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Punch list for new delivery purchases

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Some time ago, I requested suggestions on "must have" items to have on hand when we take delivery of our Elite II (early spring, 2019).

 

This is our first trailer so seasoned suggestions are great and we got plenty of them via the forum.

 

I am putting together a short list of items to procure starting now and would ask for additional finite details for the items I list as well as suggestions for some absolutely necessary items that I have omitted.

 

I will try to break it down by categories of hardware vs interior items (dishes, towels, sheets, etc.)

 

In all instances, suggestions as to specific brands and places to procure are most welcome.

 

Here is the starting point:

<p style="text-align: center;">Hardware: </p>

Plug converters:  50 AMP to 30 AMP: 120 volt (house) to 30 AMP (any others??)

 

External Surge Protection:  (In addition to the built in one) Yes or No??  If yes, which one?

 

Wheel chock or "X" blocks:  Which one?  Both?  How many of each?

 

Extra 25' potable water hose: (brand?)

 

Extra 25' water hose.

 

Extra 25' 10 gauge extension cord.

 

Jack stand blocks: which ones?

 

External water filters.  On this point, is there not one already in-line inside the trailer?  In either case, do I need an external filter too and which one?

 

Hitch lock for BullDog 2 5/16" coupler.  Which one?

 

Extra grey water discharge hose: Yes/No?    What if any accessories for discharge lines?

 

For composting toilet:  What kind of toilet paper?  What kind of media and how much?

 

Tool Kit:  List of tools that are needed or desired.  Is there a fairly comprehensive tool kit for RVers that already exists?

 

 

<p style="text-align: center;">Interior Items (Donna's domain)</p>

Cookware:  (Pots, Pans,etc. )Suggestions as to "what" and where to purchase RV specific items (also looking for good sources).

 

Utensils: Spatulas, serving pieces,, forks, knives, spoons, etc. (also looking for good sources) (RV specific?)

 

Dishware: plates, bowls, glasses, cups, coffee mugs, serving items, etc. (also looking for good sources) (RV specific?)

 

Napkin and paper towel holder/dispenser.

 

Utensil and plate organizers:  Suggestions

 

Dish soap and hand soap (storage).

 

Paper towel dispenser:  Type, location, how to attach?

 

Towels (bath and hand) RV unique?

 

Fitted linens sheets for the upgraded single bed mattresses available as an option from Oliver.

 

Inside entrance matt:(brand/size?)

 

Ground matt at exterior entrance to trailer:

 

Extra matt for outside of bath area: (Yes/No?) (We're getting the teak floor covering for bath and sink from Foy)

 

Trash receptacle: (??)

 

Toiletry organization suggestions:

 

Any kind of cabinet or closet organizers that are essential:

 

Toasters:

 

Coffee maker:  (We like GOOD coffee and grinder but want to know if there is something smaller  for an RV)

 

 

<p style="text-align: center;">Other stuff that we MUST HAVE at pickup???????</p>

We'll worry about food, drink etc.

 

Please feel free to comment add or delete but please keep in mind that we're trying to prepare for essential  items needed at time of delivery and time of pickup and  don't intend to purchase every nice-to-have item.  If we did that, we probably couldn't pay for the trailer.

 

 

 

All for now.  Thanks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Thanks 2

2018 Elite II, Hull #414 (the very last 2018 produced).  Trailer name "2 HOBOS" .   2006 Dodge 3500 Megacab, 4x4 with 5.9L Cummins diesel.

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Plug converters: We've yet to run into a campsite that didn't have 30a service, though I guess there's one out there.  

 

External Surge Protection: If you have the built in then I wouldn't

 

Wheel chock or “X” blocks: We tried the X-chocks and found them to be unreliable and a PITA to use.  I prefer the cheapy hard rubber chocks, four of them.  

 

Extra 25′ potable water hose: Not necessary to spend extra on these, but they're nice.  

 

Jack stand blocks: I use the Camco legos.  I should probably find something lighter and less bulky though.

 

External water filters. We have this one but have yet to use it - I wouldn't call it essential, but their 'essential system' would be the one to get.

 

Extra grey water discharge hose: We have a cheap 100' garden hose from Home Depot that I got because it was...grey.

