Jump to content

CB Radio's Any still use them


Swamp
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello All,

CB's, a blast from the '70-'80s past, brought communication and entertainment to many folks back in the CW Mcall days.

I was just wondering if anyone of you uses them today. 

 I travel by myself, well, not quite dog in tow, and I just installed a CB in my Ram 1500. Mainly for entertainment purposes. Although informational broadcasts about accidents and road hazards have saved me much wasted travel time sitting in stopped or slow traffic. Not to mention the ever-appreciated "BEAR" call.

 Yes, I know the expletives can fly freely on the "Driver" channel (19), which isn't very family-friendly. But you have 38 more channels to choose from.

What intrigues me is the possible usefulness in a caravan or group travel setting. Their range (over other devices), along with zero cell communication opportunity or (via SSB) in emergency need, is the driving factor in my resurgence in interest.

I also get "that is what cell phones are for"

Share your thoughts

Pat

Joliet, IL

  • Like 1
  • Love 1

Pat (Swamp) from Joliet IL,  2021 Oliver LE II Hull "848" (19K miles to date) , 2020 Ram 1500 5.7 Hemi 3:92 rear end P75 Trans 

"Nowhere to be and all day to get there while looking for a place to happen. Making stops along the way"

 

 

 

Map2-22june.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one, but I never got around to moving it from my old vehicle to my truck.  I had it for a few years in the before times and I think the best use of it was in hearing traffic info from the truckers.  I found though that the range was pretty limited, though that might have been my lack of expertise in choosing and tuning the antenna.  

But when we got the truck, I wanted a pair of handhelds, and ended up going with ham radios (which I converted for MURS channels so that we didn't have to worry about getting licenses).  Those have been so nice that I'd actually forgotten about wanting to install something in the truck.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a CB in our jeep.  Mandatory when we are roaming back roads in our area where log and rock trucks are active.  Most roads have a sign designating the channel to tune to.  There are usually mile markers along the road or on the pavement.  Truckers will announce, over the CB, what mile they are at and whether going in or out. 

I don't know if this is common practice in other areas, but it certainly is in rural Oregon

  • Like 2

Ray and Susan Huff

Elite II Twin "Pearl" - Hull#699; delivered December 7, 2020

2013 F350 6.7l diesel Super Duty 4x4 long bed crew cab

1UP-USA Heavy-duty bike rack

2017 Leisure Travel Van Unity Twin Bed (sold)

AZARCAIDNVNMOKORTNTXUTWAsm.jpg

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been a licensed ham radio since the 7th grade, 54 years ago. The repeater system works well, but I also have a CB mounted in the truck for 2 reasons. Ch 19, the trucker's channel, gives me road information. Ch 9 is the emergency channel used by various volunteer groups to monitor, well, emergencies. REACT monitors ch 9. Range is limited, frequently, depending upon atmospheric conditions. GMRS and FCS are also systems that are available, but every trucker has a cb. Language aside, there is much to be learned about extended road conditions. Other channels have specific purposes. 

So, yes  I use a CB and consider it a communication safety device, albeit sometimes with limited range  

Ham radio gives me something to do while driving. Worldwide communications are regularly possible. It's fun. Something to do at a rainy campsite. 

John

  • Like 2

      

2014 Toyota Tacoma 4x4

2021 Elite I #758       

      image.png.d972b5fc86270818b1e0f030bfaa433a.pngMap of Provinces I Visited

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a portable CB with magnetic roof antenna, I always thought I would use it, but the few times I tried on the highway, I just could not understand what they were talking about..... I should try it on forest roads when loggers are around, sometimes I do worry about meeting one on a blind curve. For road hazards on the highway I will rely on my Garmin traffic alerts, and Waze, when I have a cell signal...

John Davies

Spokane WA

  • Like 1

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/15/2021 at 12:52 PM, Overland said:

 I found though that the range was pretty limited, though that might have been my lack of expertise in choosing and tuning the antenna.  

But when we got the truck, I wanted a pair of handhelds, and ended up going with ham radios (which I converted for MURS channels 

SWR is very important with establishing range for CB or any Radio for that matter. The MURS IMO have a less effective range then the CB and if you couple a 10 Meter export radio converted to a 11 meter tweaked and tuned with SSB reach is quite far.

