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I have a Honda 2200 inverter generator which I intend to use primarily with our new trailer for on board battery charging and running the AC.  I'd was considering picking up the Hutch Mtn propane conversion kit which allows the option to run on either gas or propane with just the turn of a switch.  Question is, does anyone have experience running the Elite 2 air conditioning with a 2200 generator fueled by propane?  Propane is less efficient than gas so I'm wondering if that could prevent me from using the Honda.  BTW, I did get the "soft start" for the AC unit.

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There is a rather large efficiency difference in propane vs gasoline. That generator has a max output of 2200 watts with a continuous output of 1800 watts. This is based on using gasoline. A gallon of gasoline has 125,000 BTU’s. A gallon of propane has 91,700 BTU’s. As you can see, the output is significantly lower with propane therefore it can’t produce as many watts. 

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Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

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13 hours ago, GAP said:

I have a Honda 2200 inverter generator which I intend to use primarily with our new trailer for on board battery charging and running the AC.  I'd was considering picking up the Hutch Mtn propane conversion kit which allows the option to run on either gas or propane with just the turn of a switch.  Question is, does anyone have experience running the Elite 2 air conditioning with a 2200 generator fueled by propane?  Propane is less efficient than gas so I'm wondering if that could prevent me from using the Honda.  BTW, I did get the "soft start" for the AC unit.

Hi GAP, I also have the Honda 2200 and I've had the Hutch mountain propane conversion kit for a while.  I prefer propane (hope to not have to carry gasoline) and I will be testing this soon as we pick up our trailer this week.  So if you are not in a huge hurry, stand by and I'll let you know if it works as soon as I have a warm enough day back home in NC to do some quick tests.  We have the Lithium package which also included the soft start. 

I will likely buy the companion Honda down the road and convert that to propane as well.  I eventually need 30 amps to charge the pair of Lithiums on days where solar can't keep up.

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John and Anita

2020 Oliver Elite II, Hull 688

Tow Vehicle:  2006 Silverado 2500HD Crew Cab.  6.6L Duramax

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We have the same setup and it works fine below 7000' as long as you have the soft start. I can't say how it does above 7000' because we have never needed it or tried it at those attitudes. 

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Tom & Cheryl 

LE II #305

2018 GMC 2500HD SLT Duramax

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3 hours ago, NCeagle said:

I will likely buy the companion Honda down the road and convert that to propane as well.  I eventually need 30 amps to charge the pair of Lithiums on days where solar can't keep up.

They can't be charged on 15 amps? Or are you simply wanting faster charging  ability (cueing in on word "need")?

Edited by Jim_Oker

Jim and  Yanna, Woodinville WA

2004 Ford E250 camper conversion

Oliver Elite II December 2020 delivery

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We have the same setup and it has worked well for us. But haven't tried it out at high elevation. But a/c probably not needed in the mountains.

Scott&Ricki


2017 Legacy Elite II Twin, Hull 225, The Bus


2007 Tundra


Prev: 2003 Casita, 2009 Weekend Warrior 

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I have the Champion 3400 watt duel fuel. There is a big difference in the wattage output when on propane, but my running watts are still ok for the ac on propane. Although it does run much quieter on propane maybe because of less wattage output.

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16 hours ago, Jim_Oker said:

They can't be charged on 15 amps? Or are you simply wanting faster charging  ability (cueing in on word "need")?

Yes - strictly charging capacity / time.  I suspect I "may" need extra charging capabilities on trips where I would be at 8-10K elevation and have to rely on electricity for heat, cooking, etc. due to propane challenges that can occur at these altitudes (gasoline for generators at these altitudes too perhaps?).  I would have bought a bigger, single generator, but I want the ability to mix and match needs vs. the type of trip I'm taking as well as not wanting to deal with the weight of a single unit.

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John and Anita

2020 Oliver Elite II, Hull 688

Tow Vehicle:  2006 Silverado 2500HD Crew Cab.  6.6L Duramax

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For what its worth to you - every summer for the past 15 years I've spent the better part of two months at altitudes ranging between 8-10 thousand feet.  To date, both in the Oliver and other campers, I've never had a problem with any of my stock propane appliances.  Perhaps I've just been lucky.

Bill

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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I have the both the Honda eu2000i and the Champion dual fuel 3400.  I purchased the latter to have the TT-30 outlet, the extra power, and to not have to carry gasoline in the back of the TV as it will be run on LP.  The Champion has a handle to allow it to be maneuvered in the back of our RAM 1500 TV.  I have sufficient hose to allow me to connect to the RV QC outlets.  It will meet my needs for power on ECO, but I usually don't need to run the A/C.  I did have purchase the low pressure regulator for the Champion, but have the option of using the provided high pressure regulator if I use this at home during a power outage where I would connect it to a propane tank directly.  It has a battery starter, but I have started it manually before it it works like it would with gas as the choke is still in play.

