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francesm

Tow vehicle advice asked for

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I have a question for you gentlemen out there. Let's know that I am going to view used tow vehicles, cars and trucks... Not being savvy in veh. engines and such, especially diesel, how do I determine a good vehicle from a lemon? Who can I consult to examine what I find to determine if it is as advertised? I'm not sure if I should buy diesel or gas yet, so either is a possibility. Outside the just sold Toyota 89 4 cyl MH, I've never bought anything but new vehicles: My 300ZX lasted & looked like new for 18 years, a turbo yet. I never had one engine repair in all that time. So, I don't want to get stuck with a lemon because I know nothing about used engines. I need some advice.. like who should I get to inspect whatever USED vehicle I've found.. whether gas or diesel.. I live in the Knoxville area of TN. Women have been notoriously gypped by sellers who know that we are not experts in engines and performance. Any comments, or advice?

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Hi Frances,

 

OK, buckle up. Here we go with my $0.02 on the subject!

 

At a very minimum if you are buying a used car you need to pull the CarFax report on that vehicle - see http://www.CarFax.com. You'll need the VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) of the car/truck in order to do this. You can buy just single car reports, but if you plan to do much shopping you can get a 30 day subscription to the service that allows for any number of reports to be generated. Understand that these reports aren't perfect, but they will give you a good idea of how many owners the car has had and for how long, what the real mileage is, and a reasonably good idea of whether or not it's been in a wreck, salvaged, etc. Numerous owners, major accidents, salvage activity, a series of dealer swaps, and any sort of mileage discrepancies are things that I would consider to be red flags about any given vehicle. It's possible that the report somehow doesn't include accident repairs (for example if the owner made the repairs themselves) so always have a qualified mechanic check the vehicle for any signs of body or frame work even if the CarFax looks clean.

 

It's just my opinion but clean, low mileage, one owner vehicles bought from a dealer that specializes in that brand are *probably* your best bet. The optimum would be a local trade not bought via some form of auction. If you can actually talk to the prior owner so much the better!

 

Obviously just about any kind of warranty, especially CPO (Certified Pre Owned), included with the purchase is a good thing. Be wary of expensive aftermarket warranties that may or may not be a good value, though ...

 

Find a good local mechanic, whether the dealer for that brand or an independent, and pay for a pre-purchase inspection (PPI). This won't be terribly expensive but is very worthwhile if you're serious about a vehicle. This should NOT be a mechanic employed by the selling dealership! This PPI should include a compression test on the engine given that you'll be towing (and the former owner of the vehicle may well have towed as well). If you're really paranoid you can pay for an engine oil analysis to see if there are signs of internal wear or failure.

 

I hate to say it, but consider buying an on-line subscription to Consumer Reports and check out their vehicle reviews and reliability rankings. I generally don't see eye-to-eye with these folks but if you're new to this game the information presented may be helpful. They'll tell you straight up if there are certain brands/models/years that should send you running in the other direction ...

 

Check out the towing guides published for that model and year (usually available on-line from the manufacturer but also published by Trailer Life on an annual basis) to make sure that it has sufficient hitch weight capability and towing weight capability. I know that it sounds like vegetable soup but you need to make sure that you're within limits for both the GCWR and GVWR for the tow vehicle. Gross Combined Weight Rating is basically the maximum weight allowed for the loaded truck plus the loaded trailer ready to roll down the road. Gross Vehicle Weight Rating is basically the maximum allowed weight for the loaded truck (truck + occupants + stuff + hitch weight from trailer). These ratings are a function of engine power, cooling capacity, transmission, tires, brakes, frame, etc. and are assigned by the manufacturer (and their lawyers). These ratings are not easily changed once a vehicle leaves the factory. The Oliver is relatively lightweight, so I doubt that you'll see any issues here for a tow vehicle of any substance.

 

When all else fails, trust your eyes and your nose ... I'd rather have a vehicle with some signs of good honest use vs. one that's been dolled up by the seller in order to hide a problem of some sort. Steam-cleaned engine bays, for example, are one sign of recent major engine work. Overly perfumed interiors might be hiding a water issue or a smoking PO (prior owner). Fresh paint could signal a major accident. And so on ...