 

For composting toilet: We use regular TP - nothing you get will have time to degrade much all before you dump, so it's really just a question of bulk.  We prefer peat over the coco, and just carry three or four gallon ziplocks of it in case we need to dump the toilet while travelling.  

 

Tool Kit: I think there are a few lists/threads on it if you search.  I carry way too many, and then bring more just in case, so I'll limit my advice to just a decent screwdriver and wrench/socket sets, hex set, some vice grips/pliers, utility knife, etc.  A rubber mallet is indispensable for knocking chocks out.  A multimeter can be handy.  Tire gauge.  Gloves.  A few repair items are good to have: gorilla tape, assorted zip ties, self fusing silicone tape, butyl tape, screen repair kit, fuses.

 

Cookware: The Magma set is pricey but you won't regret it.  Also, also, and also.

 

Utensils: Most of the RV specific things we bought ended up getting quickly replaced by duplicates from our kitchen.  For us, there's enough room in the drawers not to worry about space saving products.  Here are a few things that we really do like though: tumble trivets, drying mat, wine crate

 

Dishware: We have these.  Cute, but that's about all I can say for them.  On my to do list is to find a way to safely carry real dishes.  We also end up using paper plates more than we should.   I spent a small fortune on Strahl glassware since I figured they're used in restaurants so they'd hold up, but after one trip they were cloudy and covered in scratches.  You could probably run over them with a truck though and they'd survive.  But we just bought a few of these to try and have high hopes.  

 

Utensil and plate organizers:  These and these fit the drawers really well.

 

Dish soap and hand soap:  We just keep a small bottle of Dawn in the pantry.  I'm used to one of these at home for hand soap, so I got one for the trailer.

 

Paper towel dispenser: We love this one.  Above the sink with screws and caulk.

 

Inside entrance matt:  This fits the space almost perfectly

 

Ground matt at exterior entrance to trailer: This one does the job

 

Extra matt for outside of bath area: Definitely needed - we have this one.

 

Trash receptacle: We bought this but it's too big and we don't do a good job of separating the recyclables.  But it does fit well under the dinette and travels well in the shower.  We have a tiny little pedal bin from Ikea in the bath but they don't seem to make it anymore.

 

Toiletry organization suggestions: We use these in the bath cabinet.  Also these with the clear tops.

 

Any kind of cabinet or closet organizers that are essential: We use these for clothes.  If you can find the Rubbermaid bento boxes, the medium size works great in the upper cabinets.  Unfortunately it doesn't look like they make them anymore.

 

Toasters: The Breville Mini is one of the few (perhaps the only one?) that fits in the microwave cabinet

 

Coffee maker: Join the dark side.  I'm still shocked how good these are.  It travels in the sink.

 

Other stuff that we MUST HAVE at pickup???????

Patience.

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Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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We do the following:

 

Plug converters: 50 AMP to 30 AMP: 120 volt (house) to 30 AMP (any others??)  -- I have a 30 to 15 converter, use a cheap voltage/continuity/phase/GFCI tester. I test every site before hook up, cheap peace of mind. No need for 50 to 3o in my mind

 

External Surge Protection: (In addition to the built in one) Yes or No?? If yes, which one? ----No need in my mind.

 

Wheel chock or “X” blocks: Which one? Both? How many of each?  --- Doesn't hurt to have two, I use the Anderson block system and just use the smaller end as blocks. Probably make something a little better, probably out of wood.

 

Extra 25′ potable water hose: (brand?) I have one, only because I had it already, and you get one with the Ollie purchase.

 

Extra 25′ 10 gauge extension cord. - I have a nice orange 40 footer I Amazoned. Mainly for home use where I needed a longer cord. You may or may not use it, but for the $$ its good insurance.

 

Jack stand blocks: which ones? I found a use for the pile of 2x10 cut-offs I had stacked in the back. I cut about 15 for blocking, store in the front tray.

 

External water filters. On this point, is there not one already in-line inside the trailer? In either case, do I need an external filter too and which one?    --- I use the Oliver supplied filter, pressure reducer, and hose.

