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New owners: how is the Quality Control of your rig? Grade it!


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I apologize in advance for the wordiness of this post.  This has a chance of being my swan song here on this forum so I'll just let it go.  This is a good thread and I'm glad John, a new owner started it.  It seems Reed and Karen do have a serious problem that seems related to their build, but also from reading through this forum a good chance exists that Oliver will figure it out and help them correct it.  I don't believe this thread or ones similar should "scare" a prospective buyer even a newbie to the scene such as myself.  What should scare anyone  is the thought of of purchasing any RV and believing (or being told) like most modern automobiles or trucks, they are pretty much trouble free and require little to no maintenance or repair.  Nonsense.  I have been diligently researching this lifestyle for the last 2 years.  Reading, going to shows, renting Cruise Americas and talking to owners in campgrounds and at events.  They ALL have issues.  Every bleepin one of them.  It is common in the industry.  Cars and trucks don't have complex electrical, plumbing, water heaters, inverters, solar controllers.  Neither do most smaller boats (under 26')  Has anyone priced new boats as of late?  20' Boston Whaler over 100K!  As toys go, and these things are toys although some folks want them to perform like homes, there is a lot of stuff crammed into them.  That plus the fact that they are hand built, are pulled or driven all over creation lends itself to problems that all brands experience, albeit some more than others.  My brother paid almost $2 million  for a custom Prevost Luxury Coach conversion.  It had problems/issues, 1 of them 12 grand worth on a major component just out of warranty.  My neighbors 2 doors down downsized from an older Tiffany MH to a new Jayco TT that they paid under 15k for.  Guess what? It has issues and has been to the dealer 3x and most is worked out with some other things fixed by him.  Oliver is no different.  What sets them apart from the consumer grade pack is cabin/body/frame design, and their commitment to customer satisfaction.  But even they can lay the occasional bad egg.  It is a chance any of us take buying any RV.  Being connected to a company and/or dealership that takes into course of their business warranty work and a strong willingness to satisfy the costumer goes a lot longer in this RV world that waiting for the perfect unit to hit the streets.  We are leaning towards the Airstream FC 25FB Twin over the Oliver not because we think one is better built than the other but for our needs, camping plans and style, and preference.  Also right in our backyard, 40 minutes up the GSP (although they plan to relocate to a new facility 20 minutes further west within 2 years) is one of the largest AS dealerships in North America.  This is a family owned and operated dealership for over 15 years maintaining very large selections of AS trailers.  We have visited them twice, have researched their reputation 6 ways to Sunday, and almost everyone who has done business with them, raves about their commitment to customer satisfaction.  I know personally 4 owners who have bought and service their trailers there 2 of them second time buyers 1 of them 3 times!  Our last trip there we met a couple from VA. that were originally from NJ.  They are on their 2nd AS in almost 12 years and have traversed the continent.  They were getting tires changed and we spoke for a good time and they have nothing but great things to say about this dealership, Airsrteams they have owned, and the problems that come up.  Their experience taught them that it takes a full season of good use, to get the bugs worked out.  They are glad to be only 5 hrs away and always have there rig serviced here bypassing several closer dealerships.  I like the idea of having a responsive dealership close to where I live.  Although Oliver has a record of getting repair work done for customers at general RV dealerships nationwide, what happens if you encounter an issue unique to Oliver's design that a general facility cannot or will not handle?  A trip to TN to get it fixed is what I can see.  In summation I believe that one first finds something that truly fits their own style and preference.  Out of the 2 or more 'brands' for lack of a better word, make the decision based on economics and other less tangible but very important aspects like service/repair availability and manufacturer/dealer reputation.  Because all TT's, Fivers, and MH's will need it now and then.  Familiarize yourself with your specific unit, be attentive to maintenance especially PM, and go forth and have fun.

