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Nan

Hooking up an Oliver

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??? Have you ever pulled a trailer? Are you looking for how to do everything including maneuvering, or do you need specific info about connecting to an Ollie?

 

What is your tow vehicle and which trailer will you get? Will you have an Andersen hitch?

 

We can help but you need to tell us more.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA


"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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I have never pulled anything.  I hope to be buying an Oliver II and have been reading all of the posts about a TV.  I have not bought one yet because again, I do not know anything about a TV.  I do know that I am a small woman and at 72 years old maybe all of this is a dream and I should just find a rocking chair.  About the Anderson hitch..I read that you said it was a PITA, so do not think I want to go that route. But, thank you for answering.

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Towing a trailer takes a certain amount of aptitude and skill, you can learn but you will need instruction and some time. If you will be travelling alone, you should perhaps be thinking about a different approach, like a Class B RV. Driving a smaller van based self contained motorhome is dead easy. You still need to learn how to operate all the systems and appliances, but you won’t have to deal with hitching, unhitching, and solo maneuvering. Backing a trailer by yourself in darkness or inclement weather can be traumatic.

 

The Olivers are great trailers but you need to make sure one is right for you. Do you know anyone with a truck and small trailer who would be willing to give you some lessons in a big parking lot?

 

If I were by myself I would either have the smaller Ollie or a pickup truck camper. The bigger Oliver is definitely more of a handful sometimes.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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Nan, I had no experience, had never hooked up a trailer. This forum is an amazing resource, and there were a bunch of YouTube videos that helped. I did lots or research while I was waiting for the trailer to be built.

 

The people at Oliver showed me how to hook up the trailer. It is something one person can do alone. Anita gave me a great suggestion to videotape parts of the orientation that I might want to refer to later. Good advice, as we later had trouble getting the thermostat to work right. The manual did not help, but the video did.

 

There are a lot of solo travelers on this forum, both men and women, with both Elites and Elite IIs.  Of course it is harder to back a trailer alone. One can try to get pull through campsites. There is very little that a small person cannot deal with in trailering, except perhaps accessing the rooftop from a ladder, and I can’t think of anything that really requires considerable physical strength. Reasonable manual dexterity is required to hook up to the tow vehicle, and to connect the hoses and cables.

 

maybe all of this is a dream

 

Go for it! Camping in an Oliver is a dream.

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David Stillman, Salt Lake City, Utah

2016 Oliver Elite II  Hull 164    |    2017 Audi Q7 tow vehicle. 

Travel and Photography Blog: http://davidstravels.net

 

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Nan,

 

Hooking up a trailer is a learned experience, like many other things, and not to be feared.  Should you select an Elite in lieu of an Elite II, the Anderson hitch is not even needed.  Most modern tow vehicles have integrated back-up cameras that can assist you in getting very close to your hitch ball.  Over my years of travels, I've encountered numerous single women with small trailers who do very well with the mechanics of dealing with a trailer.

 

As has been said, there are you tube videos, various devices to help, and most campers are more than glad to come to the aid of a newbie in a campground.  Baby steps . . . you will be fine.

 

My single axle Legacy Elite has almost 130,000 miles on it and I have found it very commodious for my needs, as a single traveler.  I'm sure you would too.

 

Pete

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Pete & "Bosker".    TV -  '18 F150 Super-cab Fx4; RV  - "The Wonder Egg";   '08 Elite, Hull Number 014.


Travel blog of 1st 10 years' wanderings - http://www.peteandthewonderegg.blogspot.com


ABBCMBNBNLNSONPEQCSKYTALAKAZARCACOCTFLGAHIIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMAMIMNMSMOMTNENVNHNJNMNYNCNDOHOKORPAPRSCSDTNTXUTVTVAWAWVWIWYsm.jpg

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Thanks everyone.  The reason I have my eyes on the larger Oliver is because I have two Galgos.  One is 45# and the other is 55# and I think I would need the space for the three of us. I plan on going to Tennessee soon.

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Nan,

 

I find your situation uplifting. To know that your out of your comfort zone, yet prepare to go there in spite of your inexperience, well, I applaud you. To let you in on a secret - even those of us with years of experience, have an issue or two, every so often. Sometimes in our comfort zone, we don't pay enough attention, and make less than stellar choices. It happens. So, as you state, its a something that can be learned by almost anyone with an aptitude to take on the new. It is not a question of strength, or age, its understanding what to do, and doing it properly. Simple as Pie. You haven't mentioned your choice of TV, that is important. With the right one, a WD hitch system will not be needed, and thus hitching is simplified. Actual towing - will be a little simpler also.

