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  1. My domestic fridge just stopped cooling, no signs of leakage. Everything testing good on the troubleshooting guides. The opinion of the local RV guy was that I had a failed cooling unit. That left me with two options: buy a new unit or replace the cooling unit. After talking to Jason at Oliver and him telling me that to remove the fridge from the trailer you need to remove the door, I thought I would try to replace the cooling unit myself. I found some places that would ship a unit for $500 to $1000 and I do the install. I watched many videos and researched the work. In this research I found several people talking about burping this kind of unit, it entails flipping the unit on its side, top and allowing the ammonia mixture to reposition and displace any air pockets. Since I had to remove the fridge from its housing I thought I would try it...and it worked! We just took a 10 day trip and it worked fine. Some RV techs said it was a wive's tale. Glad I tried it. Hope this might help somebody.
    11 points
  2. I've had Starlink since March. Figured I'd chime in with my experiences - - I've yet to mount the dish permanently (it will end up on the roof using their volcano mount), it's still sitting in our yard on the ground. I just move it to mow. It is heated, so I have no concerns about snow. Indiana isn't exactly Arizona, but it still gets warm here in the summer - no issues with overheating. - Outages are minimal. Had more outages when we first got it - typically ~15-30min/week if I had to guess. There was a single 4hr outage right after we got it. Outages were usually no more than 2 minutes back then, with the rare longer one. For the last several months - I have never noticed an outage in usage. The outage tracking in our app shows about 4 per day, but they're like 2 seconds each. They do sometimes push updates - this is typically around 3-4am, and one or both of the dish or router will reboot/update - this is typically in the 15-20min range. The app is used to control both the dish & router - they've consistently updated it to add functionality over time. I can reboot both the router & dish remotely. It has stats and you can run a speedtest. - The included router is pretty decent. It originally had almost no user controllable features - now it has a few more via updates, but still not very many. It works great though - I've kept the 2.4ghz signal on my cell phone mowing our 5acre yard for example. I've had it in our garage, so it's pretty tolerant of heat as well. The 5ghz signal penetrates to our bedroom - furthest away from the garage you can get, so it doesn't propagate too bad either. You can replace it with your own router if you want. I've so far seen no reason to dig out a more advanced router I have from our last residence. - Speeds are very good. There is some variation. The outer range limits are typically about 50-300Mbps download and 10-35Mbps upload. Ping is typically in the 25-60ms range. I'd say the average is typically in the middle - I almost always hit the 2.4ghz bandwidth limits on the wi-fi (50-80mbs in the house, depending which room), and I'd say 80-120mbs is the typical download range (15-25ish upload). Ping tends to hang closer to 45ms on avg. All of these speeds have improved since we first got it. - We live on a hill in the middle of a field - there are no obstructions close except the house, and I didn't put it close enough for that to be an issue. The app has a few ways to help check for obstructions/monitor for them. Users who have obstructions can still get service - just with some limits due to the arcs - lots of reports in other locations of people with some very tall trees around them - would be worth reading up on those. You still need line of sight to enough of the sky though. Some reports of people who have put it on the top of telephone poles and such. Rain has yet to cause any interruptions - the satellites are only around 250 miles up or so. Snow shouldn't cause issues either, nor should any accumulation (the dish is heated). The service is a game changer in rural areas IMO. My only internet options are cellular and a local WISP. I can see the interstate from my house and a small town - I'm within 20 miles of three different small cities (pop 20k-60k each). I can see two cell towers from my front porch. The cellular - our local towers are not upgraded for any of the Home Internet options, and two of the cell companies are in a position that we can get good high speed service with an exterior antenna, but inside the house (and neighbors not on the hill) service is much slower. Plus, since there is no home internet option, we'd blow through cell data caps instantly. Prior to Starlink we were doing illegal tethering to our cell phones vis usb. Traditional sat internet is just bad. The WISP is pretty decent, but I'd have to put up a 30-40ft tower to get over some treetops to get line-of-sight with some of their equipment. They have speeds slower than Starlink for less, but for $100/mo I'd be getting speeds 1/3rd the speed of Starlink. Plus there is sometimes weather related issues with the microwave dishes. Starlink, at this point, is functionally identical to our old Comcast cable internet in town - the speeds are almost the same. Comcast had a slight edge in latency and price, but even those differences weren't super large. I can't wait to see their mobile options. While nice for RVers, it could also be a game-changer for boats. The technology behind the dishes, satellites, and how they work is pretty amazing. Musk can be controversial, but SpaceX and Starlink are a lifeline to a ton of underserved rural areas & remote workers. I would highly recommend Starlink based on our experience to anyone in similar circumstances.