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Excellent post Chixter :)

 

We were that close to buying the 25fb ourselves but we needed the 4 season ability of either the Oliver or the Bigfoot. All 3 are good trailers and we made the right choice for us with Oliver, they stand behind everything and that says a lot :)

 

On another note, I'm moving my works on the water tank over to our blog. I took pics tonight when it ran out at 38%

 

Reed

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Happy Camping,


null


Reed & Karen Lukens with Riffles our Miniature Poodle


2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Standard, Hull #200 / 2017 Silverado High Country 1500 Short Bed 4x4


Past TV - 2012 Mercedes-Benz ML350 4Matic BlueTEC Diesel


Click on our avatar pic above to find the videos on our Oliver Legacy Elite II


 

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Another problem that may fall into the "quality control" category is an apparent lack of caring on the production floor in the mechanical area.  The problem with the incorrect drawer screws that were stripped out during installation and the stainless steel bumper bolt that was cross treaded and powered all the way on with a power tool.  These show a lack of skill and a lack of caring.  The water tank problems may be something similar, since all units have the same design, but a few don't work well.  Oliver has a reputation problem with the interior, with customer pictures posted of chaos inside.  Drawers and contents strewn.  Cabinets open.  It's amazing how much damage a low level employee can do.

 

Poor employees can be very damaging to a company's reputation.  That and a lack of proper oversight may be the real problem here.

 

People cancelling orders may be overkill, but when someone spends this much for something, and they believe it to be the best there is, and then poor workmanship shows up, it's easy to feel taken advantage of.

 

Oliver should probably stop production for a few days, review the recent problems and why they happened.  Take a look at all production methods, and make it clear that they expect good workmanship and common sense from the workers.   Review the tools used and how they are used.  Then it becomes the managers problem to properly oversee production and attitude or aptitude.  Quality is far more important than quantity.  How many sales have been lost because they used the wrong length of wood screw in the drawer slides or stripped some out?  Who should have known better or cared more?

 

Oliver is in the throws of growing.  This process is difficult and requires a lot of working capital.  They are having to meet a big demand and refine their design.  Solving mechanical issues, quality control and a myriad of design issues related to electrical, mechanical and owner operation.  They are still small, but trying to get bigger and some of the things they do are still what they did in the beginning.  Many things look like they just decided to wing it or leave it up to someone that really didn't know what to do.  I applaud them for being creative and doing the most impressive glass work I've ever seen, but the behind the scenes work has to he right too.

 

Some of the comments I've read by new buyers and prospective buyers reveal an intolerant and impatient attitude that can only be fixed by eliminating the complaints.  Of course, some of the complaints are totally valid and should never have happened, but others are minor and still scared some new buyers.  Also, some of us don't mind working on things and tinkering, but many can not do this and don't want to.

 

Many folks become indignant if they can detect something is different than they expected.  I deal with this attitude too in my business.  The best thing to do is do your best, own the mistakes, and have a good working relationship with your customers.  Word of mouth can make you or break you.

 

I'm thrilled with mine.  Elite 2 hull number 92.  But it is by no means perfect and I can't expect it to be.  But it is very, very nice and worthy of staying in the family for generations.  That is, with my patience and some tinkering.

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John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

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I never liked the position of the TV and did move it to the center above the nightstand about 6 months ago. Now, it folds back flat when not in use and is no longer in the way. Mike

Did you post a thread about this? If so, can I have a link? If not, please start a new one. I would like pics and part numbers....

 

Thanks,

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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I've got all the parts and am ready to move my TV too.  Great mod and not too hard.

 

John, you can find it under modifications.  Here it is:

 

http://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/tv-relocation/

 

 

 

The kit is a "Mount-it!"  TV Ceiling mount Model number MI-4211/CM211

 

 

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John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

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Problems of this sort are inevitable in manufacturing.  If a business has a good idea, or a good product, implementation becomes the issue.  Profit depends on production, but production must meet quality standards.  Quality standards slow production, but eliminate future problems such as reputation and warrantee issues.  Behind the scene, they must improve the workmanship and the procedures.  Find ways to standardize.   Predict human use and emotional response to their design.  The car industry is a good example to look at.

 

To Oliver's credit, they seem to be genuinely interested and responsive to their customers.  They absolutely stand behind their trailers.  Without that, they would fail in short order.

 

Managers are driven by pressure from above to get things done, but take the hit when problems arrive.  Good managers understand the production staff and the hands on work.  They can balance the pressure to meet unrealistic schedules with the realities of quality work.  Poor managers just try to whip the troops and get product out the door.

 

If anything, I see there are few engineers involved here.  Mechanical stresses,  electrical loads and practical human use patterns are, maybe, just dealt with by "what do we do with this?", on the production floor.  The trailers are slowly evolving as driven by cost and a gradual understanding increase in seeing what is being ordered.

