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Where do you jack up a Oliver?


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thank you!

TV:  2019 F-150 SuperCrew Lariat, 3.5L EcoBoost, Max Tow, FX-4, Rear Locker      OLLIE:  2018 OE2 Hull 342, Twin Bed.    OLLIE DYI’s:  BB LiFePO4's, Victron 712 Smart, 350 Amp Master Switch, Houghton 3400, Victron Orion DC - DC, 3000-Watt Renogy Inverter, P.D. 60-amp Converter, Frig Dual Exhaust Fans, Kitchen Drawer Straps.    TV DYI’s:  2 5/16" Anderson System, Timken Bearings, Nitto recon’s, Firestone Rear Air Bags, Bilstein 5100’s, Mud Flaps & Weather Tech all.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • Oliver Staff

Please see post below

 

On-Board Jacks & Jack Points

----------------

Jason D. Essary

OLIVER SERVICE

228 Industrial Ave

Hohenwald, TN 38462

Phone: (888) 526-3978

 

Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm CST

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This email may contain confidential and privileged material for the sole use of the intended recipient(s). Any review, use, distri­bution or disclosure by others is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the sender immediately by email and delete the message and any file attachments from your computer.

Login to Service Portal: https://support.olivertraveltrailers.com/portal/en/home

 

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  • 4 years later...

Granted I’m responding to a very old thread here but would like some clarification on a few things. Just received my Timken bearing set 4 and set 17 and once the weather clears will be installing those. Don’t have the fortune of being able to work on my Oliver inside a garage. 

I’m tempted to just use the onboard jack/stabilizers to lift the wheels on one side at a time, then place jack stands on the frame for additional support. But in the interest of doing this “properly” what is meant and where are these steel plates everyone keeps referring to? Just crawled underneath mine ( #70)  and other than the axles and leaf spring configurations I see nothing that looks like steel plates. There are two L shaped cross members that run from side to side but can’t believe these are strong enough to hold 3000 or so pounds. Raspy pointed out using hydraulic floor jacks under each leaf spring plate but the bolts from those protrude considerably past the plate itself. Somehow this seems like dubious approach. 

As a last point, if the frame itself is susceptible to damage by jacking up from the frame, then how on earth would placing two jack stands for support and security be any different? To my way of thinking I don’t see much difference.

Thanks

Legacy Elite II #70

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On the early Elite II's, such as yours, the steel sub-frame was considerably shorter as compared to later models.

Bill

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2023 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing, Max Payload, 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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You were probably/hopefully out camping when we discussed this again a few weeks ago. Here's  a link. 

 

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2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12

Florida and Western North Carolina, or wherever the truck goes....

400 watts solar. DC compressor fridge. No inverter. 2 x 105 ah agm batteries .  Life is good.


        
 

 

 

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I'm not feeling comfortable with jacking up the forward wheel. Is my positioning in the proper spot? The front is a pretty good bit off the ground. Got the back wheels chalked. Just checking before I continue.

1662031937_ScreenShot2022-05-15at12_17_35PM.png

598312890_ScreenShot2022-05-15at12_22_24PM.png

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George - 

32 minutes ago, geO said:

I also don't like how the bottle jack looks. Does not look safe.

I agree - I would not continue in this manner.

It is good that you chocked the rear wheels - but - I have never lifted an Oliver wheel off the ground without first being hitched to my tow vehicle.  I believe that not only is this a safer way but it also would serve to keep the nose of the Oliver down thus putting all of the jack's force into lifting the Ollie laterally (i.e. getting the wheel off the ground as opposed to the nose in the air).

If for some reason you can not hitch the Ollie to your tow vehicle then I'd place a block of wood (2x4) between that bottle jack and the steel sub-frame.  This would lessen the chance of slippage of the metal against metal while also reducing the distance the bottle jack has to be extended.  But, as I said above, I would not continue in this manner.

Bill

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2023 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing, Max Payload, 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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2 minutes ago, geO said:

It would be nice if Oliver service department would make a video showing the right process of lifting up the Oliver for maint. 