    8 points
  3. I will wait and see how this completely new Tundra platform performs in its first year before commenting on performance, handling, mpgs, towing. Having owned 3 previous Tundras I will say the reliability of all three trucks I owned was excellent and second to none. Toyota is out front in terms of reliability and dependability at least in my owner experience. Toyota also provided excellent service when any of my previous Tundras needed it. If I were to ever consider another half ton truck, the Tundra would absolutely be given a first look. I have to have reliability, my Tundras have always been very dependable and very reliable for the long haul. Cheers!
    6 points
  4. A quick call to Oliver Service will get you that battery strap. Bill
    5 points
  5. I had a similar thing happen where my pump was sputtering air and water mix and I could see that the filter bowl was only maybe half full. In my case I had taken the pump and filter apart trying to troubleshoot a problem and had inadvertently pinched the gasket in the filter bowl to where it could not seal properly. I was able to unscrew the filter bowl and correct the alignment of the gasket and all was well again. One of many self inflicted gunshot wounds I have caused myself. let me know if you want to talk this through more. Mike
    5 points
  6. This is the best forum that I have ever the pleasure of being a member of! Great people, excellent advice!!!
    4 points
  7. It would depend on what you're looking for, i.e. dispersed, hookups, private, etc. I lean towards no hook ups. Also, the timing of your trip. Many USFS campsites, my favorites, close for the season that time of year, so do your homework. One of my "easy favorites" is Cochiti Lake Campground run by the Corp of Engineers about an hour north of Albuquerque. Used to be open year 'round with some hookups; great showers! Quiet, easy, scenic. But, recent restrictions have made it a bit unpredictable; investigate. Loma Linda Campground, just south of Jemez Springs, NM, an hour north of ABQ, I believe is open year around. Hot springs close. First Come First Served. Joe Skeen CG west of ABQ, at the south end of El Malpias Lava Flow is open year 'round. That's about an hour west below Grants, NM. Very cool scenery. There are KOA's, Casino Campgrounds i.e Isleta, Sandia, Rt. 66, Santa Anna, if you prefer that form of camping/parking. I have never stayed at any of those, but they are close. One surprising unit is Coranado State Park in the town of Bernalillo, NM nothing fancy, but they do have hookups, State Park, relatively quiet, and only 15 mins. north of ABQ. usually packed for Balloon Fiesta. Open year 'round and conveninet. Lot to see in NM. All the best, E
    4 points
  8. The original suspensions on the 2016's is good for 12 to 15 thousand miles. At that point, the "plastic" bushings are shot and there was no way to get any meaningful lubrication into these areas. If you do not tow much this is not the end of the world as we know it (i.e. the suspension will not simply fall apart). However, all of the parts down there will continue to wear (at an accelerated rate) until a bolt or shackle or spring breaks. And, with the suspension getting "sloppier" by the mile, the ride of anything above it will become not so good. This is the same basic suspension on many other RV 's(with the notable exception of Olivers do have shocks on all four corners) but Oliver upgraded in 2017 to a suspension that could be lubricated. Many of us upgraded our older Olivers when these plastic things wore out. Using the "search function" here on the Forum you should be able to find a number of posts on this subject and on how to do the upgrade. Bill
    4 points
  9. I think there has been some question about their capacity rating, so some have upgraded to greater capacity with either larger cables or chains. Each safety cable or chain should be of greater capacity than the weight of the trailer being towed and not the combined total capacity of both cables or chains. I don’t believe Oliver would provide safety cables that were not rated for at least 7000 lbs, but I believe the Texas motto is "bigger is better" or maybe it’s "everything is bigger in Texas", so I do think it a worthwhile upgrade. And I am from Florida, so what do I know. Mossey
    4 points