 

Without getting too critical, remember, I like mine and I'm glad to have it, I can see room for improvement in some areas. The electrical system is one,  which would ease production issues, ease changes in orders, ease service and be more reliable.  I have to do some upgrades, where I can, on mine.  They seem to have upgraded their wheels now and I'm glad. (I already did mine).   There are a couple of potential issues with the older style, so I'm glad Oliver implemented an upgrade.  I also consider the heavy duty greasable suspension upgrade to be important, (not the E Z Flex) it should be standard equipment in my opinion.  Even though it would add a few dollars to the production cost, it would save rebuilding the system later and make the trailers tow better longer.   Remember, these are advertised as "Legacy" trailers.

 

I don't see any of the issues they are having caused by a "cost before quality" attitude.  If anything they go out of their way to build the best they know how to.  Then they improve as they need to, and they guarantee their work.  I don't want to pile on and beat them up in any way.  And again, I really like mine.

 

The water tanks are designed and installed in such a way that they will always have some character.  Very low profile and long.  But they also give excellent ground clearance and freeze protection.  The underside of an Oliver is better than any other trailer I have seen.  No hanging down pipes.  Great design.

 

Looking forward to the water tank resolution.

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John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

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Problems of this sort are inevitable in manufacturing. If a business has a good idea, or a good product, implementation becomes the issue. Profit depends on production, but production must meet quality standards. Quality standards slow production, but eliminate future problems such as reputation and warrantee issues. Behind the scene, they must improve the workmanship and the procedures. Find ways to standardize. Predict human use and emotional response to their design. The car industry is a good example to look at. To Oliver’s credit, they seem to be genuinely interested and responsive to their customers. They absolutely stand behind their trailers. Without that, they would fail in short order. Managers are driven by pressure from above to get things done, but take the hit when problems arrive. Good managers understand the production staff and the hands on work. They can balance the pressure to meet unrealistic schedules with the realities of quality work. Poor managers just try to whip the troops and get product out the door. If anything, I see there are few engineers involved here. Mechanical stresses, electrical loads and practical human use patterns are, maybe, just dealt with by “what do we do with this?”, on the production floor. The trailers are slowly evolving as driven by cost and a gradual understanding increase in seeing what is being ordered. Without getting too critical, remember, I like mine and I’m glad to have it, I can see room for improvement in some areas. The electrical system is one, which would ease production issues, ease changes in orders, ease service and be more reliable. I have to do some upgrades, where I can, on mine. They seem to have upgraded their wheels now and I’m glad. (I already did mine). There are a couple of potential issues with the older style, so I’m glad Oliver implemented an upgrade. I also consider the heavy duty greasable suspension upgrade to be important, (not the E Z Flex) it should be standard equipment in my opinion. Even though it would add a few dollars to the production cost, it would save rebuilding the system later and make the trailers tow better longer. Remember, these are advertised as “Legacy” trailers. I don’t see any of the issues they are having caused by a “cost before quality” attitude. If anything they go out of their way to build the best they know how to. Then they improve as they need to, and they guarantee their work. I don’t want to pile on and beat them up in any way. And again, I really like mine. The water tanks are designed and installed in such a way that they will always have some character. Very low profile and long. But they also give excellent ground clearance and freeze protection. The underside of an Oliver is better than any other trailer I have seen. No hanging down pipes. Great design. Looking forward to the water tank resolution.

I like and pretty much agree with everything you said here. It is reasoned and intelligent. Please elaborate on the heavy duty suspension, and explain why not the EZ Flex. That option looks like a good thing. And honestly, I have considered the alternatives to Oliver a couple of times, and I simply can’t bring myself to buy an Airstream, though my gf loves the extra width and how pretty they are on the inside. She has admitted that she can’t argue with the technical details that make the Oliver a better trailer. I haven’t seen a Bigfoot in person but the pictures and specs I’ve seen don’t compel me to find one.

 

The stock suspension has an equalizer to balance the load between the front and rear tire on each side by allowing the springs to change angle instead of flexing.  This allows the system to "step over" bumps without flexing the springs much or jarring the trailer.  It's good trick on tandem axles and it works well on uneven surfaces.  Then there are the shackle pins that deliver the load to the shackles and from the shackles to the frame.  The shackle pins and the equalizer pins are all working bearings that are constantly under load and completely exposed to the elements.

