Matt's post completely distracted me from work (doesn't take much) - so poking around, I ran across this comparison test of RV pressure regulators.  Interestingly, they found the Watts to have the worst flow rate, which of course is the opposite of what most people will tell you.  They found the Valterra High Flow Stainless regulator to have the highest flow rate, but the only two they didn't like was the Watts and a cheap plastic model.

 

Honestly, I've never considered the flow rate of the regulators to be much of a concern, other than a general 'more is better' attitude.  I've assumed that the faucets and shower heads are more restrictive than the regulators, so in real use, it wouldn't matter.  However, in our experience the onboard pump definitely produces a better flow than our city water connection, so perhaps the regulator is the culprit.

 

 


Snowball • LE2 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That aside, I still don’t think this was a water pressure issue. I think it’s a check valve is located where it can easily freeze issue.

My best guess as well, and very easy to verify....

 

Dave


2015 Oliver Elite, Hull 107


1998 Ford E-250, 5.4 liter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to clarify one issue. I picked up my Oliver on December 12, Oliver had winterized the RV. I did not dewinterize until I was in Florida and temps were in the 50's as the low. If it is or was a frozen check valve, it happened while supposedly winterized in all areas or it wasn't winterized properly or it is a very vulnerable area.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see now where you mentioned that before - thanks for clarifying.  Please let us know when you find the problem and what it was.

  • Thanks 1

Snowball • LE2 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are brass fitting in the basement area just inside of the city and fresh water inlets.  I have had both split and leak when introducing water.  Oliver replaced both under warranty. I was told that there was possibly too much teflon tape on the fittings and they were tightened too much causing the leaking. Hull #381.  If you need to eyeball these, you must remove the back wall of the basement and the black rubber mat from the floor and then pry up the floor.

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...