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Ford F-250 crew cab 7.3l SWB 4x4, which tires?


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Putting my ducks in a row for next December.

My Tacoma will not cut it, plus I am getting a great trade-in value.

I could upgrade to a Tundra and be tight with the payload or spend a little more for an F-250 gas and have double payload.

I am choosing the F-250 4x4 7.3l gas instead of a diesel because of cost (initial and ongoing maintenance), plus 445 lbs of torque is plenty don’t need 1,050...

I am pretty set on the options I want, but not sure about tire size for my towing vehicle. What difference does the tire wall height make? 

Standard tires are:   

LT275/65Rx18E  BSW A/S

option   LT275/70Rx18E.  OWL. A/T Tires

I understand de option are All Terrain tires, they come with the FX4 package and have 10,000 less warranty  miles. I would like to have this option, how will they tow compared to the standard tires? Also I am afraid my truck may not fit my garage opening of 83.5 vs the truck height of 81.5 without options.

Any F-250 owners? What is your opinion?

Thanks

Fred

Edited by fredmin
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First - I do not own an F-250 but do have the F-150.  Certainly not the same duck by any means.

However, a fair amount of the answer to your question(s) has to do with how you mainly want to use your truck.  If you are going to do some mild off-roading then you will probably be happier with the slightly wider but more aggressive A/T tires.  And, I'm sure that there are those that will advise you to get even more aggressive.  If you are going to do mainly paved road and the occasional dirt road or forest road then probably the standard tires will be OK.  If you are really into how the tires "look" then the A/T's might give you that "bad", "mean", "big boy" look that some prefer.

Good luck with your decision.

Bill 

2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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Thanks,

 Not really looking for any look in particular, just trying to be practical. I would like to be able to get into more remote locations, thus the 4x4 option.

I called Tire Rack and they suggested the 70 over the 65 wall height as it would provide a less harsher ride. The increase in wheel diameter is minimal.

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If you can provide the make and model of the tires, it would be helpful, then we can look up reviews on Tire Rack and elsewhere.

Since you do want to get “remote”, IMHO get the larger diameter all terrain tires. Bigger sidewalls are better when it gets bumpy, especially if you are inclined to air down (reduce pressure to say 30 psi) for very slow travel. People swap OEM road tires for All Terrains all the time, rarely do they go back in the other direction. It is a TRUCK, after all.😬 In any case, any OEM tire is going to have decent road manners and tire wear, it is usually only when you get into more specialized types, like mud tires, that things get wonky. The All Terrains will provide better traction and rock cut resistance when venturing off pavement, so you will not worry quite so much at the “Pavement Ends” sign. And if your Ollie gets bogged in a soft spot, you will be more likely be able to drag it free.

John Davies

Spokane WA

Edited by John E Davies
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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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I went thorough this when I purchased my f-250 Superduty.  Tire size and axle ratios are pretty well narrowed down by the options you select.  My suggestion is to go to the Ford site and build your truck online.  Start by selecting the option you want and your choices will be narrowed down, if not eliminated.  Tire size is mostly determined by suspension, springs, wheel, cab and bed length.  There was an option on my truck to select the weight rating as well.  Selecting your known or most desired options will narrow down your tire size and axle ratios pretty fast.

 

stev R.

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ARLAPATNTXVAWVsm.jpg

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That is exactly what I did, I built the truck with the options that I wanted and I still got those 2 sizes of tires to choose from. 

I am discarding the FX4 package because it come with a 4.3 axle ratio and I want the 3.55 for fuel economy. It will still be 4x4 .

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I would think either is fine , Ford specked them- chose what you like, the more aggressive tread perhaps - but from the choices shown on the build pics  I couldn't tell. Tire rack should know??? 

 

Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"
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18 hours ago, fredmin said:

I am discarding the FX4 package because it come with a 4.3 axle ratio and I want the 3.55 for fuel economy. It will still be 4x4 .

If you plan to ever pull a big trailer, or care about resale value, get the 4.3 axles!  These SD trucks with their commercial grade engines are built specifically for heavy loads and heavy towing, and the higher ratio you want will greatly reduce the torque at the wheels, by about 20%. That much power loss will be sorely missed when you get high up and face your first 12% grade. These engines lose power at high altitude, your 440 engine ft lbs, at sea level, becomes just 260 ft lbs at 10,000 feet elevation! If you really want better fuel economy buy the turbo diesel.

I really like that 7.3 gas engine, but I think getting the 3.55 axles would be a big mistake, that you would regret making every time the towing conditions got extreme.

IMHO of course.

John Davies

Spokane WA

Edited by John E Davies
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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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With the 10 speed transmissions, axle ratios become less important (lower first gear).

Also look at getting an F350 SRW.  Drives the same, but can carry more stuff (= more resale).

If it were me, I would have a hard time passing up a 2021 F150 eco boost with HDPP if gas made me content.  I don't want to listen to a V8 on mountain passes and since we live next to one, that would be frequent. 