 

Dexter supplies this system in different configurations.  What Oliver uses is the dry nylon, non serviceable bearings.  Just nylon bushings.  These wear out before very long and allow metal to metal contact of the pins to the spring eyes and iron equalizer.  Then the wear begins to elongate the shackle pin holes.  After a while the whole system has lots of play in it and it gets weaker and weaker.  All of this takes a while, but I had a set on a utility trailer wear to an alarming degree and I began to look at other utility trailers, the same system as on our Ollies, to see how they were doing.  I've seen some that have worn to the point of being dangerous.

 

Dexter also has a system called E Z Flex.  It has heavy duty shackles, greasable bronze bushings and a different equalizer than our stock setup.  I've looked closely at it and it is nice, but in my estimation, isn't doing much or anything in this application to improve the ride.   It works where trailers are very heavily loaded with much stiffer and more massive springs.  In that situation it will compress a rubber donut to take some of the initial shock of a sharp bump.  In our trailers, the load is relatively constant and the springs are set up to be fairly soft.  Plus the overall load is not too much at only about 4,500- 5,000 lbs max without including the unsprung tongue weight.  I decided to get the kit for mine to upgrade the bushings and shackles.  So I went to a friend in the trailer business I've dealt with for many years.  He was very hesitant to order me the kit and said some of them have had the rubber fail. But, he said, we can get you the heavy duty kit instead.

 

Dexter also supplies the Heavy Duty Kit, part number K71-449-00.  This has a heavy duty equalizer (with bronze bushings and zerk fittings installed for greasing) instead of the rubber cushioned equalizer.  It has bronze bushings, new pins (drilled with zerk fittings installed for greasing) and heavy duty shackles.  This is the best option of the three as far as I'm concerned.  It is what Oliver should order their axles with from Dexter to minimize the additional cost.  There is no doubt this setup will hold up better than the dry plastic bushings.   The kit sells for about $100. less than the EZ Flex too.

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John


"I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt."


LE2 #92 (sold),   Black Series HQ19   

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We have always gone above and beyond to fix any issues our customers are having with their trailers and will continue with your help to make Oliver Travel Trailers the very best.  

This is certainly a true statement!  We've had a few issues and every one was addressed quickly and to our complete satisfaction.  Mike

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Texas Hill Country | Elite II #135 | Ram 2500 6.7L

ALAZARCACOFLGAIDILKSKYLAMDMSMOMTNENVNMNYNCNDOHOKSCSDTNTXUTVAWVWYsm.jpgALAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMAMS

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To the Oliver Family,

 

Even though we purchased our Ollie used and out of warranty, the first time we took the unit in for work Oliver took care of the minor problem for no charge. Made a long lasting impression on me when I told the Tech we purchased our Ollie used and he said when you purchased an Oliver, you joined the Oliver Family!

 

My Sincere thanks to everyone at Oliver TT for your continuous efforts to improve an already great travel trailer!

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Tundra LE2

 

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Thank you Oliver for addressing this thread directly! I have been out of touch for the past 2 weeks and was taken  by suprise at all that has been said here. I can say that Oliver hands down beats Casita and Bigfoot in quality! I have owned all 3. We thought we would  buy an Airstream or a larger stick built for our next trailer. We even bought a new truck with the power to tow whatever we choose. But after looking at Airstream and a few high-end stick builts, the construction quality was visibly and obviously lacking in them (sorry Airstream, in my humble opinion, you aren't what you use to be).

 

After we toured the Oliver factory we knew we had just seen the BEST travel trailer made in the U.S.. We ordered one and are very happy with our decision and our new Ollie. Are there things that need improving,  yes! Were there a few problems on delivery, yes! There always are. The difference is Oliver is commited and stands behind their product 100%.

 

They still have people working for them, not robots. And guess what, people sometimes have bad days or make mistakes are miss something. Tell Oliver! Give them feedback directly. Give them a chance to address it in the production line. Changes take time to implement.

 

And Oliver,  you need to post earlier if something does come up on the forums and tell us what you are doing to address the problem! I, for one, don't have the skills to fix the problems myself, but I do trust Oliver and believe they are commited to making things right and will, given time. I have seen it first hand.

