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Oliver EliteII vs Airstream


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About a year ago we started looking a trailer trailers. It became obvious that the wood framed trailers are pretty much junk. If I buy something I want it to last many years. This is why I started looking at Airstreams. Air streams are not with out their flaws, but they are not junk.

I happened across an add for Oliver a month ago, and the thought that it was interesting. I really like the 23-25 twin beed setup of Airstream and I saw Oliver had a similar setup with the 23ft.

I have done a few searches, but have had problems gathering the info. I am sure some thread has already covered this in depth, but haven’t found it. I have some questions:

What are the pros/cons of Oliver vs Airstream? (I know a broad subject.)

I was wondering about the durability of the shell and the ability to get the shell repaired?  Also Major vs minor repairs to shell?

Airstream has guards all around the front end to protect the alumiinim body and glass.  Any problems with the Oliver in this aspect?

What is the the longevity of Oliver?  (20year old Airstream is still young)

Does the shell degrade with longterm exposure to the environment, ie weather, UV,...?

Does the shell have seems that need to be sealed, if so how often?

People put lift kits on the Airstreams because they sit soo low, Does Oliver need this or is a lift kit available?

The Airstream has steel frames that are prone to rust if care is not taken with them.  I Oliver use aluminum which can corrode and can be prone to repetitive stress fractures.  Are there any precautions/worries that you need to worry about with the frame of the Oliver?

I know this is a bunch of questions. Sorry.

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I don't have definitive answers for you, but just want to say, we were in the same position a couple of months ago when we decided to sell our 25 ft class B+ Leisure Travel Van.  We decided not having a way to explore in remote areas was to restrictive and we didn't want to tow another vehicle.  Also the additional cost to maintain and insure a vehicle that sits most of the winter because it isn't 4-season.  Well, enough of that, here's why we decided on Oliver.

Having owned a couple of wood framed, entry level trailers, we know how poorly they are built,besides being a big step down from a high quality motor home.  So, Airstream was the first thing we looked at.  Found out, real quick, AS just isn't made as well as we thought.  Yes, we liked the twin floor plan.  But after hearing tales of cabinets falling off the wall, high maintenance exteriors, and the fact that they are mass produced for a market that demands luxury over quality, we decided to look at other options.  

Durability and function are more important to us than all the "bells and whistles" and "like home amenities".   Not sure how we stumbled onto Oliver, but once we watched the factory tour video, we were very interested.  

After contacting Oliver, we were set up to meet an Oliver in person, since we are 26 hours away from Hohenwald, TN.   I suggest you do this before deciding between the two.  A nice couple from Central Oregon met us and welcomed us, amid the pandemic, to tour their Oliver twin bed.  We had pretty much decided it was a good choice, but wanted to make sure it "fit" our needs.  Ironically, this couple had considered an Airstream.  When they went to the dealership, with the intent to purchase, low and behold, as the salesperson was showing the trailer, the oven fell out of the wall!  Not my idea of a $100,000 RV and certainly shows how little the dealers care about their product.  Oliver cares.

I also like that with Oliver, you have a choice on a lot of features that other brands install as standard, whether you want them or not.  Less motorized accessories to maintain/malfunction.  We don't watch TV while traveling . . . . . so we don't have to have the big TV antenna on the roof.  Our microwave gets used very little when we camp . . . . . we can delete the microwave and have a large storage cabinet instead.  Don't like swirly graphics? . . . . . you can order your Oliver in a plain white wrapper, or choose the color(s) for their more subdued swooshes.  And the integrated fiberglass cabinets are not going to fall off the wall!  Sure, there is always going to be something that needs attention, but buying directly from the manufacturer problems are well taken care of.  Oliver has pride in their product that the mass produced market cannot match.

My suggestion for you would be to contact an Oliver agent.  He or she will be more that happy to answer your questions.  If you are anywhere near the plant, schedule a tour.  

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Ray and Susan Huff

Elite II Twin Hull# 699 - delivery December 7, 2020

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, 2008RN said:

You’ve asked a lot of questions and you will get some good answers, I’m sure.  I’ll give some brief thoughts since I’ve only got about 10 minutes right now - more later.

 

What are the pros/cons of Oliver vs Airstream? (I know a broad subject.)