 

Pat

Pat (Swamp) from Joliet IL,  2021 Oliver LE II Hull "848" (19K miles to date) , 2020 Ram 1500 5.7 Hemi 3:92 rear end P75 Trans 

"Nowhere to be and all day to get there while looking for a place to happen. Making stops along the way"

 

 

 

Map2-22june.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/17/2021 at 12:42 AM, JRK said:

 

So, yes  I use a CB and consider it a communication safety device, albeit sometimes with limited range  

Ham radio gives me something to do while driving. Worldwide communications are regularly possible. It's fun. Something to do at a rainy campsite. 

 

A 10 Meter export radio converted to a 11 meter tweaked and tuned with SSB reach is quite far, and yes it is entertaining and occupies the mind while on the road.

 

Pat

Pat (Swamp) from Joliet IL,  2021 Oliver LE II Hull "848" (19K miles to date) , 2020 Ram 1500 5.7 Hemi 3:92 rear end P75 Trans 

"Nowhere to be and all day to get there while looking for a place to happen. Making stops along the way"

 

 

 

Map2-22june.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators
1 hour ago, BackofBeyond said:

even twice - i don't know what you said 😵

Me, too

  • Haha 1

2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12

Florida and Western North Carolina, or wherever the truck goes....

400 watts solar. Dc compressor fridge. No inverter. 2 x 105 ah agm batteries .  Life is good.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lol. 

Pat, I did (do) have an swr meter to tune the antenna, but I think the problem was not having a proper ground plane.  Just the wrong antenna for the situation I suspect.

I would like to revisit it just because I’m a nerd, but I think I’d rather get a ham license and go that route rather than CB.  Someday maybe. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

simplistically, a proper antenna is one-half wavelength of the radio frequency. CB has an 11 meter wavelength-the radio wave from peak-to-peak is 11 meters. The frequency is how many entire wave cycles are completed per second (a cycle is called a Hertz). Therefore, the antenna should be about 5.5 meters, cut in half. The center of the coax would be connected to one half with the outer braid connected to the other half, each side one-quarter of a wavelength. That is too long and unreasonable for a car, or handheld, so the two halves are electrically shortened. Wherein comes the magmount. The vertical whip is attached to the center conductor of the coax, one-quarter of the antenna. The other quarter of the antenna is the magnet-magmount that is connected to the coaxial braid. The magmount is inductively connected to the metal car body, or whatever is used, creating the so-called ground plane, or other half of the antenna. The inductive connection is usually poor, which creates a poor radiator and even poorer receiver. So to make a car mounted antenna to work better, use a section of copper braid to connect the base of the antenna directly to the metal car body. And use an antenna analyzer to "tune" the antenna to the desired frequency. I almost always have an antenna analyzer in my truck, along with a portable antenna(s). Easy to use. Available for use. 

The Oliver hull makes a terrible groundplane. The bike rack makes a great antenna support. The aluminum frame is a pretty good antenna ground. 

  • Love 1

      

2014 Toyota Tacoma 4x4

2021 Elite I #758       

      image.png.d972b5fc86270818b1e0f030bfaa433a.pngMap of Provinces I Visited

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Update, You can have the best of both worlds, CB and Ham (I believe) with this I upgraded just recently:

 

SR-955HPC – SSB Radio – Never Drift All Over On SSB

·  Frequency Range: 28.000-29.700 MHz & 24.890 – 24.990

 

  •    IF Frequency AM/FM:10.695 MHz 1st IF, 455 kHz 2nd IF SSB: 10.695MHz

·      (PC Programmable)

·      Frequency Bands 1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10 & VFO (11 meter “CB” Conversion band 4)

·      Channel 40 channels (programmable) in each band

     High power 90 watts PEP (with tweak and tune)

It has a scanner as well

With a good antenna this radio which reach

Now I may get my Ham License along with Part 107 Drone certs (photography) This brain may to used up for studying at this stage

Pat (Swamp) from Joliet IL,  2021 Oliver LE II Hull "848" (19K miles to date) , 2020 Ram 1500 5.7 Hemi 3:92 rear end P75 Trans 

"Nowhere to be and all day to get there while looking for a place to happen. Making stops along the way"

 

 

 

Map2-22june.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Will be having permanently mounted HAM radio (trailer as the base station) mobile HAM in vehicle and on person, and mobile CB in vehicle for when useful.  Will be relying on the HAM gear, primarily.  GPS features, family groups with text/picture/location and guidance features, trailer base station as cross channel repeat (trailer as a mini repeater to extend range/horizon), digital modes, and APRS tracking make it too good to pass up for me.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

I have my ham license but have a CB in the truck. Good for car-to-car if traveling with our friends (better range than FRS or MURS) and still good for getting road reports from truckers. Last summer we heard about a highway closure on CB before it was posted anywhere else and were able to take an alternate route before getting caught in the traffic jam.