  10. Share and Enjoy !Shares Photography Tips for Mobile Phone Imagine this, the light is perfectly shining onto the rolling hills defined with woodland vegetation spread across the landscape. As the clouds build to a fluffy white peak in the sky, they nestle your bright sided new Oliver Travel Trailer. With the availability of mobile phones with high quality cameras taking great photos of things you love is possible. Here are a few tips and tricks to help you get better photos while on your travels. With a camera accessible at your finger tips and able to be carried with you at all times, there is not a part of your travels you will forget if you can capture it with a picture. Framing Framing a photo is one of the first things to look at when beginning to take a photo. The term framing comes from what the camera will capture when the film is exposed. Modern camera and phone cameras do not rely on film. In fact, there are a lot of helpful tools that can allow framing to be an easier task. Most modern cameras on a smart phone will display a 3x3 grid. This is an essential tool for good framing of a photo. Apple and Android phones: Setting>Camera> activate “Grid Line” The most common display will be a 3x3 grid, to use this tool properly, place your subject at the intersection points of the horizontal and vertical lines. The human eye naturally is directed to that point on a photo. Lighting One of the most important elements to great photo is light. After almost a year of photographing for Oliver Travel Trailer, I have learned that there is a thin line between too much light and not enough light in some circumstances. The Ollies ultra-bright white gel coat in some lighting situations be frustrating. Too much light and it will over expose your photo and you will be left with a bright egg in the photo. With not enough light the trailer can look dull and grey. A solution for this problem is to reducing the amount of light. Place the sun behind an object (ex. a tree, the trailer, cloud cover, etc.) By dampening the sun’s brightness, it can reduce the reflection from the trailer. To increase the light, you can take the photo with the sun behind you. This will reduce shadows and allow available light to fall onto the trailer making it look brighter. In your phone camera, you can also correct some of these issues. Normally, when taking a photo, it will automatically adjust to the available light you are in. But you can control the camera. After framing up your shot, if you touch the screen, it will focus the camera, and a trick many do not know is that by swiping up or down next to the focus icon you will be able to control the level of exposure in the photo. Zoom with your feet Some photos are best to zoom in, or close the distance to your subject. One of the downfalls for a modern smart phone is the zoom feature is not an authentic zoom. By zooming in on your mobile phone camera, it will enlarge and crop available pixels. This will create distortion and you will lose photo quality. My best advice is to zoom with your feet. The closer to the subject you can get will improve the quality of your images. Be cautious with this tip, pay attention to your surroundings. Digitally zoomed in from far away Closer to subject Your own style No one can be you, or have your own style, or appreciate the beauty you imagine. So, embrace your own style, your own travels, and what inspires you. You do not have to copy others work or creations to be good at taking pictures. Finding inspiration to start a creative process can be important, but feeling like you have to produce the same images can be overwhelming. Take the time to be yourself and live in the moments you are in. Just a few quick tips to pack with you on your next adventure. If you are like me, capturing where your travels take you and sharing them for others to see can be a highlight to the trip. Taking a few extra seconds to look, frame, and adjust a photo before taking it can make all the difference, so be patient and soak in the beautiful vistas that are in front of you. Share and Enjoy !Shares The post Capturing Travels appeared first on Oliver Travel Trailers. Read the Full Article
    4 points
  11. SPRAY NINE is the best cleaner I have found for the streaks. I spray it on and let it set for a few minutes then use a brush with detergent and then power wash just to rinse. https://www.amazon.com/Spray-Nine-26832-Degreaser-Disinfectant/dp/B0014COKYU/ref=asc_df_B0014COKYU/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309748512677&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=8740241489339974550&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9001872&hvtargid=pla-570918661581&psc=1