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Yvonne & Doug


2017 Legacy Elite II, twin bed


Hull #223


2017 Ford F-250 Lariat, crew cab

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We have always gone above and beyond to fix any issues our customers are having with their trailers and will continue with your help to make Oliver Travel Trailers the very best.

This is certainly a true statement! We’ve had a few issues and every one was addressed quickly and to our complete satisfaction. Mike

 

The humor here, is that while reading Oliver's post that was exactly the same paragraph I was going to quote and comment on, pretty much the same way. So consider it seconded.

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Randy


One Life Live It Enjoyably


2017 F350 6.7L SRW CC LB


2015 Oliver Elite II Hull #69

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Some good thoughts Chixter.  One comment though...just because you buy the AS doesn't mean you will stop visiting this Forum.  I know I haven't.  Oliver is such a small family, and the members are such educated, free spirited folks you just don't find this anywhere else.  I have some good friends and mentors here and I value the relationships even though my egg is silver.

 

All the best.

 

Beware of filiform corrosion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Current 2007 Airstream Classic Limited 31


2015 Oliver Legacy Elite II (Sold)


2016 Ram 2500 HD 6.7i Cummins turbo diesel


 

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I know TG the folks interested in the Ollies are as unique as the product.  We are not 100% sold on AS yet.  We did some analysis using the current pricing I got from Anita vs a 2017 25 FC FB Twin.  We configured both as we would want them as you know AS doesn't offer a plethora of options as Oliver does.  An Oliver equipped as we would like it comes in at a tad under 67k.  And this is with a Dexter EZ flex not the good HD suspension some talk about here.   By the time we're done with NJ transfer registration etc we are at about 70.  The AS as equipped (solar, AGM, convection micro, awning pkg) has MSRP of 87,350. I've broken the ice on pricing off MSRP and realistically with taxes and tags we are about 75/76. They don't know it yet but I'm not financing I may be able to do a little better.  It's not an even money comparison, but not by much.  So it comes down to 1: Camping style/Intended use.  We are not avid boondockers, or should I say my wife isn't.  A day and overnite in a remote outpost is about her limit.  Most of the time we will be fully or at least partially hooked up.  We do not need the obvious biggest talent of the Ollie, full 4 season capabilities.  Our winter time use will consist of waiting for a couple of clear days, hooking up our winterized TT and hauling ass south...like the Keys.  We would activate our TT at the first stop in Dixie.  Reverse the order when returning.  2.  The advantage of having a very good dealership/service center within an hours travel has weight. 3.  Just some personal observances, 1 being room.  While visiting owners Stan and Linda, all 4 of us inside the trailer, 2 standing 2 sitting.  Felt kind of snug.  In the AS 4 adults sitting at the dinette with room for 2 more.  Makes a difference especially in periods of crappy weather.  There are other pros/cons to weigh and time will tell.  Which is why I will most likely be on this forum for a while.  We would make a decision very soon but for the time being we have to stick around.  Care of my elderly father in law prohibits us from travelling much right now anyway and we are still working f/t.  All things in time.  I like not being in a rush

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Chixter.  As one who has owned a Casita, Oliver Legacy II, and now an Airstream 28 I can say that all three products are good in their space.  We are absolutely loving the size of the AS, but there are trade offs.  Primarily in maintenance.  Fiberglass is impervious to corrosion and with no seams or rivets leaks are not a problem.  It all boils down to lifestyle.  You sound like me, enjoy the great outdoors but give me my comforts.

 

A couple of thoughts as you consider an Airstream.  Forget the factory solar option.  Waste of money.  The inverter they use is not sufficient to power anything more than a cell phone charger or the television.  If you must have solar get it done by a good residential installer.  I specified all my hardware and had SunFarm Energy in Pensacola, FL install it.  Saved a bucket load of money.

 

Having done the solar though I am not certain it was a good use of money.  A 2000 WATT Honda generator running on propane will recharge your batteries a lot quicker that 500 watts of solar.  The keys to boondocking are batteries.  That is the weak link in most trailers.  Take the money you would spend on panels and buy some Victron Lithiums.  More Useable Amps, less weight, and more charge cycles.  Forget the AGMs.

