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How To Install a Rear Cargo Carrier on an Oliver Legacy Elite II


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Summary
I have installed a rear mounted cargo carrier, with lights, to our 2022 Oliver Legacy Elite II (LEII) travel trailer.  We recently completed a two week, ~2000 mile trip, using the cargo carrier, which performed flawlessly.  Below are photos of the installed cargo carrier, which are followed by a detailed description of its installation.  
 
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Storage Constraints
Prior to ordering our Oliver Legacy Elite II (LEII) travel trailer I knew we would need additional storage space on the trailer.  We are using a 2014 BMW X5 35d (diesel) as our tow vehicle, rather than a pickup truck.  Thus, we could not plan to use the pickup bed for supplemental storage.  We also needed to stay within the tow vehicle's cargo capacity of 1100 lbs and maximum tongue weight of 600 lbs..  Expecting a tongue weight of approximately 500 lbs. plus two occupants at approximately 300 lbs, we could only accommodate a maximum of 300 lbs. of other cargo.  The available payload will be partially used by our camera gear, which must be protected from exposure to moisture.  A tongue mounted cargo carrier was not viable, given the tongue weight limit for the tow vehicle.
 
Storage Requirements
I anticipated needing additional storage space for the following items:
  • Champion Dual Fuel Generator- 2500 watt (~45 lbs.) (too large for basement storage)
  • Napoleon TravelQ™ 285 Portable Propane Gas Grill and hose (~35 lbs.) (too large for basement storage)
  • Anderson Ultimate Leveling kit (~25 lbs)
  • Harbor Freight rubber chocks (4) (~20 lbs.)
  • Camco Stabilizer Jack Supports (3) (~10 lbs.)
  • Miscellaneous accessories
All of these items can tolerate some exposure to moisture, which is likely when stored in any external cargo carrier.  A closed and reasonably secure cargo carrier was needed.
 
Searching the owners' forum, I found examples of rear cargo carriers/bike racks and found several examples, including:
  • Oliver's original bike rack design using twin receivers and extending approximately 3 feet beyond the rear bumper;
  • Various rear mounted metal cargo boxes, including custom designs;
  • Rear mounting of an Oliver tongue cargo box by John E. Davies.
I also looked extensively at aluminum cargo boxes from various manufacturers, trying to find options which could accommodate the cargo items listed above.
 
I already owned a cargo carrier which we had used on the BMW X5 tow vehicle.  This carrier has a heavy steel swing-away frame which mounts to a standard 2" receiver.  Mounted on the steel frame are a polypropylene tray and an enclosed container with 13.5 cubic foot capacity.  The tray and enclosed container interlock.  This cargo carrier also is equipped with fully functional lights (running, brake, turn, flasher).
 
 
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Interlocking pins on the enclosed container mate with the tray.  Locking latches secure the container to the tray.
 
Solution Approach
I decided to re-use the polypropylene tray and enclosed cargo container, but not the heavy steel frame.  Instead, I would use a design similar to the original Oliver bike rack.  I ordered the current optional Oliver bike rack when we placed our LEII order, planning to utilize some, but not all, of its components.
 
The current Oliver rear hitch (photo below) utilizes twin receivers that are 11" long, constructed to receive 2" x 2" X 0.25" (wall thickness) T6061 aluminum square tube support arms, which are 17 inches long.  The receivers are each mounted to the LEII frame by two long 0.5" diameter stainless steel bolts and nuts.  The other components of the rack are a 2" x 5" x 0.25" T6061 aluminum cross-member, 51-1/8" long (with end caps), and a 1-1/4" receiver for connecting a bike rack.  I planned to use the twin receivers, and the cross-member, but not the support arms, nor the 1-1/4" receiver.
 
Instead, I would replace the 17" long original support arms with longer equivalents, whose length was to be determined.  I would utilize the original 2" x 5" x 0.25" T6061 aluminum cross-member and add another cross member, this one 2" x 2" x 0.25" T6061 aluminum, also 51-1/8" inches long with end caps.  The cross members would be bolted to the support arms, in the same manner as on the Oliver rear hitch.  The tray and enclosed container from my existing cargo carrier would be mounted to the cross-members.
 