    4 points
  12. A thorough review of the development of the 2022 Tundra with Toyota's chief engineer who managed the process.
    4 points
  13. A few weeks ago an issue came up on Facebook concerning a customer that wanted to sell their production slot to someone else because some unforeseen situation came up and they wanted to cancel their Oliver order. It was requested to be able to do this so that they would not lose their deposit of $1500. The contract had been signed in December of last year. There was a back and forth discussion on FB with no consensus. I discussed this with Rodney Lomax, and reported back there that it would not be a problem. I got a call from him today and the sales team had examined all the ramifications of doing this and decided that they would not be able to do this now or in the future. The sales staff was in complete agreement that this was NOT a good idea and would only add to their workload while not increasing their compensations. (Personally, I agree with them.) The reasoning is that the deposit is a good faith promise from the customer to the company that they will buy the trailer. I have included the first paragraph of the contract that is being signed by new customers. It explains the circumstances under which deposits will be forfeited. Even though the deposit money is eventually applied to the cost of the trailer, it is used immediately to be able to fund the sales team's commissions and the costs of advertising. If the the whole process were to be started over, the sales member would be spending an equal amount of time with the second customer with no compensation. Another issue is the new customer is essentially breaking in line before existing customers who have been waiting their turn. As we all know, sales are booming in the RV industry and the Oliver team is working very hard to give us the very best trailer on the market. They are doing a Great Job! Let's all thank them for all that they do. Bold italics are mine... TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE 1. Offer, Governing Provision, and Cancellation: This writing constitutes an offer to purchase by the party designated as Buyer, identified above, to purchase the products described herein in accordance with the following terms and conditions. This writing is not an acceptance by Oliver Travel Trailer Sales, Inc. (hereinafter “Oliver”) of any offer made and acceptance by Oliver of this offer made by Buyer is expressly conditioned upon Oliver’s signature below and Buyer’s assent to these terms and conditions. Buyer will be deemed to have assented to these terms and conditions when Buyer signs and delivers this purchase order form, along with an initial deposit of $2,500.00 to Oliver. Buyer will be given a seven-day (7-day) grace period to cancel the order and receive a full refund. Cancellation after the seventh day will result in a cancellation fee of $1,500.00 being retained by Oliver, the cancellation fee will be deducted from the amount of the deposit returned to the Buyer. A separate cancellation fee, as detailed below, will be applied if the Buyer cancels the order after forty-five days prior to the production start date.
    3 points
  14. Everyone, I received an email from Winegard indicating the availability of a new firmware version following an announcement in August. It is purported to improve the web user interface and enhance the SkyPro functionality. As many of you know, the WiFiRanger has limited use for most of us who don't have seasonal campsites at campgrounds that offer sufficient bandwidth to support potential users. I will be installing the update and will update this thread with my thoughts about the web user interface and any significant changes I discover.
    3 points
  15. John, I've got a National Luna in my truck, too, and power it with a small AGM battery, which is charged from the truck while driving and also pair of solar panels attached to a rack. With that setup, I've never depleted the battery while traveling. I used a Victron Cyrix smart relay to prevent the fridge from draining the starter battery, and just allow the truck's electronics to act as the regulator for charging the house battery. And I've got a Victron BMV to monitor everything via bluetooth. It's been a good setup and made the fridge something we don't really think about. I've got a DC fridge in the trailer, but now that I've had experience with the NL in the truck, I'd keep the absorption fridge if doing it again. It's just a big drain on the trailer batteries that I wouldn't have to worry about. Propane for us seems to last forever.
    3 points
  16. Scubarx brought up an important point on the Norcold. I, too, advise owners to manually select the power source each time. The older dometics didn't ever default to dc. The norcold will, if left in auto, and can leave some with depleted batteries unknowingly. There are a few areas where you must turn off propane tanks, not just the fridge. Many ferries require it, and some check and tag the bottle at boarding. Some tunnels, either because they're heavily trafficked, or don't have the typical little rise in the center. They're usually clearly marked, and have an alternative route, or have a pullout area to turn off tanks. Most can be avoided with planning, and if not, it's just a minor inconvenience.
    3 points
  17. The auto function fridges in the newer trailers operate differently from our older Dometic units. They will select from all three available power sources, be careful it at it doesn’t select DC. Ninety per cent of all RVers run their fridges on propane while traveling. We driven >150K miles like this and I don’t ever recall a situation where we were required to turn it off.
    3 points
  18. I can't believe that right after I read your post, the next day I get a call from the manager of the place where I store my Oliver 2018 Elite II that there is some kind of alarm going off in my trailer. When I went by to take a look, sure enough it was the propane/carbon monoxide sensor. The date on the back of the sensor was January 25, 2015. This post probably saved me a bunch of time. I just took the old one out and ordered a new one. Thanks!