 

Last but not least.  Get the biggest AC unit out there.  15000 btu.  Or get two if available.

 

I hear 10% is a fairly common discount from dealers.

 

If you can find a used one in great shape even better.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Current 2007 Airstream Classic Limited 31


2015 Oliver Legacy Elite II (Sold)


2016 Ram 2500 HD 6.7i Cummins turbo diesel


 

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Here's a link to some great flexible Solar pannels.

 

http://www.windynation.com/Monocrystalline-Solar-Panels

 

 

Happy Camping,


null


Reed & Karen Lukens with Riffles our Miniature Poodle


2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Standard, Hull #200 / 2017 Silverado High Country 1500 Short Bed 4x4


Past TV - 2012 Mercedes-Benz ML350 4Matic BlueTEC Diesel


Click on our avatar pic above to find the videos on our Oliver Legacy Elite II


 

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Here’s a link to some great flexible Solar pannels. http://www.windynation.com/Monocrystalline-Solar-Panels

If you mount panels directly onto the roof, you trap the heat absorbed by the dark material. Elevated panels allow the heat to escape instead of being transferred to the roof. The hotter the panel, the less efficient, plus there is the possibility of it harming the roof surface.

 

A flex panel can't be tilted to face the sun, a minor issue unless you are parked long term and need to macimize their output.

 

They are nowhere near as durable and are easily scratched...

 

http://www.gonewiththewynns.com/flexible-rv-solar-issues-review

 

I think flexible panels look SO much better than big flat panels, especially on a rounded roof, and they don't have the potential to get caught on branches, but I am unsure about tacking them down hard against the roof surface, long term.... Ice damage? They would be self cleaning on an Ollie, which the flat ones definitely are not.

 

The flex panels at that link - they are listed as 12 volts, 17.8 volts open and 21.6 volts open. Which is correct and why publish so many different figures?

 

Thanks,

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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The Airstream guys were saying, skip the factory solar. My friend has them mounted on the roof of his Bigfoot. I'll get a few pics today. I watched the Wynn's review and read the article and their take said that they are perfect for the Airstream. We're going on the roof today to install the micro-air easy start on Goldilocks and will be checking our panels also. Personally, I like the flex panel and these may hold more heat being black but the roof is going to be too hot to touch mid summer anyway. What I also found interesting on that web site is the wind turbines that people are installing on their trailers.

 

I looked but didn't see the voltage differences that you did. I just saw the 12vdc after clicking on the panel in the link...

 

http://www.gonewiththewynns.com/flexible-solar-panels-rv

 

 

Happy Camping,


null


Reed & Karen Lukens with Riffles our Miniature Poodle


2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Standard, Hull #200 / 2017 Silverado High Country 1500 Short Bed 4x4


Past TV - 2012 Mercedes-Benz ML350 4Matic BlueTEC Diesel


Click on our avatar pic above to find the videos on our Oliver Legacy Elite II


 

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I went back and found it :)

 

They've got the maximums posted but it's still a 12vdc panel, I can ask Mark today then get back later :)

 

Screenshot_2017-06-13-07-07-00.thumb.png.339e19b6e3eeef45235618d3acb9488d.png

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Happy Camping,


null


Reed & Karen Lukens with Riffles our Miniature Poodle


2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Standard, Hull #200 / 2017 Silverado High Country 1500 Short Bed 4x4


Past TV - 2012 Mercedes-Benz ML350 4Matic BlueTEC Diesel


Click on our avatar pic above to find the videos on our Oliver Legacy Elite II


 

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Here’s a link to some great flexible Solar pannels.

The flex panels at that link – they are listed as 12 volts, 17.8 volts open and 21.6 volts open. Which is correct and why publish so many different figures? Thanks, John Davies Spokane WA

 

All 3 voltages are correct, the Zamp or your controller converts it to 12vdc for the batteries. So the max voltage that the one pannel sends to the controller is 17.8vdc. The open voltage between the panel's is the 21.6? He said that he would need to read the manual, but that's the basics. He has 400watts on his roof and has pulled 18.5amps so far but in full sun should pull up to 22.