 

Happy Hunting!

 

Stuart

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Tow Vehicle Advice:  I am going to order a LE II in October. I have done my due diligence and believe that this is the best built RV around. I have made 2 trips to the factory and soon will make the purchase. Today, I went to look at tow vehicles. I am a GMC/Chevrolet person. I have owned a couple of Chevy Trucks. The one I currently own is a year 2000 that has 210,000 miles on it and it has treated me well for 18 years. Today, I drove a Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD Truck Double Cab. It has the towing package, a 4.10 Gear Rear Axle, 6.0 Gas Engine. It can tow 14,200 lbs, capable tongue weight 1500 lb. Price out the door is $42,275. This price was written up within 10 minutes after the test drive. I did not negotiate because I told them I was going to buy in September or October. I am sure that there is still some room on the price going a bit lower with patience.

 

I believe that this truck is more than capable of doing what I need it to do with an Olive LE II. It also gives me a lot of flexibility in the future. This forum has always been very helpful to me and many others. My question is..... Does anyone see a reason that this truck could not be fully capable of towing  an Oliver for many years. Thanks and additionally, I enjoy reading this forum every day!

 

 


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Sounds like a very capable truck to me. Should have no problem pulling and Oliver. Mike


Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | The Lone Star Oliver #135 | 2016 Ram 1500 Crew Cab 4X4 5.7L Hemi

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francesm,

 

Some very good advice here. One thing I can add is to be very vigilant for "Flood Cars". They are abundant. Have a trusted mechanic physically check as it may not show up in a CF report.

 

Cheers from Nashville,


Legacy Elite I

#240

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. My question is….. Does anyone see a reason that this truck could not be fully capable of towing an Oliver for many years. Thanks and additionally, I enjoy reading this forum every day!

Is it 4wd?

 

Since you tend to keep vehicles a VERY long time, getting 4wd would be prudent since you never know where you might be living in a decade, and there are definitely going to be times when the xtra traction will save your vacation... plus the feature makes it easier to sell in the future.

 

Otherwise, the specs are great and it should provide a reasonably effortless tow, except in the very steep high passes of the west, where you will have to work it hard.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

 

 


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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I will always have 4WD on a truck. I wish I had 4 WD on my tractor. It is a shame that I am leery of other brands. I like Toyota a whole bunch but have never fell in love with the Tundra. Now if the Tundra looked like the Tacoma and was a 3/4, my new Toyota Truck would already be in the driveway.


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I have a 17 F250 2WD crew cab.  I got the 6.2 v8 with 3.73 rear end.  Previous tow vehicle was a Tundra ( which is a great tow vehicle).  My reasons for getting the  250 were

 

1.  class 5 hitch - built-in sway control : Anderson not legally required.  I have a back problem.

 

2. Safety equipment.  Has look-back mirrors and  radar in tail lamps.   The older I get, the more careless I am.

 

3. Has 9 cameras which make backing up and hitching by myself a breeze.  Cameras do have zoom.

 

4. 6.2  uses older technology, but it is reliable.  Tundra had 4:30 rear end and 5.7 V8.

 

5. Bigger brakes, axles, tires, and wt carrying capacities.

 

The negatives are:

 

1.  Bigger turning radius.

 

2.Parking spaces may be tight.

 

3. Rides hard.

 

I believe the new Chevys  offer the same capabilities.

 

Came with tow hooks.

 

 

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The Chevy 2500HD, 4WD that I drove rode a little hard on the interstate as well but it is a truck. It was a double cab with more then enough room for our 2 Cairn Terriers. It did not necessarily scream buy me, buy me at this time. I hope that prices will decline a tad when the 2019's start to roll in. I really should take a look at other manufacturers

 

 

 

 

 

 


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The Chevy 2500HD, 4WD that I drove rode a little hard on the interstate as well but it is a truck. It was a double cab with more then enough room for our 2 Cairn Terriers. It did not necessarily scream buy me, buy me at this time. I hope that prices will decline a tad when the 2019’s start to roll in. I really should take a look at other manufacturers

 

It screamed at me when I test drove it. :-) A few 2019's are starting to come in so some dealers with a lot of  inventory are  starting to offer some good deals. It does ride a little rough on the interstate when empty but when the Ollie is hooked to it and gear is loaded it feels a lot better. It does not ride, turn, or park like our Tundra but its a big truck and when towing it is a dream and we primarily use it for a tow vehicle.