    3 points
  19. Like Bill, I upgraded my trailer to the Dexter after about 18 months. The old bushings were totally worn out. It’s something to check if you are buying an older used trailer. The Dexter is easy to spot. Mike
    3 points
  20. I installed this security camera several months ago and posted it on the forum. The camera is working very well there are no wires at all the camera recharges by built in solar or USB port. Clear picture and great night time visual. I posted it under entry door security camera. This system is used as a back up camera I’m not sure if the monitor will pick it up from the TV we use the monitor in side the Ollie I purchased the system at Walmart for around $100.00
    3 points
  21. Well, I found the source of of the water pump noise. I think it's this part: https://www.amazon.com/SHURFLO-94-800-02-Water-Drive-Assembly/dp/B00UYWVB0C/ref=sr_1_18?dchild=1&keywords=shurflo+4008+parts&qid=1632405066&sr=8-18
    3 points
  22. Spotted in Marin County, CA at the China Camp campground in the camp host spot.
    3 points
  23. Yep, continued fussing with it and found the exact same thing. I went through several tries of purging with city water and then trying the pump again, and when that didn't work realized that the filter was bubbling: air getting in! Took off the filter cap and, just like you, saw that the gasket was not seated properly. Reseated the gasket, and viola, it works again! Thank you so much for the reply -- had I not found it your comments would have steered me to the right spot. And yes, a self-inflicted wound; I had removed the filter to clean it earlier today. I'm amazed that after 3 1/2 months of use the filter continues to collect substantial amounts of plastic shrapnel.
    3 points
  24. Thanks to all who offered advice. Most of you seem to agree that a cheap 12-volt battery, properly connected, would suffice for the short term--getting us home. Mike at Oliver, however, did not agree, saying that we would drain the battery to uselessness within an hour or so. As I wrote earlier, he told me the best temporary solution was to tape up the ends of the cables and secure them until I could get new high-grade batteries. I decided that I wanted to upgrade to the Battle Born lithiums, thinking I might find someone along the route home from whom I could purchase the batteries and who could install them with the needed components. That turned out to be a fruitless search, as those I contacted either could not get the batteries or were scheduled way into the future with other repair jobs. My solution was to order the batteries and needed components-- BBGC2 Battle Born 100Ah GC2, PD4045LICSV Progressive Dynamics Replacements 4000 Series 45 Amp Lithium Converter, and BAM030712000 Victron BMV-712 Battery Monitor--from Battle Born. If their shipping promise holds true, I will receive them after we return home. I have contacted my local RV repair shop in Sierra Vista, AZ, and they assured me that they have the ability to install the batteries and components, having done so before with a couple of other rigs. The downside is that they too are swamped, and will not be able to do the work until the beginning of December. In the meantime--since we are committed to staying in Escalante, UT till Tuesday, performing in the festival here--I have made an appointment with a mechanic for Tuesday at what seems to be the only auto repair shop for many a mile, who says he will try to install that cheap battery to help us get home. (I understand that we will have to be very conservative with our power consumption on that trip, hoping that Mike from Oliver might not have had it exactly right.) Despite all of the worry, hassle, and time, I am looking forward to eventually having an upgraded solar/battery system. I received the sale price on the batteries and a reduced price on the components. Folks who said Battle Born had good customer service seem to be correct. Thanks again for everyone's help.
    3 points
  25. Leaving (Burlington area) Vermont this morning, headed to NH. Working our way up to Maine.
    3 points
  26. Well here it is. It will be interesting to see how the the new Tundra refresh fairs through its first year.
    3 points
  27. Styling changes don't come readily to Toyota products. I, as most, drive them in spite of their Toyota-signature styling. The more important attraction is the long road ahead with no CELs visible. Rather than concentrating on appearance changes, my hope would be for a payload that is more insync with the tow rating.
    3 points
  28. i think that a 22 tundra and a 22 ollie would be a good running hardware for the next 10yrs...should make an interesting retirement.?
    3 points
  29. We’ve also stayed at Cedar Creek COE campground. It is only W/E, but has a dump station. It’s open through the end of October. We enjoyed our stay there. It is close to the Opry and an easy drive into down town.
