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Tow Vehicle Cargo Carrying Capacity


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When considering a tow vehicle the first number most folks look at is towing capacity. While this is important it's not all there is to it. One needs also to look at the vehicle's cargo carry capacity or payload capacity (CCC/PC). This is all the cargo weight that you can safely add in addition to your truck’s empty weight (also known as curb weight) including passengers.

There are loads of information on the net explaining this and I won't try to duplicate it here. The easiest way to find what your particular vehicle is capable of carrying is to look inside the driver's side door for a yellow and white "tire" sticker. Look at the line that states "The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed..."

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All the information on your vehicle's sticker will different than that of this example. But the stated CCC/PC is exactly correct for your vehicle as it was delivered from the factory.

You have probable added a few items since you acquired your vehicle. Cell phone, charger, sunglasses, GPS, floor mats, hitch and ball mount, you see where this is going. Every ounce and pound comes out of that CCC/PC.

Our Silverado 2500HD has a CCC/PC of over 2100 pounds. Prior to leaving for the Rally, I weighed every item going into the truck. I was over the CCC/PC by 200 pounds, not including the sunglasses and the cell phones.

I am including here actually weights (to the nearest pound) that I recorded of my camping gear that I know many of you carry.

52...Andersen Hitch (I don't use, weight from the net)

40...Clam

5...Yellow Blocks   

19...Zero Gravity Chair (each)

9...Bass Pro Chairs (each)

6...Patio Rug

21...Weber Grill

20...Extendable Ladder (10 foot)

20-40...Ball Mount and Hitch

200-250...Topper

???...Occupants and Pets

600-700...Tongue Weight

???...Tools

40...Extra Propane for grill or fire pit

???...Table

???...everything else you think you can't live without

Add these all up and be prepared to be amazed at how much it all weighs. Just your tongue weight and occupants will probably get half of your CCC/PC. And remember, if you're in an accident and some slick lawyer decides you might have been overweight - and you were, don't be surprised if your insurance company tells you that you are on your own. Pray that you haven't hurt or killed anyone.

 

 

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Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

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Hello,

Hull 806 LE2

I have a question related to TV weight capacity and adjusting the Anderson WDH.

While driving down a rough interstate at ~ 55mph I sometimes felt some slight front bounce on bridge & road expansion joints. Will the WDH help eliminate this as I tighten the chain?

Summary of Specs, CAT weight & tank loads at the scale

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image.png.ac4e42814496530fbb432eb278c59558.png

 

 

 

 

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SteveCr -  “Jounce” control is one thing the Andersen does quite well, the only way to know if it will improve is to try adjusting the nuts. Sometimes just half a turn works wonders. Don’t over do it though, because added chain tension is not good because it causes more wear on the ball and tends to bind up everything when you are maneuvering. It will never completely eliminate motion on nasty roads, that would be a miracle.

At first I was going to comment that the bushings don’t look very compressed, but that may be fine, all Ollie’s are a little different . Use the setting that feels best to you, not the one that the guy in Service thought was adequate…

One thing you can do which will really stabilize the truck is install better tires, those passenger tires are squishy and squirmy. Light truck (D or E rated) tires are better for towing, but you will definitely miss that marshmallow soft ride. They also operate at a slightly higher pressure. When I changed the ones on my 200 the improvement in handling was dramatic, but you sure do feel more bumps…. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.tires-easy.com/blog/p-metric-tires/

BTW I noticed that you are using the weight of fresh water for your black tank estimate, the contents are actually heavier because of the, uhmmmm solids. You’re welcome. 😜

  John Davies

 Spokane WA

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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Ford's towing guide states that a truck towing a trailer with a weight distribution hitch should be adjusted lower the total rise caused by the loaded trailer to 1/2 of the difference between the unloaded and loaded weight of the truck.

 

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I did this with my F150 and the EII and found that loaded/unloaded front wheel well height difference to be 2.5 inches.
I tightened my chains until I brought that difference down to a bit under 1 inch and found that the front steering was better and the bounce was much less.

 

 

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2019 Elite II (Hull 505 - Galway Girl - August 7, 2019 Delivery) 
Tow Vehicle: 2021 F350 King Ranch, FX4, MaxTow Package, 10 Speed, 3.55 Rear Axle
BLOG:  https://4-ever-hitched.com

 

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With the LE2 on the ball and WD attached, the back end lowers a couple of inches...23 1/4 to the top of the BDog.

The front end moves a small amount from 37 4/16 to 37 7/16. I'll measure again after i tow a while.

Below's a pic...tough angle to tell much. I'll keep experimenting with tightening it up in small increments.