Note the clevis pins circled in the photo below, there are two 0.50" diameter horizontal clevis pins securing the support arms in their receivers.  Each clevis pin has a washer on either side of the receiver.  Removing the clevis pins permits the support arms to be pulled to the rear, enabling removal of the spare tire cover and spare tire without dismount the support arms.
 
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Solution Model
A critical dimension to be determined was the length of the  2" x 2" x 0.25" support arms.  The new support arms need to be long enough to:
  • Support the polypropylene tray and enclosed cargo box and attach using the molded mounting holes in the tray;
  • Allow the lid of the enclosed cargo box to open without striking the spare tire cover;
  • Permit removal of the spare tire cover and spare tire without removing the cargo carrier and support frame;
  • Permit access to waste water hoses stored behind the bumper;
  • Minimize the additional length of the cargo carrier and support frame to the LEII's length.
I fabricated 2" x 2" wooden support arms, approximately 40" long.  Using woodworking equipment, I cut slots into one end of each support arm to fit around the bolts holding the twin receivers to the frame.  I also drilled horizontal holes for the clevis pins which retain the support arms in the receivers.
 
Positioning the Cargo Carrier on the Cross-members
The wooden support arms were inserted into the twin receivers and secured with the clevis pins.   Then the 2" x 5" x 51.125" T6061 cross-member was placed across the support arms near the bumper. The additional 2" x 2" x 51.125" wooden cross-member, was also placed across the support arms, but further from the bumper.  Clamps were used to hold the cross-members in place on the support arms.
 
The polypropylene tray and enclosed container, latched together, were positioned on the cross-members, centering both to the trailer's width.  I opened the lid of the enclosed container and adjusted the spacing (fore and aft) between the lid and the spare tire cover to ensure they did not contact each other.
 
Once I had located the joined tray and enclosed container in what appeared to be a desirable position, I adjusted the positions of the cross-members fore and aft to establish alignment with the mounting holes in the tray.  The 2" x 5" cross-member engages two mounting holes on each side of the tray.  The 2" x 2" cross- member engages only one mounting hole on each side of the base of the tray.  Six 5/16" carriage bolts will fasten the tray to the cross-members.  Only four carriage bolts attached the tray to its original steel support frame.
 
I used a mason's string stretched across the width of the tray with weights on either end to aid in aligning the mounting holes in the tray with the positions of the cross-members.  I also used carpenter's squares to verify the cross-members were perpendicular to the support arms.  Another check of squareness was made by measuring the distance from the trailer bumper to the cross-members.  
 
Once I was satisfied with the position of the tray and enclosed container on the support structure, I marked the locations for the holes to be drilled for the six mounting bolts to secure the tray to the cross-members.  The tray overhangs the rear cross-member at the rear.
 
With the cargo carrier tray and enclosed container in place on the clamped cross-members, I wanted to determine if the spare tire cover could be removed without removing the entire cargo carrier and support assembly.  I found I could remove the clevis pins and pull the support arms aft approximately 7 inches out of the twin receivers and enable removal of the spare tire cover.
 
With the tray and enclosed container positioned on the cross-members, I could now determine the required length of the support arms, which is 33.75 inches.  The location of the rear cross-member determines the length of the support arms.
 
After locating the mounting position of the tray and enclosed container I marked all key positions and hole locations on the wooden support arms and wooden rear cross-member.  I cut the wooden support arms to the desired final length.
 
Material Sourcing and Machining
 
The required T6061 aluminum components required are:
  • 2" x 2" x 0.25" x 33.75", square tube, quantity 2 (support arms), cost= $110.18
  • 2" x 2" x 0.25" x 51.125", square tube, quantity 1 (cross-member), cost= to $99.08
  • 2" x 12" x 0.125", flat bar, quantity 1 (to be cut into 2" squares for end caps on the support arms and rear cross-member), cost= $6.86
  • Sales tax= $17.83
  • No shipping charge.  I picked up the materials at the local Metal Supermarkets warehouse
  • Total cost= a $233.95
 
The above T6061 aluminum components, cut to specified length, were obtained from:
Metal Supermarkets Dallas 
1216 Dolton Dr, Suite 101
Dallas, TX 75207
Phone: 972-445-2008
Fax: 972-579-3346
 
