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Electric Brakes?


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Yes, your tow vehicle must have a trailer brake controller and the 7 pin connector near the hitch receiver to connect to the trailer brake/electrical/light system.  

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2019 Oliver Legacy Elite II - Hull #461

Tow Vehicles:

Primary - 2019 Ford F-250 SuperCab 4x4, 6.2L Flex-Fuel engine 

Backup - 2019 Nissan Armada 

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Most trucks sold today with trailering option will have the hitch (2"), trailer brake module, and will all be adjustable on the dash of truck from the factory with this option. Our new Ram only requirement is to push the trailering option switch on the dash and the computer does the rest, if not mistaken I did have to set the trailer brakes one time on the first pull and I think Oliver did that upon delivery.  Note this option from the factory will reset the transmission and engine speeds for trailer pulling, it does all the work for you, no manual shifting required. 

trainman

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Elite II, Twin Bed, Hull #489, 2019 RAM 1500, 5.7 Hemi, 4X4, Crew Cab, 5'7" bed, Towing Package, 3.92 Gears.

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The brake brandishing process is new to me. Does the process described in owners manual need to be done prior to towing the trailer how or can it be done as part of normal use?

BRAKING AND BURNISHING BRAKES

The electric braking system will need to be burnished-in according to the manufacturer’s instructions in order to obtain optimal performance. This will allow the brake shoes and magnets to slightly wear into the drum surfaces.1. To burnish-in the brakes on your travel trailer, you will need to apply the brakes 20 to 30 times with approximately a 20 mile per hour decrease in speed between braking.2. Allow ample time for the brakes to cool between applications

 
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2022 Oliver Elite II Hull#1047 "Saunter"

2014 VW Touareg TDI

 

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Actually, you are probably familiar with this "process" if you have ever bought a new car, truck or motorcycle.  You are cautioned to drive "carefully" for the first 500 miles or so - try to not apply too much pressure to the brakes (i.e. stop too hard) or "drag" the brakes by keeping your foot on the brake pedal for too long.  Basically - drive it like you're breaking it in versus driving it like you stole it.😇

This "process" allows the brake shoes to conform themselves to the brake drum.  This same process happens with disk brakes but disk brakes are not quite as sensitive to this process.

Bill

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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On 2/20/2022 at 8:48 AM, Trainman said:

Most trucks sold today with trailering option will have the hitch (2"), trailer brake module, and will all be adjustable on the dash of truck from the factory with this option. Our new Ram only requirement is to push the trailering option switch on the dash and the computer does the rest, if not mistaken I did have to set the trailer brakes one time on the first pull and I think Oliver did that upon delivery.  Note this option from the factory will reset the transmission and engine speeds for trailer pulling, it does all the work for you, no manual shifting required. 

trainman

If you have an older TV (2010 GMC 1500 Sierra w/tow pkg) you bought new or used like us, you want to make sure that you have a functioning "Trailer Brake" mechanism, either from the factory or an add-on usually near the Steering column.  Our TV owner's manual implied that we had one and there was even a section on how to engage and adjust it, but I could not locate it in the dash area, I thought it was maybe hidden, so I BLINDLY thought we had one. 

Later I became painfully aware that just because you have TT Brake lights does not mean that your TT Brakes are engaging

Along the Blue Ridge Pkwy and coming down one of those grades and finally being able to pull over at a pull-out with the “Blue Smoke” rolling out of the rear TV wheels, I knew something was not right, but I thought it was because I did not gear down for the decent.   What was strange to me was, the OTT brakes were not hot or smoking...

Later we were able to locate a FANTASTIC Automotive repair shop (Weibert's Auto Place, 720 Creek Ln, Youngstown, NY 14174)They are friendly, fair, fast & did not take financial advantage of a couple on Vacation...  On the initial visit I whipped out my 7-pin tester and showed them I had current running back to my TT Brake Lights so I should have brakes, right?  They in-turn popped the hood, had a look around inside and they were able to diagnose the issue.  My words not theirs “Your wiring for your Trailer Braking is stilled rolled up and covered in plastic because your vehicle does not have a factory installed or aftermarket Trailer Brake mechanism to connect the wires to".

They added an aftermarket trailer braking system the Steering column.  They also repaired / replaced (my words, their action) parts for the rear brakes" on the TV and showed me how to adjust the sensitivity of the TV braking for the TT.  

From that point on, stopping distances were greatly reduced and the trip no longer had any "E-Ticket rides" or caused any broken fingernails. 