At my first dump station experience with this setup the black tank dumped to zero...I thought he grey tank did also...the flow stopped. But I was surprised later when the grey gauge still read 30%. The next campground was full hookup. I saw that the grey would not empty completely at level...raising the nose did the trick. Not a big deal I guess...I just did not anticipate needing to do this at the dump station. I already have a tall block to minimize the jack travel.

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Payload will get most folks well before towing capacity.  My F150 has stated tow capacity of 14000.  I’d never be able to tow that and take anything. Not even sure I would have enough payload for a driver, lol.

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2021 Legacy Elite II Hull #807 - 2021 F150 w/ 3.5L EB and max tow package 

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On 5/30/2021 at 6:47 AM, SteveCr said:

Hello,

Hull 806 LE2

I have a question related to TV weight capacity and adjusting the Anderson WDH.

While driving down a rough interstate at ~ 55mph I sometimes felt some slight front bounce on bridge & road expansion joints. Will the WDH help eliminate this as I tighten the chain?

Summary of Specs, CAT weight & tank loads at the scale

image.png.ba6ff1b38e26bd060f8e074db29ec07b.png

image.png.573567d50d70689ed6e0f9526566ecdc.pngimage.png.562ba7f240c769c3bea256c0dd861380.pngimage.png.fc152df9eb72ce453c2336ab7f35de0e.png

image.png.ac4e42814496530fbb432eb278c59558.png

 

 

 

 

Interesting to see 6 on your Andersen for your F150.   Mine was 3.5 from Oliver after install for my 2021 F150.  Is the 6 your writing or from my Oliver? They did red sharpie in nut and bolt on mine. 

2021 Legacy Elite II Hull #807 - 2021 F150 w/ 3.5L EB and max tow package 

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10 minutes ago, TexasGuy said:

Interesting to see 6 on your Andersen for your F150.   Mine was 3.5 from Oliver after install for my 2021 F150.  Is the 6 your writing or from my Oliver? They did red sharpie in nut and bolt on mine. 

The number depends entirely on where the installer mounted the clamps to the frame rails. Just an inch different would change the "thread count" by about 4. It is just a handy reference, that is all, so you can return to the same setting when you have to loosen them. As long as you don't ever run out of adjustment, having a whole bunch of threads showing is good, because you can loosen up the chains that much more without having the nuts fall off into the dirt. You can shift your mounts forward a bit, if you want this undocumented Anderesen "feature". 😉

John Davies

Spokane WA

 

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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Yep..that's right. I wrote the 6 on nut to create a more visible point of reference. I have tighten it up about 1.5 turns since the factory install. I expected the whale tail to become more difficult to remove but that did not happen.....while following the recent "how to" video method. I'm adjusting to try minimize some front bounce on rough roads...I'm just about there with the adjustment you see in the pic.

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50 minutes ago, SteveCr said:

Yep..that's right. I wrote the 6 on nut to create a more visible point of reference. I have tighten it up about 1.5 turns since the factory install. I expected the whale tail to become more difficult to remove but that did not happen.....while following the recent "how to" video method. I'm adjusting to try minimize some front bounce on rough roads...I'm just about there with the adjustment you see in the pic.

It takes a little time to obtain your correct setting for the Andersen WDH adjustment.  I have been running for the past several years with 8 treads showing and I think for my set up it is the best.  Before I disconnect the Andersen's whale tail I always run the adjusting nut to zero threads showing, that gives additional chain for re-connection at any angle; it only takes a few extra minutes.

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Horace & Dianne

Chesapeake, Virginia

2016 Toyota Tundra Crewmax 4x4 Limited

2015 Oliver Legacy Elite II - Hull # 93

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Concerning the Andersen hitch (or any add on device) there’s no increase in payload capacity. The sticker is all you’ll ever have no matter what you add to the truck. 

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Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

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19 hours ago, TexasGuy said:

Payload will get most folks well before towing capacity. 

This is an accurate statement and one that most people don’t understand. Also, people think that they can load up to the max payload capacity and drive away fat and happy but what they don’t consider is the ride and handling of that vehicle when loaded to the max. 
 

This is a post that I made in a thread about tow vehicles:

Listen to what these folks are telling you about the 3/4 ton pickups. I started towing our Elite 2 with a 1/2 ton Chevrolet gas burner using the Andersen. It was okay but I was only 20 pounds under my max GVWR and a 400 mile day on the road would wear us out. You can make all the weights work out on paper but you can’t get a feeling for how that loaded vehicle is going to ride or perform under the conditions you will experience on the road. I traded up to a 3/4 ton Chevrolet 2500HD with a Duramax Diesel. No worries about exceeding the GVWR and it it pulls and stops the Elite 2 great. Very comfortable ride. My wife enjoys driving it. No need for the Andersen. Uphill, downhill, dry or wet, hot or cold, accelerating onto the Interstate, rough roads, dips or humps at bridges, strong cross or headwinds in wide open areas, pressure waves created by passing semis, avoiding animals in the road, whatever, much better experience. And after a 400 mile day I don’t feel like crap while I’m setting up for the night. But on second thought, go ahead and start out with a 1/2 ton. That way when you do trade up it will make you appreciate the 3/4 ton that much more. 
 