    3 points
  30. John, Replaced Ollie's battery tray with Oliver's latest tray about 6 months ago, took a few measurements of the old (2015) and new tray. New tray on right: Old 2015 tray: I only use one Battle Born 100AH lithium battery with a 100W solar suitcase with plenty of room for other stuff in the tray:
    3 points
  31. @Mcbcan you share why you are dissatisfied with the Tundra electronic brake controller? I have a 2020 and I am very pleased with the brake controller. I am curious to know what issues you may have had with it. There are a number of features on the 2022 model that I would be happy to have, provided they have been vetted and all work well. However, I just can't get past the new body styling. I just don't care for it. I don't like the huge touch screen either. I do appreciate the comfort and safety features of modern trucks, but I often miss the days of old when trucks were just trucks. I wouldn't want to tow with an old truck, but sometimes I really miss my 69 Chevy short-bed. No frills metal dash, spartan gauges, bench seats, oak plank bed, chains on the tailgate... oh, I can almost smell it (sigh).
    3 points
  32. im going all in on the 2022...hope i can get one before the trailer is finished dec8...!!???
    3 points
  33. Yes it will, hopefully better than their first go around with electric brake controllers… It’ll be fun watching as things unfold, being longtime Tundra owners and fans.. We will be looking for a new TV in 2022 or 23, and it seems like there are some pretty good choices out there for 1/2 ton trucks. It’s the cargo capacity that is going to be a big factor this time around, and 1940 lbs would be great… but I suspect that applies to the 2x4 models, not the 4x4….probably not the crew cab either. I do look forward to giving one a test drive… maybe giving that new fangled back up system a try in a crowded parking lot full of brand spanking new trucks🙂 We will be looking hard at 3/4 ton trucks this time around…
    3 points
  34. BTW, I see that Battleborn have their standard 100Ah battery on sale for $799 right now, which is the best price I've seen since I bought mine in '17.
    3 points
  35. The tray that Oliver uses is the MorRyde SP60-042 Utility Tray, inside dimensions 14" x 21" x 2.75". There's 12.75" clear from the floor of the tray to the bottom of the aluminum catch for the lock. The Battleborn 270Ah batteries are 21.3" x 11.6" x 10", so I don't see how you'd fit even one without removing the tray. Three of their standard 100Ah batteries will fit easily, and four will fit tightly; i.e., it will take some work to wire them up.
    3 points
  36. Couldn't they have designed a more intimidating grill??
    3 points
  37. This is Dexter's recommendation: Lithium complex grease, NLGI No. 2 such as Mobil Oil Company Mobilgrease HP or equivalent. It's easy to find an equivalent.
    3 points
  38. While we would love to have more of you join us we cannot take another trailer or guest and manage the events in a way that accommodates everyone comfortably. We will do this again next October. Foy & Mirna Sperring
    3 points
  39. So, here's an update. Tried the furnace today and realized no air coming from the vent below the sink. A quick investigation found that the duct was not connected to the furnace. The knock-out hole on the rear side of the furnace was knocked out, and that's where the hot air was coming out. No one in the factory connected it. Since I picked it up in mid-July, here are the other problems I've had. No caulking around kitchen sink, allowing water to seep underneath and drip to drawers below. Put duct tape around sink for quick fix. Need to put silicone around it. Screen door misaligned, with big gaps allowing bugs to get in. Jason suggested tweaking it to try to close the gaps. Haven't tried yet. Lettering on light switch panel rubbed off. Mike sent out new panel. Lettering on Dometic stove knobs rubbing off. Waiting for new knobs. Xantrex inverter shutting off and not rebooting due to improper programming from the factory. This resulted in a new Technical Service Bulletin (Aug. 3), and after Jason helped me change the settings, the problem hasn't returned. In another post I shared an article about the horrible (really horrible) quality of SOB RVs and the nightmares those owners are having. In that post I promised not to complain about anything related to my Oliver, and I'm trying. I guess my point here is to remind new buyers to do a super thorough check of the trailer before leaving OTT. I spent two and a half hours at OTT before leaving and thought I did a thorough check but I missed some things. For example I turned on the AC because I wanted to make sure it really could run off the lithium system, but I didn't turn on the furnace. I will say that I'm very happy with the trailer and all the components. The composting toilet is easy peasy. The lithium pro package works great. The Norcold fridge is big and cold. The suspension takes rough roads like a champ. The KTT bed is super comfy. The windows seal tight. Yesterday and today I gave it it's first wash and wax, by hand. What a job. My arms are sore! But, with a little elbow grease I got all the bugs off and with the marine wax got the hull shining.