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Tom & Cheryl 

LE II #305

2018 GMC 2500HD SLT Duramax

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A good thing is to check CarFax for the locations the vehicle was registered in versus dates. This may give a clue as to whether it was potentially in a flood. When looking at a vehicle for one of our daughters we came across a car that was in New Orleans in 2005 (Katrina). It has also been registered to multiple owners since 2005 and the time we were looking at it. Katrina was a well known event but there have certainly been plenty of other foods since. Not a gurantee that the vehicle wasn’t “just visiting” and got flooded but one more thing to look at for clues. - Randy

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2018 LE2 STD #365


2018 GMC 2500HD SLT Duramax 4x4

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My two cents, having just gone through this decision making process. Having proved to myself my well traveled and always reliable 2004 GMC 4x4 5.3L,  1/2 ton was marginal at towing the bigger Ollie, especially where elevation is involved, I did a lot of research (for months as I waited on my ollie) on the 3/4 ton truck market. I ruled out Ram, nothing wrong with them, I just don't like the way they look. I was strongly leaning towards a Ford Power stroke diesel, and having driven several, including a 2019, I was price shopping, looking for a used or new crew cab 4x4. ( The "used" owners as a group, all  $Highly$ valued their trucks)

 

I considered a gas engine, in GM and Ford, but the fuel economy and power characteristics, just didn't meet my objective. The gas engines rev much higher when meeting their upper HP/Torque ranges (what I would experience towing)  and the gas mileage is never much better than bout 14mpg, and less than 10 when towing - as best I could determine.  Despite the upfront cost of the Diesel engines and slightly higher maintenance costs,  I decided on the diesel powerplant - I figured my breakeven between the two powerplants to be about 100K miles.  Additionally, the better diesel fuel mileage should  bridge the gap on price diff between regular unleaded and diesel. All the first hand accounts I had from current owners of each related about 14/15 towing, and up to 20 when unloaded, freeway driving. With a grain of salt, I will see where I end up. TBD

 

As the 2019's began to arrive, the dealers in my locality began to come of the prices of the 2018's, and a GMC dealer actually had a truck just like I wanted, and, at an attractive "beginning" price. Now mind you, I drove back and forth testing this truck against the Ford, and comparing. The GMC, I felt, was much nicer, and had a quality level in the interior that was superior to the Ford, (same trim levels). Power plants were comparable, Duramax vs the Powerstoke, however the GMC had a more robust payload rating (by 300lbs), and the GVWR and max towing were about the same. Compare the actual B pillar stickers, not the  brochures, as options drive actual weight ratings.

 

The GMC rode slightly better on the road, country and multilane, and actually felt more torquey. I also preferred the looks of the GMC over the Ford. In the end I went with the GMC, as they were much more price competitive, as the Ford people were not as flexible.

 

Now to be sure, when my SO indicated she preferred the GMC, my fate was sealed.  I purchased a 2018 GMC 2500 SLT Crew cab, 4x4 with the new diesel Duramax engine  with Allison 6 speed auto (the powerplant was updated in 2017, basically 95% new design)  The price ended up better than I had planned, and my first 300 miles have been satisfying.

 

There are many options out there,  when properly selected most will adequately tow the Ollie, my decision was what fit my objective. Power to spare, chassis designed for heaver tow loads, engine exhaust braking, and comfortable ride characteristics and spousal approval.

