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CB Radio's Any still use them


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Hello All,

CB's, a blast from the '70-'80s past, brought communication and entertainment to many folks back in the CW Mcall days.

I was just wondering if anyone of you uses them today. 

 I travel by myself, well, not quite dog in tow, and I just installed a CB in my Ram 1500. Mainly for entertainment purposes. Although informational broadcasts about accidents and road hazards have saved me much wasted travel time sitting in stopped or slow traffic. Not to mention the ever-appreciated "BEAR" call.

 Yes, I know the expletives can fly freely on the "Driver" channel (19), which isn't very family-friendly. But you have 38 more channels to choose from.

What intrigues me is the possible usefulness in a caravan or group travel setting. Their range (over other devices), along with zero cell communication opportunity or (via SSB) in emergency need, is the driving factor in my resurgence in interest.

I also get "that is what cell phones are for"

Share your thoughts

Pat

Joliet, IL

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Pat Joliet IL, and my dog Phoebe, Oliver LE II Hull "848", 2020 Ram 1500 5.7 Hemi 3:92 rear end P75 Trans 

"Nowhere to be and all day to get there while looking for a place to happen. Making stops along the way"

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I have one, but I never got around to moving it from my old vehicle to my truck.  I had it for a few years in the before times and I think the best use of it was in hearing traffic info from the truckers.  I found though that the range was pretty limited, though that might have been my lack of expertise in choosing and tuning the antenna.  

But when we got the truck, I wanted a pair of handhelds, and ended up going with ham radios (which I converted for MURS channels so that we didn't have to worry about getting licenses).  Those have been so nice that I'd actually forgotten about wanting to install something in the truck.

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We have a CB in our jeep.  Mandatory when we are roaming back roads in our area where log and rock trucks are active.  Most roads have a sign designating the channel to tune to.  There are usually mile markers along the road or on the pavement.  Truckers will announce, over the CB, what mile they are at and whether going in or out. 

I don't know if this is common practice in other areas, but it certainly is in rural Oregon

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Ray and Susan Huff

Elite II Twin "Pearl" - Hull#699; delivered December 7, 2020

2013 F350 6.7l diesel Super Duty 4x4 long bed crew cab

1UP-USA Heavy-duty bike rack

2017 Leisure Travel Van Unity Twin Bed (sold)

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I have been a licensed ham radio since the 7th grade, 54 years ago. The repeater system works well, but I also have a CB mounted in the truck for 2 reasons. Ch 19, the trucker's channel, gives me road information. Ch 9 is the emergency channel used by various volunteer groups to monitor, well, emergencies. REACT monitors ch 9. Range is limited, frequently, depending upon atmospheric conditions. GMRS and FCS are also systems that are available, but every trucker has a cb. Language aside, there is much to be learned about extended road conditions. Other channels have specific purposes. 

So, yes  I use a CB and consider it a communication safety device, albeit sometimes with limited range  

Ham radio gives me something to do while driving. Worldwide communications are regularly possible. It's fun. Something to do at a rainy campsite. 

John

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2014 Toyota Tacoma 4x4

2021 Elite I #758       

      image.png.d972b5fc86270818b1e0f030bfaa433a.pngMap of Provinces I Visited

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I have a portable CB with magnetic roof antenna, I always thought I would use it, but the few times I tried on the highway, I just could not understand what they were talking about..... I should try it on forest roads when loggers are around, sometimes I do worry about meeting one on a blind curve. For road hazards on the highway I will rely on my Garmin traffic alerts, and Waze, when I have a cell signal...

John Davies

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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On 4/15/2021 at 12:52 PM, Overland said:

 I found though that the range was pretty limited, though that might have been my lack of expertise in choosing and tuning the antenna.  

But when we got the truck, I wanted a pair of handhelds, and ended up going with ham radios (which I converted for MURS channels 

SWR is very important with establishing range for CB or any Radio for that matter. The MURS IMO have a less effective range then the CB and if you couple a 10 Meter export radio converted to a 11 meter tweaked and tuned with SSB reach is quite far.