Answers to this one might be subjective... Oliver is a small company, family owned and family run.  We know the owners, have camped with them.  It’s a small company and they care about their customers.  You can tour the factory and meet the folks that build your trailer.  The service department is outstanding, I email or text the service manager (Jason) with an issue and I get a reply quickly.  Very responsive.

 

I was wondering about the durability of the shell and the ability to get the shell repaired?  Also Major vs minor repairs to shell?

The shell is very durable, quality stuff.  Oliver was doing fiberglass long before they built any trailers.  Any fiberglass repair shop can do repairs, minor or major.

 

Airstream has guards all around the front end to protect the alumiinim body and glass.  Any problems with the Oliver in this aspect?

We’ve got about 60K miles on our almost 5 year old trailer.  I do have a handful of minor nicks on the front of the trailer, noticeable only if you get close to look.  Some have put on temporary guards to travel to Alaska.  One long time owner had the truck bed coating type of protection added to the front of his trailer.  Normal roads are no problem.

 

What is the the longevity of Oliver?  (20year old Airstream is still young)

The first Olivers were built in 2008.  They are still on the road.  In fact Hull Number 03 was just sold to a third owner.  Two of our moderators are camping in their 2008 trailers and I suspect they will be around for quite a long time.

 

Does the shell degrade with longterm exposure to the environment, ie weather, UV,...?

With basic maintenance (wash wax) the hull stays shiny new.  When I tell folks my trailer is 5 years old they are surprised and remark that it looks new.  You’ll get this answer from Oliver owners, just do routine maintenance and it will look like new.  I haven’t seen a degraded hull yet.

 

Does the shell have seems that need to be sealed, if so how often?

There is a seam around the middle where the upper and lower shells are joined.  The upper overlaps the lower.  I’ve not heard of anyone every having to do anything to it.

 

People put lift kits on the Airstreams because they sit soo low, Does Oliver need this or is a lift kit available?

The Oliver suspension is not low like the AS.  There is always discussion about how to make it more of an off-road trailer, but for the regular owner the suspension is fine as is.

 

The Airstream has steel frames that are prone to rust if care is not taken with them.  I Oliver use aluminum which can corrode and can be prone to repetitive stress fractures.  Are there any precautions/worries that you need to worry about with the frame of the Oliver?

Oliver hand builds their aluminum frame in the factory. Durable and not prone to the same types of problems on steel frames.

 

I know this is a bunch of questions. Sorry.

No need to be sorry.  There are lots of owners here who are happy to help.  You haven’t said where you live, but if you can a factory tour is well worth the time.  You can also arrange to see an Oliver in your area.  Mike

 

Edited by Mike and Carol
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Mike and Carol | Fair Oaks Ranch, TX | 2016 Elite II #135 | 2020 Ram Rebel 4X4 5.7L Hemi

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Posted (edited)

What are the pros/cons of Oliver vs Airstream? (I know a broad subject.)

Airstream advantages:

Size - the extra foot in width and greater choices of lengths mean that the Airstreams can offer a bit more space and floor plan options.  And there are larger Airstream models that work well for families, whereas the Olivers mainly appeal to couples or single owners.  

Finishes - I think that most Oliver owners would agree that the finishes in an Airstream are nicer and offer more choices whereas the Oliver interior is more utilitarian, though attractive. 

Prestige - Let's face it, Airstream is the classic to which all others are compared.

Oliver advantages:

Size - the narrower Olivers are easier to maneuver and can fit places an Airstream cannot - and you don't need towing mirrors with an Ollie.  

Ease of towing - I've never heard of anyone complain of sway or other instability with an Ollie, even when towing with less than ideal vehicles.

Toughness - The fiberglass shell on an Ollie is heavy and durable.  No popped rivets, no seams to seal, no fear of hail, and generally just more resilient.  Since the interiors are moulded fiberglass as well, you can bounce an Oliver down a rough gravel road without worrying that your cabinetry will fall apart.  

Easily modifiable - you'd be surprised how readily some of us will pull out a saw.

Super easy to maintain - the finishes inside can be quickly wiped down after a trip and the exterior is equally as easy to keep washed and waxed. 

Great service and an amazing family of owners - you'll see us question some Oliver decisions, designs, etc. from time to time, but one thing I think most everyone agrees on is that Oliver will stand behind their product and if things go wrong, they'll make it right.  And if you ever need help with anything, there's always another owner willing to share their experience, offer solutions or advice, and even lend a helping hand.