 

What I settled for  -heavy duty chassis, brake systems and powerplant that are more than a match for the Ollies 7k max load, and a fairly nice ride.  Once I get the  Leer 100 xlt topper installed I should be good to go.... well ok, I'm sure there will be more.....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"

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Wow, that's a lot for a new person to absorb, I would be lost by now if it wasn't that I worked for Chevrolet Motor Division for some 35 years giving me a pretty good idea what works and what doesn't.  A lot on good recommendations, but buying used is another thing and will require the knowledge of others that can help you with the decision process, were talking mechanical knowledge here and commonsense. Now, not that I might not buy a 3/4 ton pickup, but with the Oliver just about any 1/2 ton pickup with a 5.0/6.0 V8 should work just fine, but one with a tow package from the factory would be even better. Find one with a GVWR rating of around 8000 lbs. if you can, probably most will be in the 7000 lb. range, you will find the GVWR on most LF Door post. Some 8ply tires would also not be a bad thing to have, as many used vehicles could has lessor quality tires for replacements, consider higher rated tires as something you might want to upgrade to. Main thing is know your minimum requirements and don't let sales personal sway you away from that. When you find what you are looking for, buy it, don't spend too much time on haggling with the price, because it probably won't be there when you really decide you want it.

 

trainman

 

 

 

 


Elite II, Twin Bed, Hull #489, 2019 RAM 1500, 5.7 Hemi, 4X4, Crew Cab, 5'7" bed, Towing Package, 3.92 Gears.

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A diesel truck? Your research is solid. I have stayed away from them because I have heard horrible stories about injectors going bad early. Also, I hear stories about $100 oil changes. Yet, they still intrigue me. I don't mind oil changes but injectors.... With that said, since I have never bought a vehicle and sold it until it had 200K miles, I should look and drive the diesels. Thanks for the solid info. Sometimes this research becomes not so fun!

 

 


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We HAD a 2014 GMC Sierra SLT with the 6.2L gasoline engine. It had the max tow package and could tow over 11,000 pounds. Combined with the Outlaw Oliver II we weighed between 14,000 and 15,000 pounds, ready to travel, going down the road. Fuel mileage was never greater than 12 mpg average.

 

Our current diesel Silverado 2500HD gets 15% better fuel mileage even though the combo now weighs between 17,000 and 18,000 pounds.


Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

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Re mileage. If you plan to tow many thousands of miles annually, as in 10k or more, a diesel may be a great choice. The extra range and economy will pay for the significantly higher fuel and routine maintenance costs. I am satisfied with my Toyata 5.7 gas truck and its 10-12 mpgs towing because I will not put more than 5000 towing miles on it annually, and I do not use it for commuting.

 

I have owned a Cummis 5.9 and loved the bottomless power and 900 mile range, but not the $3500 it cost me mid-vacation to replace the ENTIRE hydraulic system - pump, hydraboost brake booster and steering rack - due to a failed pump sending metal throughout the system (gas engined trucks have a much simpler system.) The newer engines with DEF and exhaust particle filters are an order of magnitude more trouble prone than my pre-emission truck, and if you own one out of warranty you had better have very deep pockets. Labor costs on the V8s are very steep, the tech has to pull the cab off the frame for certain repairs. IF I were to buy a new one, it would be an inline Cummins, for the ease of servicing.

 

The diesel engines in the heavy duty trucks are super heavy and negatively impact your payload numbers and wear out the front suspension. My Ram’s ball joints were completely shot at 80,000 miles.

 

Anyway, I love Land Cruisers and if it got 8 mpgs I would still own one.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

 

 


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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A diesel truck? Your research is solid. I have stayed away from them because I have heard horrible stories about injectors going bad early. Also, I hear stories about $100 oil changes. Yet, they still intrigue me. I don’t mind oil changes but injectors…. With that said, since I have never bought a vehicle and sold it until it had 200K miles, I should look and drive the diesels. Thanks for the solid info. Sometimes this research becomes not so fun!

 

 

A lot of improvements have been made in diesels. Easy to change fuel filters and systems that monitor them and any water in the fuel with new technology and popularly have helped a lot. Diesel is more available at gas stations and does not stay in the ground a long time to get water in it like it used to. The super low sulfer fuel has helped too. I stay away from gas stations that look like they may not pump much fuel and try to go to stations along the main drags that probably pump more fuel. Large truck stops pump a lot of fuel and your probably going the always get good fuel at them when traveling. Its all about good fuel with injectors.

 

The Duramax engines have a 100,000 mile warranty now so they feel pretty good about their product.