Stainless steel bolts and nyloc nuts were obtained from:
Crouch Sales, Inc.
2636 Irving Blvd
Dallas TX 75207
‭(214) 637-6051‬
Additional hardware required:
  • 5" x 0.50" bolts, quantity 2 (to fasten 2" x 2" x 51.125" cross-member to support arms
  • 0.50" nyloc nuts, quantity 2
  • 0.50" x 1.00" flat washers, quantity 4
  • 5/16" x 5" carriage bolts, quantity 6
  • 5/16" flat washers, quantity 6
  • 5/16" nuts, quantity 12 (double jam nuts used with carriage bolts, instead of nyloc nuts)
  • Cost= approximately $20.00
 
I was referred by Metal Supermarkets to a local machine shop:
Air & Earth, Gear & Machine Works
2325 Hinton Dr.
Irving TX 75061
‭(972) 438-2277‬
When I received the materials I took them and my wooden mockups of the support arms and cross-member to Air & Earth.  I also took one of the original support arms.  I discussed the machining needed: to cut the slots in one end of the support arms and to drill the needed 0.50 diameter holes for the clevis pins and mounting bolts.  I also asked them to cut the 2" x 0.125" flat bar into 2" x 2" squares.  I did not ask them to drill the smaller holes for mounting the cargo tray to the cross-members.  I was quoted $220 and turnaround of the job within a week.  They did an excellent job within the promised timeframe.
 
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Finishing and Assembly of the Support Structure
After Air & Earth completed the requested machining,  I performed the following finishing steps, which included:
  • Rounding the edges of the 2" x 2" square tubing on the slotted end to be inserted into the receivers.  I used a 3" wide belt sander with 100 grit sanding belts to round the corners of approximately 12" of the tube which would be inserted into the receivers .  The original Oliver support arms also had the corners rounded to more easily slide within the receivers.  Several trial fittings were required to verify smooth insertion and removal to/from the receivers.
  • image.thumb.jpeg.8206bdf6f117823e75110d6f7fc700fb.jpeg
  • The support arms and the rear cross-member were sanded with an orbital sander using 200 grit disks.  This sanding removed markings on the tubes and made the surface textured, similar to the Oliver rear hitch components.
  • The support arms were inserted into their receivers and fastened with the clevis pins.
  • The cross members were aligned with the mounting holes on the support arms and bolted into place.
  • The cargo tray was positioned on the 2" x 5" cross-member at the previously determined mounting position and holes drilled to mount the cargo tray.  Holes were then drilled in the 2" x 2" rear cross-member.  Carriage bolts, flat washers and double jamb nuts were used to secure the cargo tray to the cross-members.
  • Once all test fittings of the support assembly were completed, lithium grease was applied to the ends of the support arms which are inserted into the receivers.
  • 2" x 2" x 0.125" caps were attached to the open ends of the support arms and the rear cross-member, similar to the end caps used by Oliver.  These were attached to the square tubing using JB Weld epoxy.
 
Cargo Carrier Lighting
The cargo carrier partially blocks visibility to the taillights of the trailer, which is most noticeable when viewed from close behind the trailer.  At a distance the taillights are largely visible.
 
The cargo tray is fitted with two LED light fixtures and a wiring harness with a 4-pin flat connector.  A corresponding 4-pin flat connector was installed on the LEII to integrate the lighting on the cargo carrier with the trailer lighting.  Details of the installation of the 4-pin connector in the trailer are covered in a separate article.  The lights on the cargo carrier ensure 
the trailer is quite visible from behind.
 
A license plate mount was added to the cargo carrier tray, since the license plate mount on the spare tire cover is blocked by the cargo carrier.  Lighting for the license plate mount is provided by adding a Y connector to the license plate light cable under the spare tire cover and adding an extension cable routed to the cargo tray mounted license plate mount.
 
I also added reflective tape to the support frame members.  I used the following reflective tape:
 
Conclusion
This addition to our trailer provides significant benefits, with no significant disadvantages.  It does add approximately two feet to the length of the trailer.  Besides the additional storage space, the cargo carrier and its load slightly reduces the tongue weight.  I measured the tongue weight, using a Sherline scale, at 450 lbs., with no water onboard.  Tongue weight seems sufficient, as no swaying or other handling issues have been observed.
 
