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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/29/2018 in all areas

  1. I'm sure Ray meant not offense to anyone here, he, like many here, has a particular way of conveying his thoughts. He is very active on the Airstream forum, which is why I invited him to join ours, when he was discussing Olivers over there. He has lead numerous "adventures" for Airstreamers during which it had been found that, while interested, many were lacking the basic skills needed for any remote adventure that went too far from hookups, which then affected the rest of those involved in the "adventure". While there are more of us who purchased our trailer for this purpose, there are s
    3 points
  2. Thank you Randy. Raspy. This is exactly why I would like to compare trailers. Mike and Carol. Thank you, also. Sorry to say I do not tow my trailer over boulder fields and up to mountain tops for a view at 14,120 feet. That is more for tent campers, and I have done that in Colorado. Not with a trailer in tow. It is the... length... of a trailer that will get you into trouble. I call it the 'bumper drag queen' driving off a Service Station lot, which is most often mistake made by new trailer owners... or crossing a rut in the road and not understand the possible danger
    2 points
  3. I have 2 small 5 x 8 boards. One has a magnet that we put on the microwave. Vibrant colors. It falls off all the time. Bet it would hang on the closet door with a Command Hook. If it was a combo cork and whiteboard you could also clip or pin the campground paperwork to one side. The other is on the pantry for a shopping list. Probably will change out for a small clipboard with one of those small legal pads, so we don't have to recopy..
    2 points
  4. We have a small white board mounted inside the pantry door with On Command strips. It’s good for reminders. I don’t think I’d write anywhere else. Mike
    2 points
  5. I also enjoy camping in remote areas without hookups, but that last photo posted by Overland shows some rocks I'd prefer to avoid! Last October, I visited the factory for some upgrade work. I left late in the day to travel to Rock Island State Park in Tennessee. I was using Google Maps to navigate and I missed a turn. Rather than trying to find a place to turn around and backtrack (I found myself on a very narrow hard-surfaced county road) I decided to keep going anticipating that Google Maps would adjust to my error without causing any difficulties. That was a mistake and marked the begin
    1 point
  6. Another interesting fact is that Land Cruisers go through several owners at first, the first ones tend to lease, and they replace them every one or two years with another new one. They also don’t take them off pavement so they are usually in very nice condition inside and out when the third or fourth owner buys them. By then the value is half the new cost and regular folks who want to utilize their offroad capabilities can do so without panicking about scratches and dents. It takes about five years for the aftermarket to make stuff like body armor available. You don’t see used 200s s
    1 point
  7. Ray, sounds like a fun adventure. We’re currently on BLM land (Dome Rock) near Quartzsite with some other Oliver owners. I’m sure there is a western Oliver owner who has lots of boondocking experience that could go with you. I look forward to hearing how this works out! Mike
    1 point
  8. Imagine your Oliver and our Airstream traveling together in... Wyoming, for instance. No National Park campground. No reservations. Leave whenever you want. No commercial camp host. No neighbors, but those you are traveling with. Camp outside a National Park on BLM open space, for a view that only a few have attempted. Or... just imagine YOU and your Oliver doing what, maybe 80% of trailer owners, do not dare to attempt. I know this is true among Airstream owners, a large percentage would never consider dirt, dust, gravel and unpaved travel as a proper way to travel. It takes one s
    1 point
  9. I'm not sure what photo y'all are looking at that shows our trailer connected to our truck. In the snow photo it's not connected. We did cross the safety chains (had boats for decades) and the Ollie "chains" are PIA wound tight cables that I hope will relax with time, and heat. :) Only photo I could find of tongue setup, although not connected to truck. But, seriously, I do appreciate that you took the time to check. Chris
    1 point
  10. I wouldn't try to write on the wall repeatedly. But I love your idea for a small white board for notes. ......" Why didn't I think of that?....
    1 point
  11. Sherry: Thanks for the 5 year ago warning. Very important to keep in mind. My TV is rated at GVRW 6700, Combined Gross Weight 12,000 pounds. Curb Weight of 5070 with all extras loads it out to no more than 5800. My decked out Elite II will weigh in at 5450 max. Combined with the max weight of the Sequoia loaded out with all gear is 11,250. Just under the 12K max. I will be using an Anderson. Total loads will generally be less as I will travel 95% of the miles pretty much with a dry trailer. G.J.
    1 point
  12. The Oliver and Airstream have a lot in common. The Oliver may have an advantage with the straight axles, versus the Airstream torsion suspension. You would be surprised to see where 28 foot and 30 Airstreams camp. After 12 years of OTG towing Airstreams, I just might know what I am talking about. Twenty three foot and 25 foot Airstreams. The Tandem Axles of an Oliver may make OTG towing some extra clearance and flexible on uneven changes from level to double track road to campsites. If you have not watched a 'torsion axle Airstream' cross a stream bed... you may learn a few things.
    1 point
  13. I hate even signing onto the forum now, seeing all the rally signees and knowing the fun you will have at the event. I cannot attend this year-life will have us in LA at that season. Sure, the family wedding will be remarkable, but I want it all
    1 point
  14. It's this one on Amazon. It was just a bit cheaper than the Carefree version. It slides into the accessory slot along the front of the awning. Seems well made and was a cinch to attach with two people - one person feeding it into the slot and another pulling it through. I'm sure one person could attach without too much effort. My only complaint is that it seems a bit too dark, but of course that's subjective. But I do wish I could have found one in a light grey rather than black. But it does it's job and should help keep wind from getting under the awning as well.
    1 point
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