 

I plan on going to Tennessee soon.

 

If you have the time, when you get to TN, look me up, I'll help you in any way I can. I'm pretty sure with a little hands  on, you'll quickly be competent enough to hitch anything- and move on to more pressing issues. (don't worry, I'm not a axe murderer, my wife sees to that) ;-)

 

I wish you well

 

RB


Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"

ALAZARCACOFLIDMTNVNMOKORTNTXUTWAWYd56201524964bac5483378b34b491562080842sm.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Nan -

 

Ever thought about renting an RV for a few days?  Certainly it would be a way for you to "test the waters" without the financial commitment.  I'm not aware of anyone or place that would rent an Oliver.  But, at least you would be able to get an idea of both the reality of your dream and most of what is required of you to reach that dream.

 

Bill


2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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I agree with all the comments, but I do want to caution that towing without a human partner requires constant extra awareness. I often ask my wife to hop out with her phone or a portable radio to guide me, check for hidden obstructions or walk up an unknown single lane road, to make sure there is room to turn around, if nothing else.

 

I have been doing some solo camping with “Mouse” and enjoy it a lot, but the dynamics are VERY different. You always need to watch out for situations where you might not be able to just drive out easily. You must become very comfortable with backing, so that when the moment comes that you get “trapped” by an unexpected dead end road, closed gate, or blockage (like a double parked car in a parking lot or narrow street) you will be able to reverse out without panic or trauma. I have mistakenly entered a tight urban parking lot only to find that I did not have enough room to make the next turn. Embarrassing! The rear camera is a must have option.

 

Do not rely on always being able to find a pull-through site, especially out West where in many parks, National Monuments and National Forests back-ins are the only option. I see a pull-through as a treat - how convenient! - but I never count on getting one. Here is Deception Pass State Park in western WA. It is a stunning place to visit but daunting with a trailer!

 

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I stick by my opinion that a small self contained motorhome or truck camper makes a lot more sense for a solo traveler. It makes these concerns moot.

 

John Davies

 

Spokane WA

  • Thanks 2

"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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. Embarrassing!

No doubt that's how I have felt a few times, jumping out, running back to make sure there is room, or what not.  But it beats really screwing up!

 

As for going it alone - If that was the case - I would be using the Sprinter/Transit Vans I converted into a stealth RV - perfect for one, tight for two - but Oh so easy to go almost wherever one wanted.  But I do love the amenities of our Oliver.

 

RB


Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

2018 Oliver Legacy Elite II - 2018 GMC 2500 Duramax 

"Die young - As late as possible"

ALAZARCACOFLIDMTNVNMOKORTNTXUTWAWYd56201524964bac5483378b34b491562080842sm.jpg

 

 

 

 

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My trailer backup strategy is simple - back extremely slow and check mirrors often. That way, if something goes wrong, damage is likely to be minimal.  Some like to back quick and forceful, I guess as a demonstration of skill and confidence.  Not me, even though my wife is sometimes embarrassed by my turtle pace, and traffic must wait for me to complete maneuvers, this is how I roll.

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KWR


2019 Oliver Legacy Elite II, Hull#444


2019 GMC Sierra 2500HD Crew Cab, 4WD, Denali, Duramax 6.6L Turbo Diesel V8 Engine with Allison 6-speed transmission

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Nan, don’t be intimidated about hooking up or towing either Oliver, with an appropriate vehicle they both pull extremely well.

 

As far as those people that say you can’t or shouldn’t do it by yourself, that’s their opinion. I’m a retired professional truck driver, when I first started in the 70’s women drivers were very rare, now they are pretty common, the point is, with practice and patience almost anyone can do it.

 

On the topic of backing up by yourself, next time you pass a big class 8 truck, look up at their mirror, if you see the word “g.o.a.l.” On their mirror it means “get out and look”, sage advice.

 

Steve


STEVEnBETTY

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Nan, don’t let the naysayers scare you away from your dream of owning an Oliver. There are many thousands of solo travelers out there right this minute happily pulling their trailers all over the Western Hemisphere. Most of them are women. Many of them of a certain age. I know quite a few of them and, to a person, they do not want to stop traveling.