    3 points
  40. Can I jump in here and ask for a point of clarification? When this topic comes up it seems everyone talks about cell booster and wifi booster and I think the wifi booster gets only one aspect of it covered. The aspect everyone talks about is the ability to "boost" an existing wifi signal (aka the campgrounds wifi). However, my understanding is that the "wifi booster" is actually the Cradlepoint Wireless WAN which is much more then just connecting to the campgrounds wifi. True, it can connect to the campground wifi boosting it and then using the connected router to seamlessly provide an internet connection to all your devices. However, for me the real power comes in the ability to use the same cradle point WAN endpoint to pull connections from wireless networks (AT&T, Verizon, etc). It is unclear in the Ollies add-on package what type of Cradlepoint router comes with the install. I think this is where most people's comments of "using our phones as a hot spot" comes in. True, they play the same role assuming your phone can get a strong connection inside your Ollie. If it cannot people have mentioned this is where they just connect a MiMo antenna attached to the window to something like their Jetpack. Our Technomadia friends have a great run down on all this. This works as well. However, my understanding of where the Cradlepoint Wireless WAN can be really powerful is 1) The omni-directional antenna mounted on the outside of the Ollie allowing for strong cell reception (less interference and stronger antenna then your cell phone alone). 2) The ability to have dual sims with cradlepoint so it can stream your connection through whatever provider has the strongest connection and doing all this without requiring you to change the Wifi endpoint your device(s) are connected to. Am I over stating what that add-on provides? Like I said their specs are not clear on what the actual hardware is that comes with that add-on so not clear if it is the version that allows dual SIMs. Even with a single SIM though the idea of an externally mounted strong omni-directional antenna for a cell single connection is a win over just using your cell phone. Good thread here. I think there are fair arguments about the cost versus waiting for something like Starlink to be viable or the complexity of this for the avg. person or the subscription cost. All fair topics. But I think talking about the "wifi booster" as just a way to "boost" the campground wifi is really understating what it is.
    3 points
  41. I don't know if they will do a modification like this, but have you reached out to Oliver service? Maybe they would consider it and might be a good opportunity for them to discover how quiet the Houghton/RecPro units really are!
    3 points
  42. I'm with WolfDDS on cooking outside. I love to cook on our Weber 2200 and we can cook entire meals on the grill. In the morning: pancakes, eggs, bacon, english muffins all on the grill and then lunch and dinner: grilled vegetables, steaks, burgers, dogs, marinated chicken thighs, etc. My better half will do the veggie prep inside and I'll get everything ready outside. Our outdoor food prep station is a folding table and we have dialed in the utensils, condiments and everything else we need into a container or basket so we're not making too many trips in and out. If the weather is lousy, we'll have chicken salad or tuna salad or something that's easy. Cereal in the morning with fresh fruit. I want to get to a point where I can cook entire meals on the fire like SeaDawg has mentioned in other threads. Recently bought a bunch of cast iron for both our grill and the campfire from Lodge. I really enjoy cooking with cast iron. My wife is an excellent cook and we have a nice kitchen in our home. That said, she has never mentioned to me that the working space inside the trailer is inadequate. We eat very well, but simply, when camping. Love to buy fresh, local produce and good quality meats when traveling and we'll also pack some vacuum sealed foods as well. Good luck with your purchase!
