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Silly Question about stackable blocks:

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Having received great suggestions about items to procure before our delivery of our Elite II, I just realized that I am perhaps mixing apples and oranges in one arena:

 

Many have suggested the CAMCO stackable blocks but I'm beginning to realize that some folks are talking about blocks to put under the levelers while others (I believe) are talking about blocks to put under the wheels/tires.  To be honest, I was thinking in terms of the levelers.  Do I need to  have blocks of some nature for both?

 

Again, I'm a rookie when it comes to travel trailers so pardon the basic questions.

 

Thanks, Paul (HOBO)


2018 Elite II, Hull #414 (the very last 2018 produced).  Trailer name "2 HOBOS" .   2006 Dodge 3500 Megacab, 4x4 with 5.9L Cummins diesel.

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We made some (2) blocks out of a 6 X 6 X 11".  We use these under the rear stabilizers. The stabilizers are power hogs, so this just saves some juice. If I get into a real uneven site I can lay it sideways and still save some power. I did drill a hole about 1 1/2" from one end and spliced a short line (rope) to give me a handle. We do carry some of those 'Lego' type blocks, because we had some, and have only used a few once. We have a block for under the front stabilizer, just so it doesn't sink into soft soil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We use the legos for the stabilizers, but it's a bit silly.  They're bulky and heavy and I've never once taken them apart to use like you're supposed to.  I'm one of those rebels who uses the jacks like jacks; i.e., like every Ollie owner did prior to two years ago.

 

I really like the Andersen 'buckets', but man, those are some expensive chunks of plastic.

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Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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Hobo -

 

See this post - http://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/levelingsupport-blocks/

 

And do a search for Andersen leveler.  As Overland comments - they are expensive hunks of plastic - but they are easy to work with.  Once you have done this do some online research for other types/brands of levelers that are similar to the Andersens.  Within the past two weeks I remember seeing an ad for these things - possibly at Camping World - and they sure were a bunch less expensive.

 

In using "blocks" (legos or wood or ??) under the Oliver jacks, another benefit is that by reducing the length of the jacks that are deployed, you save a bit of time, save a bit of battery juice (as per Mainiac above) and reduce the amount of torque that the deployed jack must handle.

 

Mine you that the Andersen levelers that I'm referring to are placed under the tires while the blocks are placed under the onboard Oliver jacks.  Of course, "legos" of lengths of 2 x 6 lumber can be used under both the tires and jacks but the putting together of the "legos" for under the tires can be a bit of a guessing game and carrying enough of the correct size 2 x 6 lumber can also be a bit interesting.

 

When I first started RV camping I did the 2 x 6 lumber thing until I learned what I thought I needed.  Now I carry two Andersen levelers, three of the blocks referenced in the post above and two fairly short pieces of 2 x 6 lumber and one stack of ten of the legos.  I can't remember the last time I actually used the legos.  But the blocks and the Andersens get used every trip.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Bill

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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Follow this link to Andersen’s website for information on the attached pictures.

 

https://andersenhitches.com/Catalog/accessories.aspx

 

 

I really like the Andersen ‘buckets’, but man, those are some expensive chunks of plastic. <b>1st photo</b>

 

 

Hobo –

 

See this post – http://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/levelingsupport-blocks/

 

And do a search for Andersen leveler.   <b>2nd photo. </b>

 

Hope this helps.

 

Bill

 

 

The were a couple of Ollie owners at Lake Guntersville this year that really liked the Jack Blocks.

 

I recently picked up 3 of the EZ Blocks <b>3rd picture </b>because like Overland, I thought the Jack Blocks were a little expensive.  So far the EZ Blocks have worked well when placed on a 2” x 12”.  And they can be stacked 2 high just like Jack Blocks if needed.

78B54BD9-4A7E-4312-8539-CC5D51BD0A5C.thumb.png.5b02806d6edb1dcc8da9ea7513f96837.png

4FECA9FF-877F-4541-AF8E-2B6A25D35720.thumb.png.6f39e0193b63c2c61b7e84d59f7eb867.png

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Mike and Krunch   Lutz, FL   LEII #193 “the dog house”

 

 

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Guess we're  old school.  We don't have any fancy plastic blocks or levelers. Though the Anderson rocker type levelers are tempting...

 

We carry a stack of 2x 6 and or 2 x 8 cutoffs from projects. Mostly free, but a 2 x 6 pt board is about  75 cents a foot here... if you have to buy them. Lowe's or depot will even cut them, if you don't have a saw...