Happy Camping,


null


Reed & Karen Lukens with Riffles our Miniature Poodle


2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Standard, Hull #200 / 2017 Silverado High Country 1500 Short Bed 4x4


Past TV - 2012 Mercedes-Benz ML350 4Matic BlueTEC Diesel


Click on our avatar pic above to find the videos on our Oliver Legacy Elite II


 

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We also are with roguebooks and have decide NOT to purchase an Oliver at this time. We plan on looking at the Airstream because of the negative reports of quality control and poor workmanship. We just believe that thsi is too big of an investment to have so many "kinks". We do appreciate everyone posting their truthful and factual accounts that have enabled us to make an informed and rational decision.

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We also are with roguebooks and have decide NOT to purchase an Oliver at this time. We plan on looking at the Airstream because of the negative reports of quality control and poor workmanship. We just believe that thsi is too big of an investment to have so many “kinks”. We do appreciate everyone posting their truthful and factual accounts that have enabled us to make an informed and rational decision.

 

Well now, we have not, for the record, decided on anything as yet. My wife and I did take an Oliver tour of the factory in late June of 2017 and were extremely impressed. All of our questions were answered satisfactorily. Oliver makes a very good trailer. We must first sell either one of the lots we own in Apalachicola or sell our summer cabin here in northern Michigan. The price of an Oliver I admit is a bit prohibitive, but you get what you pay for. My wife and I have since evolved (we hope) into actually wanting something even smaller than the standard Ollie Elite. If we were ready to buy a trailer today the choice would be between an Armadillo, an Eggcamper, and the Ollie. So as much as I worried over negative comments made here about the Ollie's electrical problems, water levels and drainage issues, the drawers, the spare tire being undersized, as well as not being able to get a composting toilet for the standard Ollie, we still love them and the company. We believe no matter the issue that Oliver would take care of any problem and in good spirit. Brent gave us the tour and he was magnificent. Anita was our sales consultant and she was friendly and helpful as can be.  And the workers there in the factory seemed happy, which means something, especially today.

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roguebooks 2020 Ram Classic 1500 Warlock 4x4 Hemi V-8 2018 Legacy Elite, Hull #309  ALARCOFLINKYLAMIMSMONMOKTNTXsm.jpg

travelmap2022.jpg

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We also are with roguebooks and have decide NOT to purchase an Oliver at this time. We plan on looking at the Airstream because of the negative reports of quality control and poor workmanship. We just believe that thsi is too big of an investment to have so many “kinks”. We do appreciate everyone posting their truthful and factual accounts that have enabled us to make an informed and rational decision.

I admit I'm a "glass half full" guy.  I read this string and get the opposite impression. Everyone who posted, except one who did say she regretted purchasing her trailer, expressed satisfaction with their Oliver. Some worded their issues and opinions in strong terms, but overall are happy Oliver owners. Oliver even posted that they were aware and addressing issues. Not something you'll see over on Airforums.

 

I've been on Airforums for several years and am an Oliver owner because of the many QC issues Airstream owners experience. No trailer will be fault free.  A key question should be how well issues are addressed and fixed.  The few I've had were corrected quickly and completely.

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Texas Hill Country | Elite II #135 | Ram 2500 6.7L

ALAZARCACOFLGAIDILKSKYLAMDMSMOMTNENVNMNYNCNDOHOKSCSDTNTXUTVAWVWYsm.jpgALAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMAMS

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My Oliver is nine plus years old.

Still happy, still get quick answers and support from Oliver if I have an occasional problem. How many manufacturers do that?

I can't discount that new owners have recently had some issues, and that's a huge disappointment for them. I do know that no one, likely, is more disappointed than the Oliver family, and they'll make it right. Growing pains? Probably.

My Oliver is my last trailer. Upgradeable, durable, tough, and clean. At least, that's my nine year experience.

Sherry

 

 

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2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12

Florida and Western North Carolina, or wherever the truck goes....

400 watts solar. Dc compressor fridge. No inverter. 2 x 105 ah agm batteries .  Life is good.

 

 

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I think the tolerance level reduces as the price increases.  Two years ago one could buy a loaded Elite II for $45000... now the same trailer is north of $60000.  That's a huge difference for the same product.  Oliver should be producing Rolls Royce quality for the current price.

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Current 2007 Airstream Classic Limited 31


2015 Oliver Legacy Elite II (Sold)


2016 Ram 2500 HD 6.7i Cummins turbo diesel


 

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