 

Pat

Pat Joliet IL, and my dog Phoebe, Oliver LE II Hull "848", 2020 Ram 1500 5.7 Hemi 3:92 rear end P75 Trans 

"Nowhere to be and all day to get there while looking for a place to happen. Making stops along the way"

COKSMIMONDSDTNWIsm.jpg.8d2c8fe2cafb2e65ca9e6e18d52a5980.jpg

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On 4/17/2021 at 12:42 AM, JRK said:

 

So, yes  I use a CB and consider it a communication safety device, albeit sometimes with limited range  

Ham radio gives me something to do while driving. Worldwide communications are regularly possible. It's fun. Something to do at a rainy campsite. 

 

A 10 Meter export radio converted to a 11 meter tweaked and tuned with SSB reach is quite far, and yes it is entertaining and occupies the mind while on the road.

 

Pat

Pat Joliet IL, and my dog Phoebe, Oliver LE II Hull "848", 2020 Ram 1500 5.7 Hemi 3:92 rear end P75 Trans 

"Nowhere to be and all day to get there while looking for a place to happen. Making stops along the way"

COKSMIMONDSDTNWIsm.jpg.8d2c8fe2cafb2e65ca9e6e18d52a5980.jpg

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even twice - i don't know what you said 😵

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Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"
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Lol. 

Pat, I did (do) have an swr meter to tune the antenna, but I think the problem was not having a proper ground plane.  Just the wrong antenna for the situation I suspect.

I would like to revisit it just because I’m a nerd, but I think I’d rather get a ham license and go that route rather than CB.  Someday maybe. 

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simplistically, a proper antenna is one-half wavelength of the radio frequency. CB has an 11 meter wavelength-the radio wave from peak-to-peak is 11 meters. The frequency is how many entire wave cycles are completed per second (a cycle is called a Hertz). Therefore, the antenna should be about 5.5 meters, cut in half. The center of the coax would be connected to one half with the outer braid connected to the other half, each side one-quarter of a wavelength. That is too long and unreasonable for a car, or handheld, so the two halves are electrically shortened. Wherein comes the magmount. The vertical whip is attached to the center conductor of the coax, one-quarter of the antenna. The other quarter of the antenna is the magnet-magmount that is connected to the coaxial braid. The magmount is inductively connected to the metal car body, or whatever is used, creating the so-called ground plane, or other half of the antenna. The inductive connection is usually poor, which creates a poor radiator and even poorer receiver. So to make a car mounted antenna to work better, use a section of copper braid to connect the base of the antenna directly to the metal car body. And use an antenna analyzer to "tune" the antenna to the desired frequency. I almost always have an antenna analyzer in my truck, along with a portable antenna(s). Easy to use. Available for use. 

The Oliver hull makes a terrible groundplane. The bike rack makes a great antenna support. The aluminum frame is a pretty good antenna ground. 

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2014 Toyota Tacoma 4x4

2021 Elite I #758       

      image.png.d972b5fc86270818b1e0f030bfaa433a.pngMap of Provinces I Visited

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Update, You can have the best of both worlds, CB and Ham (I believe) with this I upgraded just recently:

 

SR-955HPC – SSB Radio – Never Drift All Over On SSB

·  Frequency Range: 28.000-29.700 MHz & 24.890 – 24.990

 

  •    IF Frequency AM/FM:10.695 MHz 1st IF, 455 kHz 2nd IF SSB: 10.695MHz

·      (PC Programmable)

·      Frequency Bands 1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10 & VFO (11 meter “CB” Conversion band 4)

·      Channel 40 channels (programmable) in each band

     High power 90 watts PEP (with tweak and tune)

It has a scanner as well

With a good antenna this radio which reach

Now I may get my Ham License along with Part 107 Drone certs (photography) This brain may to used up for studying at this stage

Pat Joliet IL, and my dog Phoebe, Oliver LE II Hull "848", 2020 Ram 1500 5.7 Hemi 3:92 rear end P75 Trans 

"Nowhere to be and all day to get there while looking for a place to happen. Making stops along the way"

COKSMIMONDSDTNWIsm.jpg.8d2c8fe2cafb2e65ca9e6e18d52a5980.jpg

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Will be having permanently mounted HAM radio (trailer as the base station) mobile HAM in vehicle and on person, and mobile CB in vehicle for when useful.  Will be relying on the HAM gear, primarily.  GPS features, family groups with text/picture/location and guidance features, trailer base station as cross channel repeat (trailer as a mini repeater to extend range/horizon), digital modes, and APRS tracking make it too good to pass up for me.

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