I was wondering about the durability of the shell and the ability to get the shell repaired?  Also Major vs minor repairs to shell?

Any marine fiberglass repair shop can repair damage to an Oliver shell, as can the factory.  The shell itself is surprisingly tough - we've seen one Oliver in a major accident where the trailer slid in the snow, hit a bridge railing, and flipped, but the shell remained in tact and was repairable.  I know of another owner who I think backed into a low tree branch and put a hole in the back corner on the curve and Oliver repaired it so that you couldn't tell it ever happened.  

Airstream has guards all around the front end to protect the alumiinim body and glass.  Any problems with the Oliver in this aspect?

Some, but there are a handful of solutions that people have come up with to deal with it.  Since there's no window in front to worry about, I think the easiest and most durable solution is to coat the lower half of the front with a clear 3M film.  That's something that can be done yourself or at most any detailing shop.  

What is the the longevity of Oliver?  (20year old Airstream is still young)

Who knows?  We plan for ours to last at least that long.  I've seen many of the earliest Olivers and they all look great.  Just thinking about "restoring" a 50 year old Oliver - no wood to rot, all the components are standard and easily replaced, rust free frame, no cabinetry to rebuild, easily accessed plumbing and electrical, etc.  

Does the shell degrade with longterm exposure to the environment, ie weather, UV,...?

Sure, if not taken care of.  Oliver has a couple of the first Ollies that they've left sitting outside without much care and they're starting to look a bit dull.  But I think a good polishing would freshen them up.  All of the older Ollies I've seen apart from those still look shiny.  Same as a fiberglass boat, I guess.  We've also had owners paint or wrap the exterior, because they wanted a different color, so that's always an option down the road even if the finish on the shell were to deteriorate to the point that it couldn't just be polished.  

Does the shell have seems that need to be sealed, if so how often?

No seams, but some penetrations like the plumbing vent and windows will need to be recaulked every three or four years.  I just did mine for the first time (they didn't really need it) and it was an easy afternoon's job.  One thing about the Ollie is that if there ever is a leak, it's easy to spot and there's very little damage that can be done.  

People put lift kits on the Airstreams because they sit soo low, Does Oliver need this or is a lift kit available?

Olivers do sit noticeably higher.  It isn't at all necessary, but of course some of us have looked into various methods to raise them even further.  The older Elite 1's, and maybe even the current ones, had the axles mounted under the springs which gave them about 4" more clearance.  I asked Oliver to do that to my E2, and it was just too high - looked silly and I was worried about stability.  But because the suspension is built on a removable subframe, you could really take it off and do whatever you want.  My own experience taking my E2 offroad is that the clearance is actually pretty good as it is.  I've yet to drag the bumper or high center the tongue.  I banged the steps on the pavement once, turning off of a paved road with a very low shoulder but the asphalt took the brunt of that encounter.  The biggest issue is that just like the Airstream there's not a lot of suspension travel, and on the Ollie, that means that the axles can bang the steel subframe.   That's never caused any damage, you can just tell looking a the subframe that it's been knocked a few times.  I've looked into installing a Lippert Centerpoint airbag kit to mine, and I think it would work - that would give a couple extra inches of clearance and a softer ride on rough roads.

The Airstream has steel frames that are prone to rust if care is not taken with them.  I Oliver use aluminum which can corrode and can be prone to repetitive stress fractures.  Are there any precautions/worries that you need to worry about with the frame of the Oliver?

I have seen one Oliver frame failure from stress cracks, which Oliver replaced for free.  That was one of the earliest E2's, which had a much lighter aluminum frame with a different design than the current one, and it also had many miles on it.  The frame was reengineered at some point early on in production and the current one is much beefier - I haven't heard of any failures or stress cracks on one of those.  

I know this is a bunch of questions. Sorry.

That what this forum is for.  Welcome - please stick around and ask many more.

Edited by Overland
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Snowball • 256 • 2018 Ford Raptor

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There are a number of Oliver owners that had airstreams. I've never owned one. My familiarity with Airstream is limited to the two owned by my brother's in-laws, and what I've seen at shows.

We've owned our Oliver Elite since February, 2008, hull #12, so I can speak to Oliver longevity.

33 minutes ago, 2008RN said:

I was wondering about the durability of the shell and the ability to get the shell repaired?  Also Major vs minor repairs to shell?