This project had a successful outcome due largely to the information I was able to glean from the Oliver Owners Forum.  I hope this information is useful to others on the forum.  Comments and suggestions welcome.
 
Regards, Don
 
 

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North Texas | 2022 LEII, Hull #990, delivered 2/17/22 | 2014 BMW X5 35d

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@dhaig  Your cargo carrier and mounting solution looks very robust, well planned and based on your 2000 mile test run, very functional.  Thank you for the detailed write up which even I could follow and other OTTO’s can use to their advantage and solve their own cargo carrying limitations.

Mossey

 

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Mike and Krunch   Lutz, FL   LEII #193 “the dog house”

 

 

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Bravo, very nice, and what a great description. I have a couple of comments, since I can’t seem to leave the back end of “Mouse” alone.

Using wood for mocking up is a neat idea. Did you write the actual dimensions on the pieces before dropping them off at the machine shop? The shop needs quite precise measurements. Relying on your holes in wood might not be precise enough.

Drain holes? This can be a super wet part of the trailer, each part needs two openings, at a minimum, for water to escape. (I leave my parts wide open and simply blast them with water when washing the trailer.) A little moisture will naturally escape from the bolt holes, even with the hardware in place, but those will eventually plug up with debris and corrosion. A hole at each end of each cross beam allows water to egress regardless of the angle of the trailer. And do not forget to add some to the Ollie bumper, the factory does not drill any! Be prepared for water to flow out onto your drill, so drop the bumper down first.

I really like your annotated images. That is very easy to do with an iMac or iPhone, I don’t have a clue how you would do it with a PC or SOB phone. What did you use?

Thanks for posting such an informative thread. I think members should be aware of how much work is involved in doing an article like this.

John Davies

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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Don - 

Nicely done with a great description.

Thanks for posting it!

Bill

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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1 hour ago, John E Davies said:

Bravo, very nice, and what a great description. I have a couple of comments, since I can’t seem to leave the back end of “Mouse” alone.

Using wood for mocking up is a neat idea. Did you write the actual dimensions on the pieces before dropping them off at the machine shop? The shop needs quite precise measurements. Relying on your holes in wood might not be precise enough.

Drain holes? This can be a super wet part of the trailer, each part needs two openings, at a minimum, for water to escape. (I leave my parts wide open and simply blast them with water when washing the trailer.) A little moisture will naturally escape from the bolt holes, even with the hardware in place, but those will eventually plug up with debris and corrosion. A hole at each end of each cross beam allows water to egress regardless of the angle of the trailer. And do not forget to add some to the Ollie bumper, the factory does not drill any! Be prepared for water to flow out onto your drill, so drop the bumper down first.

I really like your annotated images. That is very easy to do with an iMac or iPhone, I don’t have a clue how you would do it with a PC or SOB phone. What did you use?

Thanks for posting such an informative thread. I think members should be aware of how much work is involved in doing an article like this.

John Davies

Spokane WA

@John E Davies, Thanks, John, for kind words.  Thanks also for reviewing and commenting on my design approach.  In answer to your questions:

  • Yes, I did write the dimensions on the wooden mockup pieces.  As I mentioned in my writeup, I also took one of the original support arms to the machine shop and explained the most critical dimensions are for the horizontal holes through which the clevis pins pass to secure the arms to the receivers and the vertical slot.  I had initially assumed I would need to provide dimensional drawings to the machine shop.  However, when I asked if they needed drawings, they said no, the dimensions on the wooden mockups and having the original support arm were sufficient.
  • Thanks for reminding me to drill drain holes!  I had planned to do so, largely from reading some of your write-ups.  I agree with the need for them.  This is relatively easy to do with the support structure in place.
  • I composed the article initially using the Safari browser interface for Gmail on my MacBook Pro M1 laptop (MBP).  I used Gmail because I am very familiar with its behavior, particularly the autosave function.  I had to break the article into two draft emails when I reached the 25 MB limit of Gmail, after which it loads images to Google Drive.  I wanted the images kept in place in the text flow.
    • Once I completed composition and proofreading I copied the contents of both draft emails into a new topic page in the owners forum.  Not having previously composed a long article directly in the new topic page, I was concerned about possible loss of content before completion.
    • All of the photos were taken with my iPhone 13 Pro Max, which automatically stores the images in Apple's Photos/iCloud.  I created a smart collection in the Photos using keywords, to make it easier to see all of the related photos together.  I selected photos for inclusion in the article and exported them as JPEGs to the Downloads folder on my MBP.
    • I used Apple's Preview app on my MBP to do some minor cropping of the photos and used the annotation features to add arrows, circles and text.  I got lazy and used a grey filled rectangle to mask the license plate in a few photos, rather than take the photos into Photoshop for a more elegant edit.  The Preview app is surprisingly robust.  I do not know of any comparable utility in the Windows or Android worlds.  I have previously used Window PCs extensively, but the Android world is foreign to me. 
    • I suspect you use a similar annotation process, having seen many of your annotated photos.
  • Finally, yes, posting informative articles is time consuming.  I spent most of the day yesterday drafting and editing.  I also found I needed to take a few more photos yesterday, in addition to those taken during work on the project.  I also had to confirm some measurements and materials details.  I have benefitted significantly from reading your well crafted articles and those of many other contributors to the forum.  I feel an obligation to contribute.

Regards, Don

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North Texas | 2022 LEII, Hull #990, delivered 2/17/22 | 2014 BMW X5 35d

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On 6/4/2022 at 7:14 AM, John E Davies said:

Bravo, very nice, and what a great description. I have a couple of comments, since I can’t seem to leave the back end of “Mouse” alone.

Using wood for mocking up is a neat idea. Did you write the actual dimensions on the pieces before dropping them off at the machine shop? The shop needs quite precise measurements. Relying on your holes in wood might not be precise enough.

Drain holes? This can be a super wet part of the trailer, each part needs two openings, at a minimum, for water to escape. (I leave my parts wide open and simply blast them with water when washing the trailer.) A little moisture will naturally escape from the bolt holes, even with the hardware in place, but those will eventually plug up with debris and corrosion. A hole at each end of each cross beam allows water to egress regardless of the angle of the trailer. And do not forget to add some to the Ollie bumper, the factory does not drill any! Be prepared for water to flow out onto your drill, so drop the bumper down first.

I really like your annotated images. That is very easy to do with an iMac or iPhone, I don’t have a clue how you would do it with a PC or SOB phone. What did you use?

Thanks for posting such an informative thread. I think members should be aware of how much work is involved in doing an article like this.

John Davies

Spokane WA

Re John's comment to drill drain holes in the bumper, do you have a thread on that recommendation?

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Albert & Terri

Elite II Hull #1125 Standard Floorplan / Tow Vehicle: 2017 Ford F250

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What a great write-up!  Thanks for sharing this - we've been contemplating a rear carrier since we picked up Hull 953 and I sure do like how robust this is.

mb

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MaryBeth
Boulder, CO

2022 Elite II #953
TV: 2021 Ford Expedition Max Platinum, Max Tow Package

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Don,

I don’t have a rear cargo carrier, but if I were to consider one, your design looks great.
Well done sir!

-David

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2020 OLEII - Hull #634   TV -2021 F 350 6.7 liter Diesel Lariat Ultimate “Tremor”

 

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On 6/19/2022 at 1:13 AM, albert60 said:

Re John's comment to drill drain holes in the bumper, do you have a thread on that recommendation?

Unfortunately, no, there is not, to my knowledge, a thread on drain/weep holes.  @John E Davies may be able to offer more details, especially given his experience dealing with structural elements on aircraft.

My understanding is that any buildup of water within a structural element is a a potential source for failure of the structural element in the event the water freezes.  Such failure is most likely to occur when the trailer is subjected to sustained sub-freezing weather.  For the rear bumper and the extended support arms under my cargo carrier, I plan to drill ¼” weep holes to allow any trapped moisture to escape.

Since I live in Dallas, TX,I believe the prospect of freeze damage to be relatively low.  However, in February, 2021, we experienced the “Texas deep freeze”, with temperatures at or below 0 degrees Fahrenheit for a week.  The cost or prevention is low.  I will drill the weep holes, but probably not until mid-September, when the daily high temperatures are no longer near 100 deg. F.  I see no downside to having the weep holes to allow the moisture to escape.