 

Hitch lock for BullDog 2 5/16″ coupler. Which one? --- For the $70K investment,  I purchased and use the "Bull" by Gushill Industries - https://gushill.com/product/the-bull-bulldog-hitch-lock

 

Extra grey water discharge hose: Yes/No? What if any accessories for discharge lines?    ----- Nope

 

For composting toilet: What kind of toilet paper? What kind of media and how much?    ---- Regular, we put it in a trash bag, not the toilet

 

Tool Kit: List of tools that are needed or desired. Is there a fairly comprehensive tool kit for RVers that already exists?   ----- Several post on this, personal preference I would think. Mine seems to grow with each trip.....

 

The rest - what pleases you.

 

RB

 

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Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"

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The accessories that Oliver provides (hoses, etc) will pretty much get you through an initial pick up trip. You are going to want to get some “just in case” items, so it doesn’t hurt to show up with those at pick up.

 

Plug converters: I’ve got a 30a to 50a and have only used it a couple of times. I also have a 30a to 20a and use it when the trailer is in the storage area.

 

External Surge Protection: If you have the built in you shouldn’t need an external. We don’t have the built in and I carry a Camco external. It has a 60 second delay when first plugged in to check the circuit and if it’s okay it passes electricity. If not it blinks yellow or red.

 

Wheel chock or “X” blocks: We carry both. The chocks are good if the tires on on the ground. If I drive onto legos to level the chocks aren’t so good. I got a cheap “X” block that fits between the wheels and you turn a handle on top to tighten for the side that might be on legos.

 

Extra 25′ potable water hose: I have a black collapsible hose that I use to flush the black tank. I think it expands to 50’. It’s also used with a nozzle for general clean up tasks.

 

Extra 25′ water hose. We got an extra at Camping World. There have been a few sites that required two hoses to reach the water. One hose is enough for most sites.

 

Extra 25′ 10 gauge extension cord. I carry one and have never used it in over 35K miles and 250 nights of camping.

 

Jack stand blocks: which ones? We got the yellow Camco pads. I made some blocks out of 2X6’s and set them on the pads. We also use the yellow legos that we got at Walmart for leveling.

 

External water filters. On this point, is there not one already in-line inside the trailer? In either case, do I need an external filter too and which one? I don’t think there is an internal filter. We use the blue or white filters that you can get at Walmart or Camping World.

 

Hitch lock for BullDog 2 5/16″ coupler. Which one?

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HL2NM0K/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Extra grey water discharge hose: Yes/No? What if any accessories for discharge lines? We used the hoses that came with the trailer for black and gray discharge for over a year. Replaced them with Rinoflex and carry the old as back up. We also got a clear 90 degree fitting for the end that goes into the sewer so I can see what’s being dumped.

 

For composting toilet: What kind of toilet paper? What kind of media and how much? We flush!

 

Tool Kit: List of tools that are needed or desired. Is there a fairly comprehensive tool kit for RVers that already exists? Yes, there are a couple of tool list threads.

 

Cookware: (Pots, Pans,etc. )Suggestions as to “what” and where to purchase RV specific items (also looking for good sources): We didn’t buy much, just repurposed extra stuff we had in the house. It depends on how you cook.

 

Utensils: Spatulas, serving pieces,, forks, knives, spoons, etc. (also looking for good sources) (RV specific?). Mostly stuff we already had.

 

Dishware: plates, bowls, glasses, cups, coffee mugs, serving items, etc. (also looking for good sources) (RV specific?): We have some Corelle dishes and some plastic cups, mugs, wine glasses. We also carry paper for those places that don’t have hookups.

 

Napkin and paper towel holder/dispenser.

 

Utensil and plate organizers:

 

Dish soap and hand soap (storage). We use the pump dispensers.

 

Paper towel dispenser: Type, location, how to attach? We found a cheap plastic one on Amazon and stuck it over the kitchen counter with On Command Tape. It’s been there over 2 years, no problems.

 

Towels (bath and hand) RV unique? We bought some microfiber bath towels. They don’t take up much room and are functional. Just not as nice as a big fluffy cotton towel.

 

Fitted linens sheets for the upgraded single bed mattresses available as an option from Oliver: We got regular twin sheets and just tuck them in. Also twin blankets and bed spreads. We’re on our second set.

 

Inside entrance matt:(brand/size?) We have a 16X24 mat just inside the door. It has a grippy rubber bottom. We also use a runner between the beds we got at Walmart.