I know that Rodney Lomax and Jason Essary will be at the Rally next week.  I'll mention your suggestion to them - goo idea.

Bill

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2023 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing, Max Payload, 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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Agree with BIll, doesn’t look safe.  If I’m going to raise one side of the trailer I keep it hitched to the truck with the front jack down.  Prevents movement and stabilizes the trailer.  Then I use a stabilizer jack to lift the trailer.  If it’s for a quick task, that’s all I do.  If it’s something more involved or I’m going to be under the trailer I also use a bottle jack, usually on some 2X6 pieces.

I’ve been to discount tire and raised each side, once for new tires and once for metal stems.  Each time I stayed connected to the truck, put the front jack down and used the stabilizer jack.  They were fine with that method.  I’ve done the same at campgrounds for various reasons.  Mike

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Texas Hill Country | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram 2500 6.7L

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Thank you all for your quick replies. I sensed possible danger here and I do like to be safety oriented. For someone like me a video is my best method of instruction. It clears away any doubt in my mind. 

I must also state that you guys on this website are amazing with your level of knowledge!

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Geo, in your photo, it looks like you might be using stacked patio blocks/pavers  to support your jacks? I'd be extremely uncomfortable with that, as well.

I had a bad experience once with a concrete block shattering under the weight of a jack. Never again. We always use wood. Sometimes,  you can't see the hairline cracks, or internal cracking, in those formed concrete blocks.

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2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12

Florida and Western North Carolina, or wherever the truck goes....

400 watts solar. DC compressor fridge. No inverter. 2 x 105 ah agm batteries .  Life is good.


        
 

 

 

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15 minutes ago, SeaDawg said:

Geo, in your photo, it looks like you might be using stacked patio blocks/pavers  to support your jacks? I'd be extremely uncomfortable with that, as well.

I had a bad experience once with a concrete block shattering under the weight of a jack. Never again. We always use wood. Sometimes,  you can't see the hairline cracks, or internal cracking, in those formed concrete blocks.

Just had that happen! Shattered in a bunch on pieces. Off to Home Depot for some wood.

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As everyone has now has discovered, you should NEVER try to lift the trailer from in front of the tires. I tried that once just as George did and by the time I got the rear wheel off the ground, the front jack was at least 18 inches high.

In the picture, if that jack had slipped off the sub frame, the jack stand would have punched up through the bottom of the hull. It might have taken out the right side bottom galley drawer as well.

Best Practice would be to always place jack on the steel sub frame behind the tires. Keep trailer hooked to the truck with parking brake on. If it makes you feel better, chock the opposite side of the trailer. This will lift both tires off the ground and allow you to do your work. I recommend always using a jack stand (or two) under the lifted side. This way, if the jack slips or leaks down the jack stand will catch the weight without everything crashing down and ruining the rest of your day.

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Steve, Tali and our dog Rocky plus our beloved Storm, Maggie, Lucy and Reacher (all waiting at the Rainbow Bridge)

2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, Hull #026 | 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, Hull #050 | 2022 Silverado High Country 3500HD SRW Diesel 4x4 

 

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22 hours ago, ScubaRx said:

As everyone has now has discovered, you should NEVER try to lift the trailer from in front of the tires. I tried that once just as George did and by the time I got the rear wheel off the ground, the front jack was at least 18 inches high.

In the picture, if that jack had slipped off the sub frame, the jack stand would have punched up through the bottom of the hull. It might have taken out the right side bottom galley drawer as well.

Best Practice would be to always place jack on the steel sub frame behind the tires. Keep trailer hooked to the truck with parking brake on. If it makes you feel better, chock the opposite side of the trailer. This will lift both tires off the ground and allow you to do your work. I recommend always using a jack stand (or two) under the lifted side. This way, if the jack slips or leaks down the jack stand will catch the weight without everything crashing down and ruining the rest of your day.

Thanks for this tip Steve. Today while doing the other side I used your method and both tires lifted off the ground easily. This will be my method from now on. 

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