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Tom & Cheryl 

LE II #305

2018 GMC 2500HD SLT Duramax

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Like most things in life, every story has its own unique facts. Having a good amount of  experience with the Mercedes diesel in their Sprinter vans, I went into my Diesel truck search wide eyed and skeptical - as I do with most things. Not to get to far into the weeds - with the vast amount of information available on the web these days, researching anything doesn't take long, and you can develop a good baseline of fact.

 

Speaking of the GM Duramax - there have been several generations -all experiencing unique "issues" - the first generations had injector issues, the second had... - you get the idea. The ford power stroke is similar, as is the Cummings powerplant. The current generation of Duramax is a design that seeks to capitalize on the history of the past -and a 5yr -100,000 mile warranty seems to back that up. Ford is similar.  Complexity - well, certainly todays engines are much more complex - look into a direct injection, variable valve timing, dual overhead cam, turbo driven, gas engine and compare to the older push rod V-8 - no contest. Its a sign of the times. Emissions regulation drive this complexity.  No getting around it. Maintenance- oil changes and fuel filters are simple things, and as I do my own, its just the basic cost of oil and filters that drives the expense.

 

As John stated, your travel plans may dictate your decisions. As we plan to put a vast amount of asphalt (not to mention gravel, dirt, and mud) behind us in the future, the  GMC SLT w/diesel - and the Oliver are central in that plan.  Worrying about equipment capability, reliability and less than optimum comfort is something I seek to reduce if not eliminate. This is not our first, (second or third)  rodeo, and having made trade offs in the past, leaves me knowing I hope to do better this time around.

 

This I know - there is no one correct answer, the truth lies with-in, satisfying yourself (and your SO...) is a wise and important goal.  Set your objectives, decide on what  you hope to achieve in a tow vehicle and have fun. The possibilities are vast. Good luck in the journey.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"

ALAZARCACOFLIDMTNVNMOKORTNTXUTWAWYd56201524964bac5483378b34b491562080842sm.jpg

 

 

 

 

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As mentioned, the problem with diesels today is that it's very difficult to outweigh the added initial cost and increased fuel price with fuel savings.  If you're buying diesel, you're primarily doing it for a) range, and b) torque.  When we were looking, I calculated the payback period for an F250 diesel over a Raptor to be 17.1 years, assuming 5,000 miles of towing per year and 8,000 daily driving.  So for us, the range (510 miles +/-) vs the Raptor (325 miles +/-) was the primary advantage.

 

As far as power and torque go, the advantage of diesels has been greatly reduced with the availability of turbo engines, particularly at altitude.  We've been very pleased with the EcoBoost engine.  Granted, we have the high output version, but the standard 3.5 isn't really that far behind.   To throw a little math into the discussion, I was intrigued by John's post the other day about having to shift into low range in mountain passes, so out of curiosity I did some quick calculations of how much forward thrust was actually being provided at the wheels for a few trucks.  In that case, he was talking about low speed acceleration coming out of switchbacks, at ~8,000 feet.  I thought that was a really good example of real world towing power vs the advertised numbers that we usually use to compare vehicles - because in the end, it's the subjective experience in situations like that which really counts.

 

So, in that example, assuming 8,000' altitude, pulling in 1st gear at around 2,500 rpm, and ignoring drivetrain losses:

 

In the case of John's Land Cruiser, that's ~360 lb ft of torque @ 2500 rpm, less 3% per 1000' of altitude (86.4), times his first gear ratio of 4.79 and diff ratio of 3.31 (John said 3.8 but I think 3.31 is correct unless he's changed it).  So (360-86.4)*4.79*3.31=4337.9 lb ft at the axles.  Divide that by his tire radius of 1.375' (33" tires) gives a forward thrust of 3,154.84 lbs through 4 wheels.  No surprise then that he'd want to shift into low range, which gave him an extra multiplier of 2.64, for 8,265.7 lbs thrust.  Quite a difference and a nifty trick that he can do that.

 

In contrast, a diesel F250, at I'm guessing 1,800 rpm or so, would give a massive 935 lb ft of torque at sea level, which translates to 711 lb ft. at 8,000 ft.  So, 711*3.97(1st)*3.31(diff)/1.34(stock tires)=6,972.4 lbs thrust, or well over twice the Land Cruiser.  So it's clear why people like diesels.