 

Ground matt at exterior entrance to trailer: There’s a bunch to choose from at Amazon or Camping World.

 

Extra matt for outside of bath area: (Yes/No?) (We’re getting the teak floor covering for bath and sink from Foy): We use a round bath rug that is in the bathroom when we’re not showering and then we set it outside the bathroom when we shower.

 

Trash receptacle: We have a small plastic one with a lid that pops up. Plastic shopping bags fit it nicely. Not sure where it came from.

 

Toiletry organization suggestions: Shampoo and soap bottles can fit in the area under the sink. We have a couple of low plastic boxes in the area above the toilet for other toiletries.

 

Any kind of cabinet or closet organizers that are essential:

 

Toasters: Cheap two hole toaster.

 

Coffee maker: (We like GOOD coffee and grinder but want to know if there is something smaller for an RV): We carry a Nespresso Pixie and also a Melita pour over cone and a small electric grinder. When boondocking we heat water on the propane cook top and use the pour over into a thermos. When we have electricity we use the Nespresso.

 

In general, I wouldn’t worry about getting too much stuff. We carry less now than we did the year we picked up. It’s easy enough to acquire things as you see the need, stores are everywhere. After you’re out a few times you’ll get a feel for what you need and don’t need. Mike

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Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram Rebel 4X4 5.7L Hemi

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On 10/22/2018 at 6:16 AM, Mike and Carol said:

Extra 25′ 10 gauge extension cord. I carry one and have never used it in over 35K miles and 250 nights of camping.

I bought one of these 30 Amp extension cords before our Ollie pickup, based upon older threads (here and here) with lists of what is needed for pickup. 

28962740_ScreenShot2020-07-29at4_06_05PM.thumb.png.2651609408bbf322c6f5f045d939e5d9.png

I never needed the extension cord either, until this this state park campground, where the power pedestal and water spigot were on the wrong side, well behind the asphalt pad. The power cord would not reach, even when passing the cord under the trailer between the tires.

2020-07-28-203356Canon.thumb.jpg.50b2e46d321cb43a0a5c18e5f9547904.jpg

I was pleased that I did have this extension cord in the box of "rarely needed" items in the tow vehicle. It cost $33 when I bought it, $48 now. Good insurance, like a lot of the stuff we carry. 

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David Stillman, Salt Lake City, Utah

2016 Oliver Elite II  Hull 164    |    2017 Audi Q7 tow vehicle. 

Travel and Photography Blog: http://davidstravels.net

 

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Posted (edited)

My best advice is to start with the bare essentials and see what you need/want after you have been on a few journeys.  It is easy to buy way too many "things" only to find later that some are not essential.  If you are starting new (first time RVer) you will need more than if you already have an RV set up.  

This being said, know that I am the "Galley Expert"; my husband doesn't cook and I don't venture into the "Tool Man's" territory 😉

Disclaimer: Everyone does things differently; there are no set-in-stone requirements when it comes to RV life.

Magma pots and pans: Magma pans are great, but certainly not essential.  We got by for a time with an inexpensive set of camping pots and pans. It all depends on if you are a minimalist cook or more of a pro chef; or if you will be camping vs full-timing.  I initially got the basic 7-piece Magma set plus the carrying bag.  Since then, I have added the colander and the saute pan. They all nest together and these additional pieces don't take up more space (besides I might need them).  They do add to your payload, if that is a concern.  If you think you want all of these, then the 10-piece set is more economical.  You save a few $$$$ from buying the 7-pc set and adding to it later.  With the larger set you get the additional two pieces (above) and 2 additional sizes of saucepans.  It also comes with an extra handle which is needed with so many pans.  Get the non-slip pads that protect the pans.  You're paying a lot for these pans, you don't want them scratched! 

If you plan to use an induction burner, ordinary camping pots won't do.  If this is your plan, be sure to get the induction Magma set.  I opted for the ceramic coated version, but not the "Professional".  The difference is the professional can go in the oven (which Oliver doesn't have).  Unless you also plan to use them at home.  Others may chime in with other opinions regarding Magma.