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David Caswell and Paula Saltmarsh


Hull 509 "The Swallow"

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3 hours ago, topgun2 said:

at altitudes ranging between 8-10 thousand feet.  To date, both in the Oliver and other campers, I've never had a problem with any of my stock propane appliances.

I've  not spent as much time at altitude as you  but I've  spent several days and nights in that same range and neither the Dometic fridge nor the Suburban furnace in  my van  have failed to work. I had some issues  with the igniter on the fridge  (it's  fully manual - a piezo button, and I've had some intermittent problems with it at lower elevation too, which I have easily solved by lighting the pilot with a "wand" style lighter, so I don't know if there was any contribution  from  elevation though this was particularly common up  at ~8-9K at Bryce).

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Jim and  Yanna, Woodinville WA

2004 Ford E250 camper conversion

Oliver Elite II December 2020 delivery

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9 hours ago, NCeagle said:

Yes - strictly charging capacity / time.  I suspect I "may" need extra charging capabilities on trips where I would be at 8-10K elevation and have to rely on electricity for heat, cooking, etc. due to propane challenges that can occur at these altitudes (gasoline for generators at these altitudes too perhaps?).  I would have bought a bigger, single generator, but I want the ability to mix and match needs vs. the type of trip I'm taking as well as not wanting to deal with the weight of a single unit.

Thanks - that makes sense. You  may find that you  use a fair bit of space heater assistance even  if your appliances keep working.

Jim and  Yanna, Woodinville WA

2004 Ford E250 camper conversion

Oliver Elite II December 2020 delivery

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Super interesting trip down the rabbit hole.  Really useful information so thanks to all on that.  It's great to know that it is possible to run the AC on a 2200i converted to work on propane.  Whew!  Really didn't want to travel with a spare gas can that speaks only to the gennie and not to any other component.

I did a bit of research this AM.  A few interesting points that seem to apply:

-  Propane regulators are supposedly "self regulating" so will adjust by their working nature to changes in altitude automatically adjust for pressure differential between atmosphere inside the tank and ambient atmosphere.

-  Propane is actually a mixture of propane and butane.  That ratio is changed in areas that offer seasonal mixtures with the winter mix having less butane.  It seems that the butane ignites poorly in high altitude as it requires more air to burn well.  The suggestions I saw were to purchase propane local or make sure you have a winter mix when going into altitude.

-  Same applies to cold with butane not doing well in freezing temps so, if winter camping, the winter mix will burn more efficiently.

-  Maintenance related issues can rear their ugly heads in both cold weather and high altitude.  From what I read, a side effect of burning propane is the production of water.  Supposedly, jet nozzles can get partially plugged with bit of rust so while burning good in optimal conditions, can fail in cold/altitude where they may have done fine if serviced

-  I ran into a few folks that claim the adjust their regulators to perform better in altitude.  Adjust back when in  lower altitude.  Does anyone have experience with this?

 

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6 hours ago, GAP said:

Propane is actually a mixture of propane and butane.  That ratio is changed in areas that offer seasonal mixtures with the winter mix having less butane.  It seems that the butane ignites poorly in high altitude as it requires more air to burn well.  The suggestions I saw were to purchase propane local or make sure you have a winter mix when going into altitude.

That is good information to know. Thanks for posting that! 

6 hours ago, GAP said:

I ran into a few folks that claim the adjust their regulators to perform better in altitude.  Adjust back when in  lower altitude.  Does anyone have experience with this?

I have a Genconnex propane conversion kit on my Honda EU2000, and they offer a free carburetor adaptor for use at elevations above 5000 feet. 

 

David Stillman, Salt Lake City, Utah

2016 Oliver Elite II  Hull 164    |    2017 Audi Q7 tow vehicle. 

Travel and Photography Blog: http://davidstravels.net

 

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Just a simple data point: During the second half of a recent hunting trip the temperatures averaged 24 degrees at night. In 6 days I used 7 1/2 gallons of propane for the RV heater, and only 2 gallons of propane to run the Honda 2200 for 3 hours every night. I have the Hutch Mountain conversion.

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theOrca,  2020 Legacy Elite II, Twin, Hull 615

Tow Vehicle - 2016 Ram 1500, Hemi, 8 Speed with 1500# rear springs and Goodyear bags.

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