 

You can do this. We all had to learn to back up. Some folks are better than others, but it’s not gender specific. You don’t need someone to scout the road ahead on foot unless you plan to go down it. And, you could do it yourself if that is your plan.

 

Remember this, most of us here will give you all the help and support needed for you to happily and successfully own an Oliver Travel Trailer. Most of the places you go will have a good Samaritin that will do the same. Get out there and “live the dream.”


Steve, Tali and the dogs: Reacher, Lucy and Rocky plus our beloved Storm and Maggie (both waiting at the Rainbow Bridge) 2008 Legacy Elite I - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0026 2014 Legacy Elite II - Outlaw Oliver, HULL NUMBER: 0050 2017 Silverado High Country 2500HD Diesel 4x4 

 

      ALAKAZARCACOCTDEFLGAIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMA       ABBCMBNSYTsm.jpg

 

 

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Just a thought.... you could always rent a trailer from u-haul and drive around with it for a day. Do it on a day that a factory has a big open parking lot and try parking between the lines. Also know that your Oliver will probably have the back camera system so it will be even easier. Even with the camera and some experience, I still get out and look. Sometimes many times.  You can do this...

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Nan, you can do this. I had done no serious towing before picking up our Ollie. Hooking up with and Andersen hitch is not difficult once you know how to do it. Jason or one of the Oliver folks can give detailed instructions when you pick up. Backing is a learned skill, but the hand on the bottom of the steering wheel and going SLOW is the best advice. We just had a tight back in site at a state park near Phoenix this week and with the help of my neighbor across we got in on the first attempt. Mike


Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram Rebel 4X4 5.7L Hemi

ALAZARCACOFLGAIDILKSKYLAMDMSMOMTNENVNMNYNCNDOHOKSCSDTNTXUTVAWVWYsm.jpg

 

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Nan, Check out http://supersizelife.com

 

Debbie writes an insightful and soul-bearing blog about selling her home & fulfilling her dream of traveling fulltime in her Oliver. She is a sweetheart. Reach out to her. Make that dream happen!

 

Also, I would love to see a photo of your dogs! :)

 

Chris


Chris & Duke Chadwell
🐾Maddie & Baxter🐾
Elite II Hull 292
2017 F-150 Lariat 3.5 EB 4x4 Lakeland, FL 

 

2019TravelMap.jpg

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Nan, going to put my two cents in.  I am a woman in my mid 60's.  The past two years I towed a 1200 pound modified tear drop.  About three weeks ago I took possession of my Elite.  I have towed the Elite to the DMV for inspection, parked it in an RV lot after 6 inches of snow has fallen, and most recently moved it into indoor storage.  The first week I had it I took it over to a church parking lot (during the day mid-week ) and practiced backing it up,  pulling it around,  parking it between parking lines, and took if off the Anderson Sway bar for about an hour.  Once you get the confidence it is not that hard!  Just be patient, take it slow,  and don't be intimidated!  If you have a friend that has some time and can go with you to help you during this learning curve, that will also help you get used to towing.

 

 

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cmdmon286-

 

The Oliver camper family is so proud of you!  You asked questions, you listened, you practiced, apparently you are learning and you are gaining confidence.  It appears to me that you are a virtual guidebook as to how to attack so many "issues" concerning RV's.  Thanks for being here>

 

Bill

 

p.s.  Keep your guard up - it is when we get rushed and/or complacent that bad things happen.

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2017 Ford F150 Lariat 3.5EB FX4 Max Towing 2016 Oliver Elite II - Hull #117 "Twist"

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I think for you the best thing you can do is find someone who is pulling travels today and can help you with instruction on how to do things the correct and proper way. I do find that at the Casita Rallies that there are always people there to help new owners on backing, setups, and just things you need to know. I would never suggest that you just start off down the road form the dealer and learn as you go, too many factors involved here. I myself have been towing trailers of all types for over 55 years and even today things arise that need to be given some thought before going on, that is making the wrong decision can be very costly and even dangerous to you and others. I don't know if there are classes on RV towing, but there should be from what I've seen some people doing with there trailers. I feel you can do it, just get the proper training from someone who knows.

 

 

 

trainman

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Elite II, Twin Bed, Hull #489, 2019 RAM 1500, 5.7 Hemi, 4X4, Crew Cab, 5'7" bed, Towing Package, 3.92 Gears.

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