2019 LE2 #529.   Standard Floorplan.

2020 GMC Sierra 2500 Duramax

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

My only comment is relative to (if) you go with a more aggressive tread over a street tire.    I used  Firestone Destination tires on my Dodge 3500 Mega Cab diesel for years and was fairly pleased with them EXCEPT; they picked up gravel like a magnet and then sent them flying down the sides of my truck when you get up to higher speeds.  These would obviously be death to the finish on your Oliver too.  Although it seems somewhat contradictory, when I went to a much more aggressive tread (Nitto Grabber), the openings are much wider and therefore don't pick up the gravel.  They are reasonably quiet too.  Just food for thought.  Gravel sucks!

2018 Elite II, Hull #414 (the very last 2018 produced).  Trailer name "2 HOBOS" .   2006 Dodge 3500 Megacab, 4x4 with 5.9L Cummins diesel.

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5 hours ago, hobo said:

My only comment is relative to (if) you go with a more aggressive tread over a street tire.    I used  Firestone Destination tires on my Dodge 3500 Mega Cab diesel for years and was fairly pleased with them EXCEPT; they picked up gravel like a magnet and then sent them flying down the sides of my truck when you get up to higher speeds.  These would obviously be death to the finish on your Oliver too.  Although it seems somewhat contradictory, when I went to a much more aggressive tread (Nitto Grabber), the openings are much wider and therefore don't pick up the gravel.  They are reasonably quiet too.  Just food for thought.  Gravel sucks!

Too right! Certain tread patterns act like slingshots, but a whole lot depends on the size of the gravel. The typical 3/4” Minus’ crushed rock used for driveways and most unpaved county roads is bad for slinging from most snow and A/T tires. OTH mud tires do not do this, since the gaps are so big the stones cannot get grabbed and released. Plus they grip a whole lot better in turns. For intensive gravel driving, use those mud tires. Or better yet, install proper trailer protection and don’t fret about it.

John Davies

Spokane WA

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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Posted (edited)

IMO, Ford's FX4 packages aren't worth much.  I'd argue that if you want an F250 with offroad capability and tough tires, get the Tremor package.  FWIW, I have the same KO2's from that package on my truck and I've no problems so far towing with them - rain snow, mud, etc.  They really are amazing tires offroad.

Edited by Overland

Snowball • The world's only spherical Ollie

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On 3/3/2021 at 11:44 AM, fredmin said:

Ended up ordering F-350 7.3 gas with 3.73 axle ratio, as there was a very small difference between 3/4 and 1 Ton truck.

I think too, the F-250 version of that truck only offers the 7.3L (Godzilla) engine with the 3.55 (too small IMHO) or the 4.30 rear end which isn't needed for the purposes of towing an Oliver.  You have to move up to the F-350 to get the  3.73 rear end as an option.  Would be really interested in knowing what your "real world" mileage turns out to be with that combination.

Edited by hobo

2018 Elite II, Hull #414 (the very last 2018 produced).  Trailer name "2 HOBOS" .   2006 Dodge 3500 Megacab, 4x4 with 5.9L Cummins diesel.

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The truck was a special order, so it will take at least 8 weeks to get it. Furthermore, my Ollie delivery is scheduled for December 2021. I am planning a trip to the Factory this Summer. I will report my mileage empty and towing after delivery.

I just think that EGR, Particulate filters, def, regens, limping modes have killed the diesels by making them overly complex and very expensive to repair. On top of that, it is a 10k option, since I expect to drive less than 25,000 miles per year, I can’t justify it.

 

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On 3/9/2021 at 9:09 PM, fredmin said:

The truck was a special order, so it will take at least 8 weeks to get it. Furthermore, my Ollie delivery is scheduled for December 2021. I am planning a trip to the Factory this Summer. I will report my mileage empty and towing after delivery.

I just think that EGR, Particulate filters, def, regens, limping modes have killed the diesels by making them overly complex and very expensive to repair. On top of that, it is a 10k option, since I expect to drive less than 25,000 miles per year, I can’t justify it.

 

Actually have a 2006 Dodge 3500 Mega Cab diesel (5.9L) right now.  Last year before they started all the EPA "stuff".   It only has 144K miles on it but I really like the safety features on the newer vehicles.  I might just drive it till the wheels fall off but if I decide to replace, I might very well go with a gasser.  The 7.3L reportedly develops its torque at lower RPMs than most gas engines.  That's why I'm interested in real world MPG data for your setup.  I'll keep an eye out for your findings.

2018 Elite II, Hull #414 (the very last 2018 produced).  Trailer name "2 HOBOS" .   2006 Dodge 3500 Megacab, 4x4 with 5.9L Cummins diesel.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi! Would just like to ask if you have decided what tires to purchase for your F-250? I've been checking 4WheelOnline and other tire shops. Aside from Michelin, have you checked underdog tires such as Cooper A/T's or General Grabber?

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I had some Cooper Discoverer AT's on a different vehicle and thought they performed really well, especially in the mud.  Not nearly as tough of a tire as the KO2s, so probably not as good with rocks, but still a very good tire.  They got a little noisy after 20k or so.

Snowball • The world's only spherical Ollie

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  • 4 weeks later...

Take a strong look at Toyo AT3s.  Some good, long, never ending threads on AT tires on Ih8mud.com, 200 series forum. 

2020 Legacy Elite II Hull 625 - 2013 Lexus LX 570

San Antonio/Boerne - Texas Hill Country

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