  • Like 1

Stephanie and Dudley from CT.  2022 LE2, Hull #1150: Eggcelsior.

Tow vehicle: 2016 GMC Sierra 6.0 gas dually 4x4.

Our Oliver journey: Steph and Dud B's RV Screed

Where we've been RVing since 1999:

ALAZCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKYLAMDMAMIMNMSMOMTNENVNHNMNYNCNDOHOKORPASCSDTNTXUTVTVAWAWVWIWYmed.jpg.e6391b9064a3f8f0951751f985664135.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

When on a rolling rally, I've had good success with GMRS radios.  They are inexpensive and readily available for purchase, The distances involved were usually short for the 3 to 8 trailers going down the road.  My truck currently has both long distance and local distance ham radio equipment on it (K2PLM).  I can tune across the spectrum and have a conversation on the radio with someone in another continent or talk with folks in the local area, either directly or through repeater systems.  I also have CB available, as needed.

If I camp off grid, without cell service or broadband out there I can use the ham radio equipment to send and receive emails to my kids / friends so they know I'm still kickin'

  • Like 1

Pete & "Bosker".    TV -  '18 F150 Super-cab Fx4; RV  - "The Wonder Egg";   '08 Elite, Hull Number 014.

 

Travel blog of 1st 10 years' wanderings - http://www.peteandthewonderegg.blogspot.com

 

visited-united-states-map (2).pngvisited-canadian-provinces-map.png

ABBCMBNBNLNSONPEQCSKYTALAKAZARCACOCTFLGAHIIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMAMIMNMSMOMTNENVNHNJNMNYNCNDOHOKORPAPRSCSDTNTXUTVTVAWAWVWIWYsm.jpg

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators
1 hour ago, bugeyedriver said:

If I camp off grid, without cell service or broadband out there I can use the ham radio equipment to send and receive emails to my kids / friends so they know I'm still kickin'

Don't kid yourself - those people are really only interested in the health and welfare of Bosker! 😉

  • Haha 2

2023 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing, Max Payload, 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used CB on the trails in CO, GMRS is becoming the de facto standard as they are easier to use and you can get hand-helds just about anywhere. I am also a licensed amateur (ham) operator and fully endorse getting a license if you plan to use GMRS. The use of the spectrum is gauged by how many people get licensed, not by how many people use it and that spectrum can be auctioned off making the service and all the radios go away.

I mostly use VHF/UHF (2 meter and 70 cm) while mobile but carry an HF and antenna to communicate long-range while camping.

There is an activity in the ham world called POTA (Parks on the Air) where people take radios to state and national parks and monuments and set up radios. Others call in and “log the park”.  This does several things. It gives you a good idea of how far you can talk on your radio, what conditions are like that day and it generates a tremendous amount of interest in radio. The annual Oliver rally is held at a State Park!

Does anyone ever talk radios/communications at the Rally?  Would anyone be interested in a CB/GMRS/FRS/MURS/HAM discussion/demonstration??  I think this would be a great topic. Especially for those looking to caravan up to Canada (different rules) and Alaska.

My Amateur Callsign is AF1US (Air Force 1 United States) - see you on the radio.

Brian

  • Thanks 2
  • Like 1

Brian and Brandelyne

Paris, TN

2020 Ford F-250 Super Duty 7.3L V-8 (Gas), 10 Speed, FX4, Max Tow Package, Firestone Airbags

2023 Oliver Elite II, Twin Bed, Tail # TN 23-1351, Expected Delivery Date 3/08/2023

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

Brian - 

No, as of yet, there have/has never been a presentation of any sort regarding radio/communication at the annual Rally.

I'd suggest either a PM or an email to Matt Duncan in this regard.

Good luck!

Bill

  • Like 2

2023 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing, Max Payload, 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a CB license back in the '70s. That was our equivalent to Facebook or something similar today, and everyone had one. My handle was "Bojangles". 🤷‍♂️ We had a not quite legal base station at my folks house, and mobile units in our cars and even my boat (along with my 8-track player.) Mom talked to people all over the world using "skip", where the signal bounces off of the atmosphere.

I got another CB in 2015 to use in our cross-country travels. (we are in Ohio, and daughter was in college in Seattle.) What a change! Constant foul language, overpowered transmitters that made channels useless for hours. We used two between cars on one trip.