The shell is very thick, and quite durable. And pretty, with shiny marine grade gelcoat. Keep it waxed, and it stays shiny. Ours has been through a major hailstorm, (steely marble size), with no damage to the trailer nor the solar panels. An airstream would undoubtedly have been severely dimpled.

Repairs to the fiberglass hull can be done by Oliver, or, I suspect, many boatyards.  We've never needed any, other than filling a couple rock chip dings that Oliver did for us when we took the trailer in for some upgrades. We have over 100,000 miles and countless nights of travel on ours. 

39 minutes ago, 2008RN said:

Does the shell degrade with longterm exposure to the environment, ie weather, UV,...?

No. Just keep it waxed. We use a quality 3m marine wax, with uv protection. If you don't keep it waxed, it can chalk or haze, just like a fiberglass boat hull, over time. Our trailer has never been covered, or in a garage. In the sun, 24/7/365 for 12.5 years. It looks great.

40 minutes ago, 2008RN said:

Airstream has guards all around the front end to protect the alumiinim body and glass.  Any problems with the Oliver in this aspect?

No windows in the front. The bath and closet are at the front.

Some people have taken theirs to Alaska, and have used a variety of mats or foam sheets on the front to protect the hull from Alaska's gravel chips. A few have added a rock guard coating, like Vortex, as permanent protection to the front. I've seen Pete's,  and it looks great. But, we've not seen the need in the last 100,000 miles. We have mudflaps on the trailer and tow vehicle, rock tamers on the truck, and keep a reasonable distance following anyone on gravel roads for the sake of out truck windshield. 

58 minutes ago, 2008RN said:

What is the the longevity of Oliver?  (20year old Airstream is still young)

I thoroughly expect that our Oliver will be looking good, and on the road with someone else, hopefully our daughter, long after we're gone. You'll see Bolers that are single shell, thinner Glassworks, that are 50 years old at rallies. Our fiberglass sailboat is over 40 years old, and still looks great. It's a long lasting material. 

 

1 hour ago, 2008RN said:

People put lift kits on the Airstreams because they sit soo low, Does Oliver need this or is a lift kit available?

No. They sit pretty high as it is. That's why it comes with a folding double step. They didn't originally,  and we added the one Oliver builds now. 

1 hour ago, 2008RN said:

pros/cons

No rivets.

No wood in the interior (except the drawers.) So nothing to rot should moisture find its way in.

44 minutes ago, 2008RN said:

Does the shell have seems that need to be sealed, if so how often?

No. The seam of the two hulls is permanent,  and protected by the overlapping lip.

You will need to reseal/recaulk windows, vents, and other hull pebetrations from time to time, but that's true with any rv, made from any material.

1 hour ago, 2008RN said:

Are there any precautions/worries that you need to worry about with the frame of the Oliver?

Oliver uses a high grade aluminum. I don't remember the number.  We've had no issues. Of course, it's prudent to check any frame, at least annually. I'm much happier to have the beefy aluminum frame than a steel frame, living in Florida,  on the salt water.

I'm sure others will offer other ideas and opinions. If you have other questions,  fire away.  You've come to the right place.

Sherry

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Welcome to the forum, ask away! If you have not already, watch some RV factory tour videos FIRST, to get a feel for how regular "stick and staple" trailers are made. Airstream is no different in construction, other than their VERY high maintenance aluminum shell. Everything else in an AS is standard RV issue....

Google "RV Factory Tour"

Here is a good one (good in a bad way) ... 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWokMmlKmT8

AFTER having watched those, watch this factory Ollie tour.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2rnZgn7-Xg

A light bulb will illuminate inside your brain and you will understand why they are very special. That will answer a whole bunch of your questions, and you will understand why it takes literally months from the beginning of the build to the half-day delivery walk through,

John Davies

Spokane WA

Edited by John E Davies
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"Mouse":  2017 Legacy Elite II NARV (Not An RV) Two Beds, Hull Number 218, See my HOW TO threads: https://olivertraveltrailers.com/topic/john-e-davies-how-to-threads-and-tech-articles-links/

Tow Vehicle: 2013 Land Cruiser 200, 33" LT tires, airbags.

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The best indication - Airstream owners that have switched or long to do so.....