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Bill and Martha

2018 LEII Hull 313

2019 Chevrolet 2500HD Duramax

 

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6 minutes ago, Townesw said:

This is an accurate statement and one that most people don’t understand. Also, people think that they can load up to the max payload capacity and drive away fat and happy but what they don’t consider is the ride and handling of that vehicle when loaded to the max. 

I can vouch for this.  6 years ago I was concerned with towing specs and did not consider payload.  It’s a truck, right?  Throw a bunch of stuff in the back and go.  Once you add the tongue weight, people weight, stuff in the cab and stuff in the bed (including caps or covers) it doesn’t matter how much you can tow if you’re at or over your weight limit.  My 2500 diesel does tow better than my Tacoma did, but it’s the payload capacity that is the big difference.    Mike

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Texas Hill Country | Elite II #135 | Ram 2500 6.7L

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46 minutes ago, Mike and Carol said:

I can vouch for this.  6 years ago I was concerned with towing specs and did not consider payload.  It’s a truck, right?  Throw a bunch of stuff in the back and go.  Once you add the tongue weight, people weight, stuff in the cab and stuff in the bed (including caps or covers) it doesn’t matter how much you can tow if you’re at or over your weight limit.  My 2500 diesel does tow better than my Tacoma did, but it’s the payload capacity that is the big difference.    Mike

Yes - there is a long string of posts indicating same. I can't come close to my payload max - I don't own enough stuff.🤣

Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"
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I never thought I'd ever own an Oliver and last year we bought a 2020 Tundra TRD Sport 4x4 1/2 ton.  I really thought it was overkill for my Casita but since Ive owned three 4th generation V8 4runners , I couldn't bring myself to go back to a V6~5K towing capacity.  The truck performed beautifully on our trip out west with the Casita.  It will remain to be seen how the Oliver does.  The main issue will always be payload now as I'm limited with all of the hardware/suspension that they put on this thing.  Thankfully, I like to travel light.  I can always put the hubby on a diet, right?  

2020 Toyota Tundra TRD Sport 5.7L V8 

2017 Oliver Legacy Elite II  Hull #184 ~ "ILOVHER"

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Your intended travel style is really important for TV consideration IMHO. I really thought about 3/4 Tom diesel but I just didn’t want that for my daily driver yet.  Until I retire I plan to take shorter trips and after almost 2,000 miles on shakedown trip I am very pleased with my TV.  In another 5 years when longer trips and hopefully an extended Alaska trip are on horizon that 3/4 will probably be on my radar.  I also travel light.  I don’t carry bikes or kayaks and normally it is me and a medium size dog.  

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2021 Legacy Elite II Hull #807 - 2021 F150 w/ 3.5L EB and max tow package 

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6 hours ago, TexasGuy said:

Your intended travel style is really important for TV consideration IMHO. I really thought about 3/4 Ton diesel but I just didn’t want that for my daily driver yet.  Until I retire I plan to take shorter trips and after almost 2,000 miles on shakedown trip I am very pleased with my TV.  In another 5 years when longer trips and hopefully an extended Alaska trip are on horizon that 3/4 will probably be on my radar.  I also travel light.  I don’t carry bikes or kayaks and normally it is me and a medium size dog.  

We also use the TV as a daily driver. Right now a 3/4 ton TV is not on the radar for us. Put many thousand miles on a 5.7L Tundra towing Ollie around the lower 48.  It will be interesting to see the new generation 2022 Tundra's cargo carrying capacity, but don't know if it will still be a 1/2 ton pickup, will see.

We travel light with Ollie & TV. Our LE2 (no factory solar system) weighs in at 4940 pounds ready to camp with slightly less than 500 pounds of tongue weight with empty water tanks except for full 6 gallon water heater as per CAT scales last month. Lower tongue weight helps reduce overall weigh of the TV while connected to Ollie, increasing cargo carrying capacity of the TV helping keep TV under maximum cargo, axles, and GVW weights. Used to leave gear in the TV we only used once every year or two, that gear now stays home unless needed for a specific trip.

 

 

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Bill

LE2 #75

 

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