Bryan, Out

 

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Maggie & Bryan | Arnegard, ND | 2020 LE II (Twins) Hull #665 | 2021 RAM 2500 6.4L HEMI Gasser | 4dr | 6.5' bed

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I would like to mention one important aspect of electric trailer brakes….. as the driver YOU are responsible for making sure they are working and are set correctly, You, not the Oliver tech that adjusted your hitch, or some guy on the Internet who told you to set the controller to some arbitrary number….. The trailer brake performance varies dramatically between the time they are brand new and not seated, and when they are working at maximum effectiveness. You should drive at about 15 or 20 mph on a loose surface and adjust the gain (the current or voltage, depending on what your unit shows) so that when you fully operate the manual lever with your finger, the tires just barely skid. That will get you close to the right setting, then adjust a little up or down as needed until the trailer “feels right”. That takes some time and experience, once you get it right the trailer should share the work but not drag or jerk the TV. There are also other adjustments, Tekonsha calls theirs “Boost”, that affect how quickly or aggressively the brakes are operated, try some different settings to see what happens. 

So, bottom line, play around with all the adjustments and try to find the sweet spot. A rain slick surface or gravel will require you to back off on the gain, or the tires will skid. Remember to bump the power back up when you get back onto dry pavement. And at least once daily on a long trip, check your trailer brake drums for overheating, they should be warm after a steep descent, but not skin blistering hot. Or stone cold, that indicates they aren’t working. And all two or four should be reasonably close to each other. If one brake is doing all the work, it will burn up. If the temperatures aren’t fairly similar, you should have a tech check them out ASAP to figure out why….. maybe you have a bearing that is failing and running hot. It’s better to discover that in a well lit, heated garage that by the side of some deserted back road in foul weather.

Learn to routinely observe your trailer tires in the TV side mirrors when turning and slowing, for example, maneuvering in a big parking lot,  that will teach you a lot about how the brakes are working. 

John Davies

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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JD, I TOTALLY agree,

All this was on ME and me alone, looking back at it, we are fortunate that we made it without any accidents.

B, Out

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Maggie & Bryan | Arnegard, ND | 2020 LE II (Twins) Hull #665 | 2021 RAM 2500 6.4L HEMI Gasser | 4dr | 6.5' bed

ALARILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMAMIMNMSMONENHNYNCND

 

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Your big truck helped keep you out of trouble, but whew! glad everything was ok, and you found a good shop. 

That's not always easy to do, on the road. 

I would also add, super kind of you to add this information.  Lots of new folks don't know, and don't have your big truck. Thank you.

2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12

 

 

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2 hours ago, John E Davies said:

check your trailer brake drums for overheating,

I've been supposing that my tire pressure monitor system that displays the tire temperature would detect overheating of the brake drums. Is my assumption correct or should I reassess?

Onward through the Fog!


EarthPicks of Cochise County


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3 minutes ago, Spike said:

I've been supposing that my tire pressure monitor system that displays the tire temperature would detect overheating of the brake drums. Is my assumption correct or should I reassess?

Your sensor reads the wheel temp, near the outside. If a tire deflates that pressure will drop rapidly and it will alert you in time. A hot hub or drum is located far away from that sensor, so maybe you would see a slight rise in temperature, but there is so much metal in between that it would take a long time to heat up the sensor. The TPMS is mainly helpful to see if one tire has gone flat, or if all of them are overheating because the pressure is set too low,  but I would not count on one for brake or hub problems. Your fingers or a temp gun is way more precise.

John Davies

Spokane WA

 

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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On 2/22/2022 at 1:37 PM, John E Davies said:

TPMS is mainly helpful to see if one tire has gone flat, or if all of them are overheating because the pressure is set too low,

MODERATOR:  Both JD's and this post are certainly safety related and important, but are off topic.  Your call as to move them to another thread. 

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The above is another one of Mr. Davies' "Diamond Grade" memorable statements.  This time two concepts in one sentence!  The pearl of course is reminding all trailer draggers  about the #1 cause for trailer tire failure.  Below I have cut an pasted his, and mine, #1 cause.  The entire article is a good read if you have time as he discusses the other two of the top three causes:  Mechanical Issues and Road Hazards.  These three issues cause 99% of all trailer tire failures.   So for today, I'm just addressing the #1 reason - Under-inflation.      

https://www.tires-easy.com/blog/top-causes-of-tire-failure/

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#1 – Causes of Tire Failure: Under-inflation

One of the main causes of tire failure is under-inflation. Tires that are under-inflated flex more in the sidewall. Excessive flexing causes them to heat up far beyond normal operating temperatures. This problem is compounded when driving at highway speeds during hot weather for long periods of time. When the tire gets excessively hot, the rubber begins to degrade, which if driven on long enough, leads to a rupture in the sidewall of the tire, or tread separation. The result is an immediate and rapid loss of air pressure, often accompanied by a loud bang as the tire explodes.