There are salient good features of both TT,  as for exterior durability - here is no comparison.  One hail storm and .... Oliver for the win

Interior layout - the AS is wider, the Ollie is a little narrower, floor plans  - 2 with Oliver, AS I'm not sure.    Push

Components and other options - Olive wins hands down.

Chassis, clearance, and towability - Oliver by a large margin

Warranty - factory support - Oliver is world class in this segment.

Cost factors, apples to apples - Oliver is the value leader.

Cool factor - depends on your values......

Oliver is a great TT.

 

 

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Cindy,  Russell and  "Harley dog" . Home is our little farm near Winchester TN

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Fiberglass is an oddity in a disposable world. A great fiberglass construction quote comes from an indie documentary called Hold Fast:

"When fiberglass boats first went into production, the naysayers went into hysterics. Traditionalists pontificated on the value of wooden construction and warned that these so called "boats" made of plastic were bound to wear out and disintegrate within five years... but this was before anyone understood just how permanent plastic is. As it turned out, the curse of fiberglass boats was not their short lifespan but their longevity - wood rots. But just as plastic bottles now pervade landscapes with the patience of eternity, fiberglass boats litter the ocean. They are everywhere and they are here to stay. Once a fiberglass boat is built, chances are that it will be here a century later and at this point they have been in continual production for 50 years."

Edited by Jairon
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Posted (edited)

I took another look at the airstream 23 twin. Beds are at the front, and cabinetry and bath block the rear view.. 

Honestly,  most great campsites are back in..  Why people think a front window is important is beyond me. My rear view window is my window on the (beautiful ) world. When we are boondocking, the rear window shade is open, and I wake up to new, amazing views. I really don't want to wake up to a view of the truck bed.

On the con side, due to the narrow width of the Oliver,  (which has allowed us into tiny, but beautiful sites, between trees), we always have a wet bath .

The airstream 23 has a dry bath. If that is important to you.

Sherry 

Edited by SeaDawg
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2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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I can’t speak to your questions with any authority as my EII is being built now. However, we have been going through the decision making process for over 12 years, anticipating 2020 as the year for us to purchase. We’ve toured multiple factories, visited at least 40 dealerships and researched specs for everything from A’s, C’s and B’s. We were constantly stopping and going back over our criteria and finally focused on 3 class C models. 

While at a dealership last fall, my wife randomly walked into an AS. Once again we shifted our thought process to add the possibility of a towable. Just before we went to the Tampa RV show in January, I convinced my wife to visit the Oliver factory (38 miles from home).  Walking in one and getting the factory tour was life changing.  When we got to Tampa, we literally walked into 4 RVs and found ourselves comparing everything to the Oliver then left and went to the beach!
 

One of the things we were most excited about with Oliver was NOT having to go through a dealer or anything like we experienced at the Tampa show.  Through the years of dealerships, test drives and being pursued by sales people, I cannot tell you the name of one sales person we worked with nor remember anyone that built trust with us to feel confident about our major purchase.

So, I recommend using the resources at Oliver to find one to tour in your area. If you can swing it, get to the factory and see the whole process. In lieu of a visit, use YouTube.  After all these years, this was a huge paradigm shift for us but, we have never looked back or had buyers remorse and are completely comfortable with our choice. 
 

 

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David and Vicky
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Thanks everyone that have replied. I have learned a lot already.   I live in Oregon, So I am a long way from the factory in TN.  I have yet to see a Oliver around Oregon, but I am sure there are some.

I am starting to think Oliver may be the way to go for my Wife and me. I am 4 years from retirement. We started with a tent trailer and then graduated to a  1978 GMC 4108 35' Greyhound bus conversion.  We loved the traveling and camping, it almost caused a divorce, I spent several years working on it and not paying attention to the family.

Both of us are looking forward to getting back out and traveling and the independance it brings.

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I am no RV expert.  My wife and I have rented two Airstreams (a late model Flying Cloud 25 Twin and a brand new Caravel 22).  My only experience with Oliver has been online research and we were shown an Elite 2 recently by local owners.  We really liked both brands.

With that caveat, we decided to place an order for an Oliver.  Here are the primary reasons:

1.  Fiberglass vs aluminum.  We typically spend at least half our summer in the CO mountains and we have been in several (if not dozens) of hail storms.  I suspect the aluminum might not last through a major hail storm.