    3 points
  43. The answer to your questions depends on how your wife perceives meal prep when camping. Does she have visions of "like at home" meal prep or is she willing to make concessions? That being said, at home I am an avid cook/baker. Our kitchen is spacious and outfitted with all the "necessary" tools that make meal prep and baking easier and more enjoyable. It would be disconcerting, to me, if I were to compare it to the Oliver kitchen. I am happy to shift my mind-set, when camping, and have found the smaller Oliver galley to be well organized, as efficient as prior larger RV kitchens (such as our 5th wheel), and an improvement over the like sized galley in our Leisure Travel Van. One trick I employ: We have a wooden bread board (a recycled pull-out board from my HS Home Ec Dept). My husband installed rubber feet on the bottom so it fits snuggly over the stove top. We actually made this for previous RVs and were able to reposition the feet to fit the Oliver. It protects it glass top of the stove, when not in use, extending counter space. When using the stove, I place the board on the bed next to the galley and use it to set things out of the way, until needed (if that makes sense). I also use the small counters (pantry and microwave cabinet areas) extensively during meal prep; the dinette table, not so much. We do not have the microwave, but rather carry a small toaster oven for cooking. I use the nightstand for it. Regarding meal prep outdoors: I do very little outside. I like being in the kitchen, where everything is handy and I don't have to carry a lot in and out of the trailer. Also, at certain times of the year, bees/yellowjackets/hornets can be very annoying when preparing food, and eating too, outdoors. Cooking outdoors is too much like tent camping; we have a great indoor kitchen and choose to use it. When downsizing from a larger RV (30ft 5th-wheel) I quickly learned a valuable lesson: in the smaller space, it is important for everything to have a place and keep things put away. This makes any task more manageable and reduces stress. I pack things so items oft used are easy to get to (without having to empty the contents of a cabinet/drawer to get them. We utilize the tow vehicle to store items not often needed to conserve interior storage. Just a few ideas . . . . . hope this helps.
    3 points
  44. Search the forum for Cradlepoint and research it in other places online for information about them. I believe Overland mentioned that there is a subscription fee as well. Also take a look at YouTube for "Mobile Internet Resource Center". They are former Oliver owners who live mobile year round and know all about mobile connectivity. Good luck, Mossey
    2 points
  45. Sorry I did not close this thread out. I finally added the Andersen to the trailer. The RAM 1500 did have a liability statement in the manual for 5,000 lbs or more. It also took care of the porpoising that was occurring on rougher back roads and bridges. Well, not really bad bridges, but it's better. It was very easy to install. I did get the suggested chain extensions. I used 24 links, not 23 (just in case I needed it). Must have a good torque wrench and some muscles, and/or a friend. Thanks all.
    2 points
  46. Sure.. I had a 2011 Tundra which I put an after market brake controller in, as at the time Tundras didn’t come with them. The 2016 Tundra which I currently drive came with the stock version, I believe it was the first or second year Tundras were equipped with them. The problem with it was it was very inconsistent, sometimes it worked, most times not. It was a common, well documented issue. I was able to get mine fixed a couple of years ago, by a service guy at a Toyota place that owned a Tundra and knew what the issue was. Not sure what he did but It’s worked fine since.
    2 points
  47. I have seen a lot of negative comments about the front end of the new Tunda. It seems a lot like comments on the Fiberglass RV forums about how sterile the inside of an Oliver looks to some people. The good news is that I will not have to look at it as I'm driving a late model GM, Ford, Dodge, Nissan or Toyota truck in the future. Mossey a Toyota owner for the last 20 years
    2 points
  48. Hey Jeff, glad you and Liz found the issue before something bad happened. We had the same issue, our four AGM batteries were also in bad shape. The hold down straps had worn holes in a couple of them and one was visibly swollen, two were leaking. I replaced all four with two Battle Born lithium batteries, their basic model at 100aH each. We’ve been on several trips since then (January) and so far the two batteries have been plenty, even when we’ve been out with no hook ups for long periods. If you call Battle Born they will work with you and give good advice/guidance. You probably will have to replace a board in the fuse panel underneath the dinette. Battle Born has those also. I had a fellow Oliver owner and general smart technical guy help me with the replacement and cleaning up the cabling. Here’s a link to the thread I started in January - LINK. It has a lot of information, maybe too much. Keep us posted on your progress/solution. We’re going to be at Kartchner Caverns in January, maybe we can drive down to Sierra Vista for a coffee or something. Mike
    2 points
  49. 1. Yes, and yes it is! 2. I've had good luck using a magic eraser pad. You can also minimize the streaks by sealing the light gaskets with Captain Tolleys.
    2 points
  50. Another way to clean out this area on the water heater and the fridge is to use a can of compressed air - I always have one onboard. Bill
    2 points
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