 

We run the low side tire up on a board or two, and use 6 or 8 inch chunks stacked under the levelers and tongue jack to spread the weight. To not sink into soft ground.  We also have a ft by ft piece of plywood, if it's really wet, for under the tongue jack, to stack the other blocks on top of it...

<p style="text-align: left;">I like to reduce the throw (length of travel) of all the jacks to conserve power. And, reduce efforts if the jack fails, or the battery dies, and we should have to use the manual crank option. We did have that happen once, years ago...</p>

I also don't like jacking a tire in the air to level, so we will place extra board chunks under a tire in a badly uneven spot, to give the tire more support than just the jack.

 

You'll see a lot of ideas and systems once you start camping. In the meantime,  buy good heavy chocks ( harbor freight is a great source), and figure out what works for you.

 

I like biodegradable/ burnable wood, v plastic. But, my sisters legos are pretty cool...

 

Sherry

 

 

 

 

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2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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B18E30A6-F815-4222-8699-84DC82F4A2B9.thumb.jpeg.715dee3a156b5da59abb7c077b8603da.jpeg

I made three of these blocks out of scrap 2X6 pressure treated lumber, screwed them together and put some exterior stain and rope handles. I have one for each jack. The little yellow pad is just to provide a flat surface and keeps them a bit drier during wet weather. Next time I’ll make them a bit taller. We use the big lego blocks under the wheels to level. This is our current site and we were just off level a bit so I drove up on one lego and then just had to tweak with the jacks. When up on legos I use a scissor brace between the wheels and regular chocks on the other side. Mike

 

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Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram Rebel 4X4 5.7L Hemi

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Lots of good responses here.  I have nothing to add about which might be abetter choice. I do caution, however,  that, according to Oliver, the Jacks should not be used as levelers, but only as stabilizers.  They recommend using any of those products under your wheel to level the unit.


Mike and Elizabeth Smith


Snow Lake Shores, MS


2016 Ford F150 3.5 EB, max tow (20,900  miles pulling Ollie since Sept 2016)


 


 

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Paul:

 

Welcome to our Forum!

 

For me, space, functionality, cost, and durability are considerations.  To do this, I recommend the following:

Get a milk crate to store all my leveling blocks. (Space)

Cut two pieces of scrap plywood (Recommend 3/4" thick) that will easily fit into the milk crate.  I use this only in really muddy sites where the below will sink into the mud.  For soft mud sites, place the plywood under the low side rear jack and the tongue.

2" X 6" scrap cut offs that easily fit flat into the milk crate side by side.

Fill the crate to the top with the 2X6's and bungee the milk crate to the aluminum tongue tow box with my 2.5 gallon gas can for the Honda EU2200i.

Lessons Learned:

 

A.  When I started my Milk Crate approach, I had a couple of 2" X 12", and tried 2" X 10" cut-offs.  I used them under the tongue jack and really liked them.  But I quickly learned that the tongue weight in soft mud would break them long wise.  Hence the plywood.  For muddy locations, I placed the plywood on the ground, and then place two 2X6's side by side, then I stack as needed single 2X6's at 90 degrees to the base layer.  This plan has resulted in a more even load on the front plywood base and they have not failed.

 

B.  My "Easily Fit" definition changed after the Milk Crate cube of wood got very wet and expanded to the point that I had trouble getting the wood out of the crate.  My second try allowed for 1/2" clearance for the boards and plywood.

 

C.  As mentioned by others, I also support using all my dunage to reduce jacking time, energy use and wear.  But a more important reason is prevention of jack damage.  You would not believe the number of owners that have forgot to raise a jack before driving off and destroying the jack.  Having dunage under all three jacks gives you a chance of not having  to replace the extended bent jack.

 

Finally be sure to have an arrival and departure check list.  PM me if you would like a copy of the one that I have put together that includes the majority of the elements others have identified, and some of my own a well.

 

Good luck!

 

Geronimo John

 

 

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Tug:  2019 F-150 SuperCrew Lariat, 3.5L EcoBoost, Max Trailer Tow, FX-4, 4X4, Rear Locker

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B18E30A6-F815-4222-8699-84DC82F4A2B9.jpeg

 

When up on legos I use a scissor brace between the wheels and regular chocks on the other side. Mike

 

Mike,

 

is that the Camco brace between the wheels?  Camco has two sizes.  Which size fits the Ollie II?

 

Thanks,

 

Frank


2019 Elite II - Hull #461


Tow Vehicle: 2019 Nissan Armada. 

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Frank, yes, it’s a Camco. I assume it’s the smaller size if there are two sizes. It fits nicely. It’s the one you see frequently in Walmart.