Then I got my GMRS license and a 15W Midland mobile unit and some handhelds. I really haven't used it much other than a couple more cross-country trips. I still relied on the CB for highway information, though. I haven't used either since, as we always travel by ourselves. I haven't even mounted the Midland in the Cruiser I bought almost two years ago.

I've considered HAM, but I don't think I'd get any use out of it. I have a Garmin InReach I can use for emergency communications if I don't have cellular service.

-----
Steve - Northern Ohio, USA
Wandering around on occasion, always lost.
2021 Toyota Land Cruiser - 5X8 Hiker Highway Deluxe Squaredrop Trailer
2023 Oliver Elite II Twin Hull #1360 on order - due March 29, 2023

Facebook - Instagram
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

I used my ham radio antenna which is plugged into my Ollie via an SO 239 connection to talk from my campground at Goliad State Park, Tx (K-3015) to speak with about 20 folks all over the US today.  Fun fun fun

K2PLM

  • Like 1

Pete & "Bosker".    TV -  '18 F150 Super-cab Fx4; RV  - "The Wonder Egg";   '08 Elite, Hull Number 014.

 

Travel blog of 1st 10 years' wanderings - http://www.peteandthewonderegg.blogspot.com

 

visited-united-states-map (2).pngvisited-canadian-provinces-map.png

ABBCMBNBNLNSONPEQCSKYTALAKAZARCACOCTFLGAHIIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMAMIMNMSMOMTNENVNHNJNMNYNCNDOHOKORPAPRSCSDTNTXUTVTVAWAWVWIWYsm.jpg

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/30/2022 at 10:32 AM, Brian and Brandelyne said:

Would anyone be interested in a CB/GMRS/FRS/MURS/HAM discussion/demonstration??  I think this would be a great topic. Especially for those looking to caravan up to Canada (different rules) and Alaska.

 

I would be interested in this topic!  I'm a licensed HAM operator, not currently active (equipment updates needed.)

  • Like 1

Oliver Elite II Twin   Tow Vehicle: Chevy Silverado 2500HD.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/30/2022 at 8:32 PM, bugeyedriver said:

I used my ham radio antenna which is plugged into my Ollie via an SO 239 connection to talk from my campground at Goliad State Park, Tx (K-3015) to speak with about 20 folks all over the US today.  Fun fun fun

K2PLM

Parks on the Air (POTA) is one of our favorite activities.  I got my New Year’s day contacts yesterday and then some!  My wife and I are discussing an “Activation” of the Lake Guntersville State Park (K-1044) during the rally.  I will likely bring my FT-991A and a Chameleon vertical antenna and setup somewhere in the campground but we can discuss options. 

73 de AF1US

Brian

  • Like 1

Brian and Brandelyne

Paris, TN

2020 Ford F-250 Super Duty 7.3L V-8 (Gas), 10 Speed, FX4, Max Tow Package, Firestone Airbags

2023 Oliver Elite II, Twin Bed, Tail # TN 23-1351, Expected Delivery Date 3/08/2023

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/29/2021 at 10:11 AM, Swamp said:

Now I may get my Ham License along with Part 107 Drone certs (photography)

I got my Part 107 license a few years ago. I really enjoyed the study material as I have a background in Air Force aviation and it brought back many memories.  You only really need it IF you are going to use the UAS (unmanned aerial system) to make money e.g. Commercial UAS Pilot License (Part 107).

Otherwise, it’s kind of like having a 2 5/16” hitch, you might not really need it but it has a “cool factor” with it.

Fly Safe,

Brian

Brian and Brandelyne

Paris, TN

2020 Ford F-250 Super Duty 7.3L V-8 (Gas), 10 Speed, FX4, Max Tow Package, Firestone Airbags

2023 Oliver Elite II, Twin Bed, Tail # TN 23-1351, Expected Delivery Date 3/08/2023

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/30/2022 at 10:16 AM, topgun2 said:

No, as of yet, there have/has never been a presentation of any sort regarding radio/communication at the annual Rally.

I'd suggest either a PM or an email to Matt Duncan in this regard.

There just might be something in the works...

BL

Brian and Brandelyne

Paris, TN

2020 Ford F-250 Super Duty 7.3L V-8 (Gas), 10 Speed, FX4, Max Tow Package, Firestone Airbags

2023 Oliver Elite II, Twin Bed, Tail # TN 23-1351, Expected Delivery Date 3/08/2023

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...