2.  Interior construction.  We think the interior components are more sturdy in the Oliver.  Because you are driving the trailer and it is shaking, anything that is attached to the walls is apt to loosen over time.  All cabinetry, dinette frames, bathroom partitions, closets, etc. in an Airstream are riveted to the shell.  In a fiberglass Oliver, these components are a part of the mold.  To us, this made the Oliver "feel" more stable, secure and higher quality.

There were other factors that weighed significantly in the Airstream's favor:

3.  Exterior looks and "coolness" factor.  This is entirely subjective, but we really like the aluminum exterior and think the Airstreams are a "hip" or "cool" trailer.

4.  Interior designs - my wife preferred the interior decor of the Airstream. 

5.  Size and floor plan options - The Airstreams are wider.  So it gives you a roomier interior.  It also decreases visibility when towing.  Airstreams have many more floorplan options.

6.  Airstream offers ducted air conditioning.  This is quieter and more versatile than a standard RV AC (that is in the Oliver).

 

Our 2 cents.  Good luck!

 

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11 hours ago, Jairon said:

Fiberglass is an oddity in a disposable world. A great fiberglass construction quote comes from an indie documentary called Hold Fast:

"When fiberglass boats first went into production, the naysayers went into hysterics. Traditionalists pontificated on the value of wooden construction and warned that these so called "boats" made of plastic were bound to wear out and disintegrate within five years... but this was before anyone understood just how permanent plastic is. As it turned out, the curse of fiberglass boats was not their short lifespan but their longevity - wood rots. But just as plastic bottles now pervade landscapes with the patience of eternity, fiberglass boats litter the ocean. They are everywhere and they are here to stay. Once a fiberglass boat is built, chances are that it will be here a century later and at this point they have been in continual production for 50 years."

I going to have to disagree with you.  Compared to aluminum you will find far less old fiberglass boats.    Any of the composites that are exposed to UV are subject to degradation.  Sheltering from UV is the only prevention.  Aluminum can be preserved with paint.

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1 hour ago, Dean said:

I going to have to disagree with you.  Compared to aluminum you will find far less old fiberglass boats.    Any of the composites that are exposed to UV are subject to degradation.  Sheltering from UV is the only prevention.  Aluminum can be preserved with paint.

I'm not really sure that we have a different opinion on the properties of aluminum vs fiberglass. I'd love to buy an aluminum yacht! Unfortunately the only ones I can afford are fiberglass and made 50-70 years ago. There are tons of them that still sail today and the ones that are sold sell for 4-5x their original price.

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Posted (edited)

I've seen some imaginative paint jobs on Bolers and their tow vehicles in Canada. (These aren't my photos, just examples from the web.)

 

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Edited by SeaDawg
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2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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Set aside the aluminum vs fiberglass. The most destructive  source of any Rv is water. It can delaminate rot wood corrode metal and short out electrical systems.  The airstream would do all that, I know from experience. 2017  30’ airstreams serenity. I had  a leak in the bathroom which was in the walls. The plywood floors got soaked. The bat insulation in the walls were saturated with water.  Because the floors were wet it delaminated the flooring. After everything dried out, then noticed the frame starting to rust.  Should I continue?  And not to mention carrying a pop rivet gun to replace rivets popping  out. Keep comparing the apples to oranges. The Oliver wins.

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19 hours ago, 2008RN said:

Thanks everyone that have replied. I have learned a lot already.   I live in Oregon, So I am a long way from the factory in TN.  I have yet to see a Oliver around Oregon, but I am sure there are some.

I am starting to think Oliver may be the way to go for my Wife and me. I am 4 years from retirement. We started with a tent trailer and then graduated to a  1978 GMC 4108 35' Greyhound bus conversion.  We loved the traveling and camping, it almost caused a divorce, I spent several years working on it and not paying attention to the family.

Both of us are looking forward to getting back out and traveling and the independance it brings.

Where are you in Oregon?  We will be bringing our Elite II Twin home in December.  We live on the South Coast.

If you contact Oliver, they can find an owner nearby.  A friend of ours camped next to one in Gold Beach in the past couple of weeks.  They are around, but haven't hit the West Coast much yet. .  . . . . . soon, though, I expect to see more of them on the road.