 

I mounted an aluminum box on the tongue to store my chocks, blocks, leather gloves, flashlight, level and an old towel in. It was about $100 on Amazon and has held up well. Mike

 

7759AE6D-1B2B-496A-B594-3728D51F4BAC.thumb.jpeg.8519647259eac7b084c3111ebf707536.jpeg

 

 

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Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram Rebel 4X4 5.7L Hemi

ALAZARCACOFLGAIDILKSKYLAMDMSMOMTNENVNMNYNCNDOHOKSCSDTNTXUTVAWVWYsm.jpg

 

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Thanks Mike.  A very nice setup.  I’m thinking about doing a similar tongue box setup when I get my Ollie II.    And can you tell me what the gap is between the treads of the two tandem tires on an Ollie?  That’ll help me to make sure I order the right Camco wheel stabilizer.  Amazon has two sizes as options. The small size says it’s for a tire gap of  1.5” to 3.5” between the treads of the tandem tires, and the large size is for 3.5” to 5.5”.  The small size looks like it might be about right (see photo).

 

Thanks,

 

Frank

4020DD54-452B-4521-8FF0-E3BCFEC52DA7.thumb.png.4af28afde39b6a0a0196acfe12fe277a.png


2019 Elite II - Hull #461


Tow Vehicle: 2019 Nissan Armada. 

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Here’s a pic as we sit out this morning drinking coffee. It looks like it should be the larger one. I just measured the other side and it’s almost 5” between tires as they sit on the ground. This side on legos looks to be about 4.5”.

 

 

6473F5A2-36C6-4EAA-9E01-1C1E3EA8F1EF.thumb.jpeg.2bbfcc8c32b7ff41b7c8cd3d53742369.jpeg

 

 

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Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram Rebel 4X4 5.7L Hemi

ALAZARCACOFLGAIDILKSKYLAMDMSMOMTNENVNMNYNCNDOHOKSCSDTNTXUTVAWVWYsm.jpg

 

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Thanks Mike!  That’s very helpful.

 

Frank


2019 Elite II - Hull #461


Tow Vehicle: 2019 Nissan Armada. 

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I’m a rookie when it comes to travel trailers so pardon the basic questions.

 

We were all rookies at some time--I was less than two years ago. I was reluctant at first to ask basic questions here but found that folks were patient and willing to offer great advice, which I still ask for . . .

 

As for leveling, we've found that Andersens work the best. (I will, however, never buy from this company again. The owner vandalized a natural arch in Utah and offered, in my opinion, an insincere public-relations apology. There are, it seems, good Andersen-type levelers out there.) Rolling up on these levelers is sure easier than working to build those pyramid-shaped forms with the "lego" pieces, as we did before getting the Andersens.

 

We use the "lego" type blocks under the three jacks. As reported by others above, they reduce how much you need to extend the jacks, keep the ends from sinking into soft ground, and provide peace of mind that you won't be damaging the jacks should you forget to retract them before pulling your trailer.  We use Tri-Lynx levelers and caps to build these blocks.

 

After reading Mike's post and viewing his photo, I just put this into my Amazon shopping cart: Camco Yellow RV Wheel Stop-Stabilizes -Large (44622). These, in addition to our Camco Wheel Chocks, will provide extra stability and peace of mind that we won't be rolling off off the Tri-Lynx blocks or Andersens.

 

Note: While I admire those who have built their own blocks to put under the stabilizers, I like that the Tri-Lynx are lighter weight than wood. Like Geronimo John, we store our blocks (Tri-Lynx) in a milk crate along with the chocks. The Andersens are pretty heavy but fit well in the "curve" of the basement compartment.

 

Happy leveling and stabilizing.

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Onward through the Fog!


EarthPicks of Cochise County


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Seeing the mention of storing chocks, etc., does a “standard” milk crate fit in the Ollie II lower storage area? (In terms of height).


2019 Elite II - Hull #461


Tow Vehicle: 2019 Nissan Armada. 

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Seeing the mention of storing chocks, etc., does a “standard” milk crate fit in the Ollie II lower storage area? (In terms of height).

 

Yes. It's what we use. Quite convenient for storing chocks,  etc. and will rest on the Ollie's bumper while you dig into the rest of the basement for hoses, power cords, etc.

 

 

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Onward through the Fog!


EarthPicks of Cochise County


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They sure do.  If you have to buy some, Amazon has a 3 pack of the long ones that fit great.

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Mike and Krunch   Lutz, FL   LEII #193 “the dog house”

 

 

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