 

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North Texas | 2022 LEII, Hull #990, delivered 2/17/22 | 2014 BMW X5 35d

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Thanks for the reply, it looks like I'll be drilling some weep holes in my bumper too.

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Albert & Terri

Elite II Hull #1125 Standard Floorplan / Tow Vehicle: 2017 Ford F250

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On 6/18/2022 at 10:13 PM, albert60 said:

Re John's comment to drill drain holes in the bumper, do you have a thread on that recommendation?

Sorry, I missed this, there isn't a thread about it, as far as I know. It is just common sense that any "dead end" part that can potentially collect water, should have at least a couple of weep holes underneath to allow it to escape, one at each end of the bumper, for example. For the bike rack mount, the big cross beam has through holes in it, to attach the square receiver, and just like for the bumper, Oliver added pretty decorative end caps to the beam. The big mount holes will allow a little moisture to trickle out around the washers and nuts, but eventually those gaps will fill with dirt and corrosion. Did they add dedicated drain holes in the bottom? I dunno. Freezing is a concern, as is long term corrosion.

If you see standing water on any part of your Ollie, you should take steps to stop it. Both of the entry steps, for example, hold water on top when stowed; you can drill some 1/8" holes in the low spots to eliminate that. The first Ollie awning support bracket was a simple L shape, that was fine though maybe prone to developing cracks at the bend. The first redesign of the bracket had a welded triangular gusset. It would stop any cracks but trapped water, and it is up on the roof where an owner couldn't see it. A second redesign had the triangle tip cut off, providing a channel for the water to go away on its own. I don't know if that part has further changed 😉 It is a sign that Oliver continually updates and refines stuff, based on owner experiences and feedback.

It would be really nice if there were a webpage dedicated to keeping track of the evolutionary changes to various parts, to educate and to alert owners that they might have a problematic part. The Ollie Service Department knows all this, and can advise, but the information isn't available to owners, as far as I know...

John Davies

Spokane WA

 

 

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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Very good job on the carrier actually more than good it’s excellent.  Now you mentioned that you had a separate article on the wiring of the 4 pin wire I’m not able to find it. Your help would be greatly appreciated. 

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12 hours ago, John E Davies said:

Sorry, I missed this, there isn't a thread about it, as far as I know. It is just common sense that any "dead end" part that can potentially collect water, should have at least a couple of weep holes underneath to allow it to escape, one at each end of the bumper, for example. For the bike rack mount, the big cross beam has through holes in it, to attach the square receiver, and just like for the bumper, Oliver added pretty decorative end caps to the beam. The big mount holes will allow a little moisture to trickle out around the washers and nuts, but eventually those gaps will fill with dirt and corrosion. Did they add dedicated drain holes in the bottom? I dunno. Freezing is a concern, as is long term corrosion.

If you see standing water on any part of your Ollie, you should take steps to stop it. Both of the entry steps, for example, hold water on top when stowed; you can drill some 1/8" holes in the low spots to eliminate that. The first Ollie awning support bracket was a simple L shape, that was fine though maybe prone to developing cracks at the bend. The first redesign of the bracket had a welded triangular gusset. It would stop any cracks but trapped water, and it is up on the roof where an owner couldn't see it. A second redesign had the triangle tip cut off, providing a channel for the water to go away on its own. I don't know if that part has further changed 😉 It is a sign that Oliver continually updates and refines stuff, based on owner experiences and feedback.

It would be really nice if there were a webpage dedicated to keeping track of the evolutionary changes to various parts, to educate and to alert owners that they might have a problematic part. The Ollie Service Department knows all this, and can advise, but the information isn't available to owners, as far as I know...

John Davies

Spokane WA

 

 

Picked up our E2 on June 3, looked at the awning brackets and they still have cut off the point of the triangle in the bracket so water can pass through. I was a little disappointed that the hole was so small, about 1/4 inch, but better than nothing I suppose. It's a place I plan on monitoring a few times a year especially when there's any risk of freezing. Thanks for the input John.

 

albert

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Albert & Terri

Elite II Hull #1125 Standard Floorplan / Tow Vehicle: 2017 Ford F250

COCTDEILINKSMDMAMONJNMNYOHPARITNVAWVsm.j

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