Appliances: With storage at a premium, appliances must be chosen wisely.  Again, what you want/need depends on how you will be using your Oliver.  We downsized from a large 5th-wheel to a small motorhome a few years ago, so have pretty much pared down our appliance lineup to an Oliver appropriate size.  Here is what I have on board:

Coffee appliances: Stovetop percolator or French Press.  I will occasionally pack a Moka Pot.  We grind beans in advance of a short trip or take a hand grinder for road trips.  Also, an electric tea kettle (not essential, but good for making a pot of French Press when both stovetop burners are in use.  These choices depend on your coffee making style.  Some like an Aeropress (takes up little space); or a simple pour-over setup.  Many are tea drinkers.  There are many ways to get your daily dose of caffeine.  

Toaster:  So, we have the two-slice toaster, but don't use it often and mostly when we have shore power.  We also have a stovetop toaster that we use when conserving power or just don't want to fire up the generator.  For our "soon to be Oliver", we are opting for a storage cabinet in place of the microwave.  We seldom use the microwave and can learn to live without.  My plan is to replace the 2-slice toaster with the Breville Mini Smart "toaster" oven we use at home.  It will ride in the extra storage cabinet and gives options for baking, etc as well as making toast.

Induction burner: this will be new territory for me.  I have always wanted one and since we already have induction cookware, this will give us an alternative to indoor cooking that quickly heats up the trailer.  Those who have one love it; not sure how I've managed without one.

These are pretty much it for our appliances.  We plan to camp in our Oliver while exploring the great outdoors; when we want the many conveniences of home, we stay home.  I have no desire to full-time in an RV.  The Instapot will stay home, as will the coffee maker and electric frypan.  We like to enjoy nature - hiking, biking, kayaking, and me, pursuing my passion for photography.  When on the road,  don't spend any more time than needed in the galley.  I prepare a lot of meals at home, as I do love creating meals from scratch.  With RV cooking, it is important to keep this in mind - the complexity of your meals dictates how many utensils and cooking accessories are needed. 

Campfire gear: Of course, I'm not including the various campfire "appliances" - we use a simple charcoal grill; others opt for a portable gas grill.  A dutch oven, if you like cooking over a fire, marshmallow/hot dog sticks, pie irons (versatile alternative to roasting stcks) and of course a trusty cast iron skillet.  These can all be organized in a tote and carried in the tow vehicle.  Depending on the circumstances, we sometimes take a two burner Jet Boil Base Camp propane stove for outdoors as well, especially if we are camping with family/friends.  Can we do that yet???

Cabinet organizers: I am an organization freak (just ask any of my pre-retirement coworkers).  I would definitely wait and see before purchasing too many organizing tools.  After several excursions you will move and relocate supplies many times before settling on the best storage arrangement.  I like to have the most used items in easy reach; less used can be somewhat buried.  You don't want to have to unload the entire storage bin to get the items you use most often.  That being said, totes will be your friend.  They help keep cabinets organized and prevent contents from rattling around.  Also, take advantage of the storage potential of your tow vehicle.

Sorry for such a long post (is there a post length limit here?  Am I going to be banned?)  There is so much I haven't said, and I am leaving the Tool Shed to those more capable (it's important to play dumb when it comes to mechanical things.  Then the better half will make necessary repairs 😃

I will end by saying, search the Internet for supply lists and get ideas from Family and Friend RVers.  Someone else's ideas are often overlooked.  If you find a great idea, share it here.  If you try something that doesn't work for you, simply look for a better way.    

Edited by Susan Huff

Ray and Susan Huff

Prospective Elite II Twin owners

2013 F350 3.2l Super Duty 4x4 long bed crew cab

2017 Leisure Travel Van Unity Twin Bed

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For us we were coming from a Casita, so we pretty much had our list of what was needed, the back of the Ram seat area was packed full, but not too much in the bed as we would be spending one travel night in a motel and didn't want to move stuff in and out at night. It's unbelievable how much room there is in the Ram Crew Cab back seat area, makes me wonder why anyone would want a small vehicle to travel in. We carry very little in the bed of the truck, our ebikes and a rug are about it. 

trainman 


Elite II, Twin Bed, Hull #489, 2019 RAM 1500, 5.7 Hemi, 4X4, Crew Cab, 5'7" bed, Towing Package, 3.92 Gears.

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