Causes of Tire Failure

UNDER-INFLATED TIRES

In addition to the sidewall splitting, the inner liner will usually have evidence that the tire was run at low air pressure before it exploded. When the tire has been removed from the wheel, look for small chunks of burnt looking rubber and dust that has come off the inner liner. If your tire looks like this, it is likely that tire manufacturers, and most extended tire warranty programs, will deny any claim for credit or free replacement.   

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Many of the "Ole Salts"  (Myself Included:  Kindly note that I did not use the "Old" word!) recommend having a TPMS, an electronic temperature meter and a tire pressure gauge.  These topics have been well addressed and are searchable.  (Shameless Plug:)  If you don't have these, you may want to look up JD's articles about great recommendations.  I personally use those that he recommended, and am happy I did.   There are also many other recommendations as well here on our forum.

Off roaders benefit from lowering TP when going off road.  This is done primarily to reduce punctures and soften the ride.  In our case, during our 3 or 4 month full time all over the western US, we at least once a week have to increase/decrease tire pressures as we toggle between high speed and off-road conditions.     

Lowering the pressure is easy with a tire gauge that has a screw on chuck and a button to deflate the tire pressure.  The royal PITA is having to find an air compressor to take the pressure back up to high speed pressure.  I tried several different "toy" air compressors and most did not last a month, let alone a season.  On recommendation from a friend, I tried out his 20V DeWalt air compressor.   With a 5 AH 20V battery and a case it is ideal for what we use it for.  I also carry a DeWalt cordless drill that uses the same battery.  For me, this compressor is a safety and convenience device.    

 

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Tug:  2019 F-150 SuperCrew Lariat, 3.5L EcoBoost, Max Trailer Tow, FX-4, 4X4, Rear Locker

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On 2/22/2022 at 6:22 PM, Spike said:

I've been supposing that my tire pressure monitor system that displays the tire temperature would detect overheating of the brake drums. Is my assumption correct or should I reassess?

We had a catastrophic brake failure on one wheel of our fifth wheel. A spring broke and part of the auto adjust mechanism fell inside the drum, leading to further parts thrashing around inside the drum as we drove. My first indication was unusually high temperature in that tire, reported by my TPMS.

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Stephanie and Dudley from CT.  2022 LE2, Hull #1150: Eggcelsior.

Tow vehicle: 2016 GMC Sierra 6.0 gas dually 4x4.

Our Oliver journey: Steph and Dud B's RV Screed

Where we've been RVing since 1999:

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On 2/22/2022 at 4:19 PM, SeaDawg said:

super kind of you to add this information.  Lots of new folks don't know

I'll repeat what SeaDawg said -- THANK you for posting this. It's all new to me! 

Oliver Elite II Twin   Tow Vehicle: Chevy Silverado 2500HD.

 

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On 2/27/2022 at 6:58 AM, Steph and Dud B said:

We had a catastrophic brake failure on one wheel of our fifth wheel. A spring broke and part of the auto adjust mechanism fell inside the drum, leading to further parts thrashing around inside the drum as we drove. My first indication was unusually high temperature in that tire, reported by my TPMS.

We need pictures. Did you say a lot of bad words, and how much was the repair?

Thanks.

John Davies

Spokane WA

 

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags, Safari snorkel.

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1 hour ago, John E Davies said:

Did you say a lot of bad words, and how much was the repair?

Thanks.

I have photos somewhere, but not handy. We were actually almost to our exit when I saw the high temp. Was able to limp a couple of miles to our destination campground. The trailer was still under warrantee and the manufacturer agreed to pay for a mobile service tech to come out and do the work, so it didn't even impact our vacation much. He came out, pulled the wheel, ordered parts, and came back a couple of days later with everything down to the spindle including bearings, backing plate, and drum. Didn't cost us a dime. I have to give credit to Rockwood/Forest River RV for quickly honoring our warrantee claim and Coach-Net for quickly finding a mobile tech for us. The root cause was a defective spring in the Dexter brake assembly and we weren't the only ones that had that problem around that time (2017).

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Stephanie and Dudley from CT.  2022 LE2, Hull #1150: Eggcelsior.

Tow vehicle: 2016 GMC Sierra 6.0 gas dually 4x4.

Our Oliver journey: Steph and Dud B's RV Screed

Where we've been RVing since 1999:

ALAZCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKYLAMDMAMIMNMSMOMTNENVNHNMNYNCNDOHOKORPASCSDTNTXUTVTVAWAWVWIWYmed.jpg.e6391b9064a3f8f0951751f985664135.jpg

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