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Ray and Susan Huff

Elite II Twin Hull# 699 - delivery December 7, 2020

2013 F350 3.2l diesel Super Duty 4x4 long bed crew cab

2017 Leisure Travel Van Unity Twin Bed (sold)

AZARCACOGAHIIDILKSLAMSMONENVNMOKORSCTNTX

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I’m just chiming in. You can have a look at a long term use Airstream on the Long, Long Honeymoon YouTube channel. They had extensive work done to their Airstream in California to rebuild the floor and the steel Outriggers supporting the floor. With the Oliver fiberglass monocoque construction, such repairs should never be needed. 

SeaDawg, where can I find Photos of the Vortex rock shield you referred to in your post? Thanks!

Airstreams are much easier to modify, because so much of the interior is built after the shell and screwed in place.

Edited by Popcorn-Billy

Best regards,

Bill

 

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Posted (edited)

I don't  think bugeyedriver posted any photos, but here's a link to the discussion.  I've seen his trailer. The color match was excellent,  coating looked really nice .

 

Edited by SeaDawg
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2008 Ram 1500 4 × 4

2008 Oliver Elite, Hull #12
 

 

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I was camping a few weeks ago and a Airstream owner came over to say Hi, In the conversation he said his Airstream had a bad dent in one of the panels, this quoted repair for one panel was $6000. I explained my got sideswiped on the 3rd day (yes 3 days after delivery day!!)... my repair was about $450 and MY Oliver bumper took off the cars bumper that hit us and did no damage to the Oliver's bumper (well one small cut that the factory repaired).

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Sue & Harold

 

Oliver Elite II Twin bed,  Hull #508, Ram 2500

               States Visited Map                    

 

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On 8/24/2020 at 2:12 AM, 2008RN said:

Thanks everyone that have replied. I have learned a lot already.   I live in Oregon, So I am a long way from the factory in TN.  I have yet to see a Oliver around Oregon, but I am sure there are some.

I am starting to think Oliver may be the way to go for my Wife and me. I am 4 years from retirement. We started with a tent trailer and then graduated to a  1978 GMC 4108 35' Greyhound bus conversion.  We loved the traveling and camping, it almost caused a divorce, I spent several years working on it and not paying attention to the family.

Both of us are looking forward to getting back out and traveling and the independance it brings.

We're in Southern Oregon.  When we were interested in seeing a trailer Oliver set us up with some folks who are 4 hours from us.  We met with them and they spent several hours with us, enough time that we knew we'd be placing a order shortly thereafter.   No need to travel to the factory.  Instead, take the tour when you pick up your trailer.  We scheduled our pickup for the day before the annual rally in Alabama.  Worked out great!

 

Steph and Steve from Jacksonville OREGON


Oliver Elite II, Pickup May 2019


Ram 1500 4x4 

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53 minutes ago, sakthorp said:

We're in Southern Oregon.  When we were interested in seeing a trailer Oliver set us up with some folks who are 4 hours from us.  We met with them and they spent several hours with us, enough time that we knew we'd be placing a order shortly thereafter.   No need to travel to the factory.  Instead, take the tour when you pick up your trailer.  We scheduled our pickup for the day before the annual rally in Alabama.  Worked out great!

 

What route did you take to Tennessee?  I-40?  Our delivery is December 7.  We are hoping to go through Reno, via Hwy 395 from Redding, then hit I-40 south of Las Vegas.  We'll be driving our tow vehicle - an F-350 4wd crew cab, so the trip out should be fine.  We'd like to come home the same route, knowing if we encounter bad weather, we can just wait it out. Wintery weather that time of year shouldn't last too long and we have all the time we want coming home.

Selling our motor home Monday, so we'll be RV "homeless" for 3 months ☹️ an during some of the best camping weather in the PNW.  Getting excited to pickup our Oliver!!!!

Ray and Susan Huff

Elite II Twin Hull# 699 - delivery December 7, 2020

2013 F350 3.2l diesel Super Duty 4x4 long bed crew cab

2017 Leisure Travel Van Unity Twin Bed (sold)

AZARCACOGAHIIDILKSLAMSMONENVNMOKORSCTNTX

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We drove there via the northern route and returned via the southern route.  May weather.  Watch for snow in either route in December?

Screen Shot 2020-08-29 at 9.31.25 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-08-29 at 9.31.14 PM.png

Steph and Steve from Jacksonville OREGON


Oliver Elite II, Pickup May 2019


Ram 1500 4x4 

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