 

But wait, my EcoBoost can maintain 510 lb ft of torque up to 10,000', and has a 4.10 read end, so we have 510*4.69*4.1/1.4 (34.5" tires) = 7,004.85 lbs thrust.  EcoBoost for the win.

 

At least at altitude.  At sea level, those diesels can't be beat at the low end.

 

BTW, that Honda Ridgeline that people keep asking about? (175-42)*3.36*4.25/1.23=1,544.1 lbs.  Bless its little heart.

 

My takeaway is that I don't think I'd ever buy a truck with naturally aspirated gas engine for towing.  John's case with his LC is really unique I think, in that he does have the option to shift into low range on pavement.  Otherwise, if you're the sort who absolutely has to have a V8 for whatever reason, just please be polite and use the pull outs.

 

Addendum: another good reason to opt for a diesel is true engine braking.  I haven't had any real issues and in tow mode my truck does a really good job of downshifting, but let's face it, it's not the same.

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Snowball • LE2 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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Interesting Snowball. I'm running a 3.73 rear end, not sure why you derate for altitude, my diesel is turbo as are most, in the end its personal preferences. I put 30K on a 3.5 Ecoboost - it was an impressive engine in my XLT 350 Transit Van, altitude didn't matter to the little engine that could.  Had the Van been rated to tow more I would still be driving it - with the Oliver behind it.  I doubt very seriously any ecobost  would out run  a current Duramax truck up any hill , at any speed, at any weight above 5000 lbs . Just sayin.. With a smile .

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Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"

ALAZARCACOFLIDMTNVNMOKORTNTXUTWAWYd56201524964bac5483378b34b491562080842sm.jpg

 

 

 

 

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I was intrigued by John’s post the other day about having to shift into low range in mountain passes, so out of curiosity I did some quick calculations of how much forward thrust was actually being provided at the wheels for a few trucks.

VERY cool analysis, thank you!

 

A minor correction, MY 2013 6 speed 200 does indeed have 3.90 axles, the Tundra with tow package is 4.30. The later 8 speed 200 has the taller gears you quoted, for some weird reason that completely baffles Land Cruiser fanatics. (They missed the chance to build a really capable tow rig.) I have been debating about spending the $2500 needed to install either Tundra ring and pinions or a set of 4.88s. The latter would really move my trailer. I could tow on the flats in fifth and I would have a better spread of climbing gears. Mileage would probably remain the same unladen, or improve while towing. Sixth is a really tall gear (0.5:1 and the truck does not stay in it on any sort of grade.

 

Poor Ridgeline owners. Stay in Florida please.

 

Another BTW, the high output Raptor motor will be an option in the newest high spec F-150s. They would make great towing weapons.  ... https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2018/07/26/2019-f-150-limited-gains-high-output-ecoboost-v6.html

 

Thanks again, you really made my day.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

 

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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Interesting Snowball. I’m running a 3.73 rear end, not sure why you derate for altitude, my diesel is turbo as are most, in the end its personal preferences. I put 30K on a 3.5 Ecoboost – it was an impressive engine in my XLT 350 Transit Van, altitude didn’t matter to the little engine that could. Had the Van been rated to tow more I would still be driving it – with the Oliver behind it. I doubt very seriously any ecobost would out run a current Duramax truck up any hill , at any speed, at any weight above 5000 lbs . Just sayin.. With a smile .

 

Good point - I wasn't even thinking about the Diesels also being turbos, duh, so even more power to them.

 

We should have a hill climb competition at the next rally, lol.  I might be able to pull ahead at higher speeds, but then I'd have to stop for fuel halfway up.

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Snowball • LE2 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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We should have a hill climb competition at the next rally, lol. I might be able to pull ahead at higher speeds, but then I’d have to stop for fuel halfway up.

 

We could get Coy to have the park block off the back way up to the lodge and could have a hill climb from the campground to the lodge. :-)

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Tom & Cheryl 

LE II #305

2018 GMC 2500HD SLT Duramax

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